Progress in
Partnership

The Regional Transport
Plan for South West Wales

2010 – 2015

Acknowledgements

This Regional Transport Plan could not have been prepared without the help and support of many people within and beyond the South West Wales region. Our thanks extend to everyone who has played their part in developing the Plan and particularly to the following:

The elected Members, especially SWWITCH Joint Committee Members, who have supported the Plan through its development.

The Chief Officers and Officers of each constituent Local Authority for their contributions, detailed and accurate knowledge and continuing enthusiasm to get things right.

Our Key Stakeholders who have given freely of their time to engage in the Plan development process.

All other Consultees who have taken time to give constructive criticism and thus ensure the Plan reflects true needs and effective and viable solutions for the future.

Jason Thomas, Welsh Assembly Government Regional Transport Planner, whose support and input has proved invaluable.

David Sandy and David Whitehead, both formerly of the Officer Working Group, who have made significant contributions to the development of the Plan, and who have both retired in the last year.

CONTENTS

Chapter Page

Executive Summary vi

One Introduction, Vision And Objectives 1

Two Options and Long Term Strategy 32

Three Regional Transport Plan Policies and Component Strategies 45

Four Regional Transport Plan Programme 66

Five Delivery and Monitoring 83

Six WelTAG 89

Seven Strategic Environmental Assessment 96

Figures

ES 1
RTP Stages and Engagement vii xv

ES2
Filtering Stakeholder project ideas

1.1
South West Wales Region 2

1.2
Wales Spatial Plan: Swansea Bay and Western valleys Area Strategy 4

1.3
Wales Spatial Plan: Pembrokeshire – Haven Area Strategy 5

1.4
Trans European Network 7

1.5
Indices of Multiple Deprivation 9

1.6
RTP Stages and Engagement 11

1.7
Strategic Road Network 13

1.8
Rail Network 14

1.9
Strategic Bus Network 15

1.10
Key Transport Interchanges 16

1.11
Accessibility to all hospitals by public transport 18

1.12
Accessibility to all hospitals by car 18

1.13
Swansea: Frequency of public transport to all other key settlements 19

1.14
Engagement Sources and Key Issues Emerging 23

2.1
Prioritisation Results for Long Term Strategy Elements 35

2.2
Long Term Strategy Areas of Influence 40

4.1
Filtering Stakeholder project ideas 67

4.2
RTP Programme development summary 69

ES1 Projects which met the appraisal threshold xvi

ES2 Summary of 3 programme options xvii

ES3 SWWITCH Monitoring Proposals xx

1.1 Key results of the Strategic Level Assessment 21

1.2 Prioritising Accessibility Issues 22

1.3 RTP objectives matched against WTS outcomes 29

1.4 RTP Objectives matched against WTS Strategic Priorities 30

1.5 Wales Transport Strategy Outcomes and Strategic Priorities 31

2.1 RTP long term strategy appraisal with the WTS outcomes 41

2.2 RTP long term strategic appraisal match with the WTS Strategic 42

priorities

2.3 RTP long term strategy appraisal match with the Strategic 43

Environment Assessment Objectives

3.1 RTP Policies appraised against Objectives 48

4.1 RTP projects which have passed the Prioritisation screening process 70

4.2 RTP Programme appraised against WTS Strategic Priorities 72

4.3 Outline RTP Programme 74

4.4 RTP 2 and 3 Outline Programmes 81

5.1 Core Regional Indicators 87

6.1 Appraisal of RTP objectives against the problems identified by 93

stakeholders

6.2 RTP Long Term Strategy appraisal match with RTP Objectives 94

6.3 Appraisal Proformas 95

7.1 Stages of the SEA 96

7.2 Stages of Appropriate Assessment process 97

7.3 Tabulation of scoping responses 98

7.4 Appropriate Assessment Screening Methodology for SW Wales RTP 100

Tables Photographs

Foreword

Good access is critical to our quality of life in South West Wales. Improving access and transport links and services can help to increase opportunities for work, training and leisure/social activities as well as improve the viability and sustainability of businesses.

We are pleased to have collaborated on the development of a Regional Transport Plan for the region and we will continue and develop that partnership approach to deliver the outcomes of the plan. The Plan is intended to provide a long term strategy for the period up to 2025 and also a five year programme of projects which will help us to achieve that strategy. The Plan cannot be delivered by SWWITCH alone, it will require good partnership working between a range of public and private sector agencies who influence the demand for transport, or who help to meet that demand.

The Regional Transport Plan is not intended to be cast in tablets of stone. Whilst the objectives and broad strategy will remain the same, inevitably there will changes in priorities over the years as SWWITCH seeks to deliver new access needs or take advantage of opportunities that may occur over time. Annual progress reports will be published which explain changes and our stakeholders will be involved and informed in that process.

We have been helped along the way by many stakeholders who have had input at each stage of developing the draft plan and we want to express out thanks for their time, effort and commitment. We look forward to continuing to work with you on the delivery of Regional Transport Plan policies and projects.

Councillor W Hayden Jones Councillor John Hague Carmarthenshire County Council City & County of Swansea SWWITCH Chair 2009/10

Councillor Arwyn Woolcock Councillor Jamie Adams Neath Port Talbot County Borough Pembrokeshire County Council Council

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

. • Improving economic activity

. • Raising skill levels

. • Healthier and more active individuals and communities

. • Increasing social inclusion

Consultation

. • Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment – using the computer based mapping system Accession

. • Travel Pattern Research – involving 7 day travel diaries completed by more than 2000 residents in the region

. • Public Transport Passenger Satisfaction surveys – involving users and non users of public transport

. • Local Authority “Citizens’ Panels” – with demographically representative samples responding to specific questions on transport

E1.6 The RTP Strategy and Policies cover all aspects of access and transport and will provide a framework for the transport activities of public, private and voluntary sector organisations in South West Wales. The RTP is also a bidding document for a programme of capital transport expenditure to help deliver improved access. However the programme does not include transport responsibilities of WAG (although SWWITCH does make recommendations about WAG priorities) or commercial organisations which SWWITCH cannot directly influence. In addition, the Programme does not include revenue projects, which are an essential part of providing good access in the region.

Key transport issues in the region

E1.7 The South West Wales region is diverse geographically, demographically and economically, and includes congested urban areas, isolated rural communities and a wide variation in between. It also includes National Park areas and the Gower Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

E1.8 Despite the diversity, many similar access problems exist and these have been highlighted during regional consultation on the Wales Spatial Plan (WSP) and the RTP.

E1.9 The following key transport issues, which have arisen repeatedly during consultation, have formed the basis for the development of the RTP.

. • Road traffic volumes in the region have grown considerably during the last decade resulting in pressures in terms of unreliable journey times, increased congestion, reduced air quality, increased noise, vibration and carbon emissions.

. • Road safety issues raise public concerns and whilst there has been a general reduction in serious injuries and deaths from road traffic collisions, there are wide variations across the region and for particular road users categories

. • Car Ownership and use has increased rapidly although there are disparities across the region. Those with cars are able to participate in a far wider range of opportunities than those reliant on public transport, walking or cycling

. • Public Transport provision broadly matches population distribution with higher frequency services and better coverage to the south and east of the region where the majority of the population lives, and less extensive provision in the more sparsely populated rural areas. Rail, bus and coach services are provided by private sector companies through a mixture of commercial operation and subsidised services. Physical access to bus and rail services and rolling stock remains a barrier to mobility impaired in some locations

E1.10 Other key transport facilities and services which have influenced the RTP development include:

. • Freight operation is an essential contributor to the economy but is planned and delivered by the private sector within European and UK legislative processes

. • Ports and Shipping facilitate the movement of passengers and freight to and from the region and are a critical link in the national supply chain network

. • There are three small Airports in the region: Swansea, Pembrey and Withybush. They do not currently play a strategic role or provide scheduled services, but they all have the potential to be developed to serve small niche markets for business and leisure travel.

E1.11 Taking into consideration all of the problems and concerns highlighted by formal research or the input of stakeholders during consultation, SWWITCH developed and adopted a vision for improved access and transport in the region.

RTP Vision

E1.12 The vision was developed into specific objectives for the region. There were originally nine objectives, but these were amended as a direct result of stakeholder feedback and the seven RTP objectives shown below encapsulate what SWWITCH wants the RTP strategy, policies and programme to deliver.

E1.13 The objectives are critical as they formed the starting point for all further stakeholder appraisal and decision making. The consultation on strategic options, on developing and appraising a long term strategy and on the priorities for the RTP programme, all focused on what would provide best fit with the RTP objectives. Similarly outline monitoring proposals and the future development of indicators and targets will focus on how well the RTP objectives are being met. This objective led approach is an essential element of the WelTAG process that SWWITCH has embedded throughout the RTP development.

      E1.14 The extensive work with stakeholders also highlighted key opportunities and challenges for the future, including: Opportunities

. • Further development on improving the range of alternative (to the private car) transport options

. • Increasing emphasis on raising awareness and marketing sustainable transport and multi modal ticketing

0• New technology facilitating reduced demands for travel and cleaner vehicles and fuels

1Challenges

. • Climate change and reducing carbon emissions

. • Reliance on fossil fuels with finite supplies and market uncertainties

. • Capital and Revenue funding for essential transport projects and

E2.0 Options and Long Term Strategy

E2.1 Following adoption of the RTP vision and objectives the next stage of the RTP was to examine high level options for achieving the objectives and the development and appraisal of a long term strategy to provide a framework for policies and practical actions to improve access and transport.

Option generation and appraisal

E2.2 A number of different planning scenarios were tested through stakeholder workshops to stimulate debate and determine which would result in most progress towards the RTP objectives.

E2.3 The scenarios/options used were as follows:

. • Car is King – This scenario involves developing a strategy and programme to support car use.

. • Hearts & Minds – This scenario focuses on encouraging more use of sustainable travel and the reduction of non-essential travel.

. • Demand Restraint – This scenario involves actions to restrict private car use.

. • Planning the Future – This scenario involves land-use planning being integrated with other policies to reduce the need for the private car and to provide for more sustainable transport.

. • Public Transport Rules – This scenario supports the growth, development and use of public transport.

. • Mix & Match – This scenario involves a combination of the above.

E2.4 The outcome of the consultation on option generation was that for the region as a whole the “Mix and Match” option, involving a range of measures, was considered the only realistic approach.

Long Term Strategy

E2.5 The development and appraisal of a long term strategy to achieve RTP objectives was again an interactive process with sustained stakeholder engagement. Stakeholders were asked to consider a range of potential strategy elements and to add extra ones if they felt some had been missed. They were then asked to rank the elements in order of priority with the highest ranking being the elements most likely to achieve the objectives.

E2.6 The results from all the stakeholder sessions were amalgamated and priorities were examined in detail by SWWITCH. Some of the prioritised long term strategy elements were directly related to issues which SWWITCH cannot directly influence. This could be because they are in the commercial domain (for example sustainable freight and fuels) or they are directly controlled by WAG (the Rail network and services and Strategic East/West road links). Additionally some of the prioritised elements directly related to revenue expenditure. Whilst revenue funding is critical to delivering improved access and transport and this is highlighted throughout the RTP, the main focus of the RTP is securing capital investment on transport infrastructure and services.

E2.7 Taking the issues in E2.6 into account, the results of the Long Term Strategy consultation were appraised in the context of the high level aspirations set out in One Wales and the Wales Spatial Plan and the strategic priorities of the Wales Transport Strategy. This resulted in the adoption by SWWITCH of the following long term strategy priorities:

E2.8 SWWITCH has developed more specific strategy proposals for four types of areas within the region. These areas are not specifically defined and are intended to reflect the different strategic priorities that will be needed across such a diverse region. The areas are:

. • Swansea Urban Area

. • Strategic Corridors

. • Key Settlements and their hinterlands

. • Rural areas

E3.0 RTP Policies and Component Strategies

E3.1 The improvements that the RTP seeks to make to access and transport are not simply about specific projects or service improvements. It is also about:

. • the way in which services are planned

. • the partnership approach to development and delivery

. • the integration between strategies, policies and actions

E3.2 The overarching policy of the RTP is to improve access to facilitate a good quality of life and a viable and thriving regional economy. This will be achieved through a range of physical, policy and revenue based measures. However, more detailed specific policies have been developed and set out according to the Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities. These are shown below:

E3.3 WAG has asked consortia to identify priorities for those transport areas which will be delivered by the National Transport Plan, namely Trunk Road, Rail and Revenue priorities. SWWITCH recognises the importance of investment in these areas to the success of the RTP and has adopted the following priorities.

Rail Priorities

Description

Detail

Priority

Improvements to Rail Services West of Swansea

• Redoubling the line west of Swansea to secure improved services to West Wales including • 3 trains per hour between Swansea, Gowerton, Llanelli and

1

 

Carmarthen

 
 

• Hourly services from Carmarthen to Milford Haven

 
 

• 5 trains per day to Fishguard Harbour

 

Improving Rail Services to Cardiff, Bristol and London

• Reducing the journey times to Cardiff, London and beyond • Improving access to and facilities at mainline stations drawing on all sources including National Station Improvement Programme funds and EU Convergence funding

2

Improving the access to and use of rail services

• Five trains per day on the Heart Of Wales Line (HOWL) • Improving the Swanline service • Developing new stations where justified and reviewing the long term role of smaller stations

3

 

• Maintenance and development of the South West Wales Community

 
 

Rail Partnership

 

Trunk Road Priorities Revenue Priorities

Description

Detail

 

Priority

Trunk Road

• A40 Penblewin to Slebech

 

1

Commitments

• A40 The Kell

   
 

• A477 St Clears to Red Roses

   
 

• A 40 Llandewi Velfrey to Penblewin

   
 

• A483 Llandeilo bypass

   

M4 and Trunk Road priority

• M4 junction improvements to reduce congestion and connectivity

improve

2

measures

• Consideration of Park and Share sites near to M4 junctions

   
 

• Signalisation of Pensarn roundabout in Carmarthen

   
 

• A48 at Cross Hands improvements

   

 

• Trunking of:

 
 

• A4138 - between M4 and Llanelli

 
 

• A483 - Fabian Way corridor

 

A 40 improvements

• Improvements to the A40 west of St Clears including dualling if the business case is proven • Access from the A40 to the proposed Carmarthen west link road

3

Trunking and De- Trunking

• Trunking of: • A485/6 - Carmarthen to Synod Inn

4

 

• A476 between Cross Hands and Ffairfach accompanied by a subsequent de-trunking of the A483 from Pont Abraham through Ammanford to Ffairfach/Llandeilo

 
 

• De-Trunking of:

 
 

• A40 Salutation Square to Withybush Roundabout

 

Description

Detail

Priority

Support for existing levels of

• Maintenance funding to ensure that existing facilities are retained in first class condition

1

service

• Maintain current levels of support for existing rail services, bus

 
 

services and community transport schemes in the region

 

Support for improved services

• Increased maintenance funding to include new infrastructure • Improved and additional bus services focusing on delivering the WSP access aspirations and the Accessibility Strategy

2

 

• Rail services – improvements to services in terms of new rolling stock or extra services will require additional WAG revenue funding through the Wales Rail Franchise

 
 

• Development of new unconventional public transport services including community transport schemes and pump priming social enterprise schemes

 

Supporting Behavioural change

• Sustainable Towns scheme development including awareness raising, campaigns and information, Personalised Travel Planning projects • Ticketing initiatives

3

 

• Better targeting of the Concessionary fares scheme to meet the needs of young people, job seekers, elderly and disabled people who do not benefit from the current concessionary scheme.

 

Support for pump priming and sustaining capital

• Revenue implications of capital projects like Park and Ride • Revenue impacts of improved parking enforcement

4

projects

   

E3.4 SWWITCH has also developed a series of component strategies providing a more comprehensive framework for the development and delivery of transport and access in the future. The component strategies relate to:

. • Freight

. • Public Transport

. • Land Use Planning

. • Traffic Management

. • Smarter Choices

. • Parking

. • Road Safety

. • Maintenance

. • Accessibility

. • Walking and Cycling

E4.0 RTP Programme

E4.1 Once SWWITCH adopted objectives and a long term strategy, there was further detailed consultation and appraisal of a programme of projects to help deliver them. Stakeholders were encouraged to put forward any projects which they considered would help achieve the overarching objectives and more than 300 project ideas were put forward. These were assessed or “filtered” as shown in Figure ES2 below.

E4.2 This process resulted in a pool of 120 projects which were published for formal consultation in the Draft RTP in July 2008. Responses to the consultation highlighted some additional projects and there was some consolidation of others so that the number of projects remained at 120.

E4.3 SWWITCH used a prioritisation process, which was in line with WelTAG appraisal and which assessed all projects against the following criteria:

. • Policy fit – RTP objectives and strategy

. • Value for Money – broad brush assessment of cost vs benefits

. • Deliverability – technical, economic, political

. • Regional Impact – did the project have strategic or very localised impacts

E4.4 All 120 projects in the programme pool were appraised against these criteria and 75 projects met the threshold and now form the RTP programme. These projects are shown on the table ES 1 below.

E4.5 To construct a meaningful 5 year programme from the 75 projects SWWITCH has assessed which are most likely to be capable of delivery within 5 years and grouped similar projects together. This is important to ensure that benefits are achieved across the whole region and that there is flexibility within the programme. This means that delays in one project will not jeopardise the delivery of the whole programme as funding can be switched to another project within the same group or tranche of projects.

Table ES 1 – Projects which met the appraisal threshold

Project

Project

Quadrant Bus Station Interchange

Metro

Outstanding commitments on Carms TG schemes

Port Talbot PDR completion of 1A & B

Port Talbot PDR Stage 2

Swansea High Street station Improvements

Carmarthen Railway Station Improvements

Landore Park and Ride extension

Road Safety package

Carmarthen Road bus priority measures

Carmarthen to Swansea Bus Corridor Package

Pembroke to Milford Haven Bus Corridor

Haverfordwest to Milford Haven Bus Corridor

Swansea west Park and Ride Site

Port Talbot to Swansea Bus Corridor

Swansea Valley to City Centre Bus Corridor

Neath (Llandarcy) to Swansea Bus Corridor

Port Talbot to Neath Bus Corridor

Cross Hands Economic Link Road

Bridge improvements package on A4382 Llanwrda, Lampeter

Develop Valleys Cycle Network and Connect 2 routes

Haverfordwest to Tenby via Pembroke Bus Corridor

Llanelli Bus Station Improvements / Interchange

Milford Haven Railway Station Integrated Transport Interchange

Fishguard Bus Focal Point

Carmarthen Park & Ride

Pembroke Dock Bus/Rail Interchange

New Road Access to Morriston Hospital

Haverfordwest to Tenby via Narberth Bus corridor

Introduce sustainable towns concept

Lifestyle Changes Walking and Cycling

Re-open Goodwick station as a Bus/Rail interchange

More variable message signing

Southern Strategic Route - A477 jct to Energy Site Corridor

Port Talbot Parkway

City Centre urban cycle network

Improve Oystermouth Road corridor (European Boulevard)

Haverfordwest to Fishguard via St David’s Bus Corridor

Haverfordwest to Fishguard via Letterston Bus Corridor

Fishguard to Cardigan Bus Corridor

Ammanford to Cross Hands Bus Corridor

Tenby Bus Focal Point

Llanelli Railway Station Improvements

Clynderwen Railway Station Improvements

Newcastle Emlyn Bus Focal Point

Sw’sea Air Quality Package including Hafod Transport Scheme

Park and Share sites close to M4 junctions

N/S NCN route in Pembrokeshire

North Carms - Ceredigion Link Road

Pencader Bus Focal Point

Llandeilo Bus Focal Point

Drefach Bus Focal Point

Carmarthen West Link

Carmarthen East Link

Northern Distributor Network - Bulford Road Link

Baglan Energy Park Link Bridge

Neath Railway Station Improvements

Capital Enhancement schemes for community transport

Llanelli Park and Ride

Blackbridge Access Improvement

Multi Modal Freight Facility - Margam Wharf

Pontardawe Cross Valley Link Bridge

Gowerton Station

St. David’s Pedestrian links

Pembroke Community Regeneration Scheme Phases 1 &2

Carmarthen Bus Station

Waterston Bypass

Access to Kenfig Industrial Estate

Ammanford Distributor Road

Swansea west Access Road

Strategic Bus Corridors around Swansea

Tenby Park and Ride

Investigate light rail schemes

Morfa Distributor Road

Coed Darcy southern link

 

Please note these projects are not arranged in order of priority

E4.6 The RTP guidance requires consortia to specify three separate RTP programmes depending upon the level of funding which is made available to each consortium over the 5 year period. Legacy schemes are included in the programme but not in the total programme costs on the assumption that they will be top sliced at a national level. The three separate programmes are:

. • A do minimum level programme (based on current levels of investment) and for the RTP this would be 109m.

. • A second best level and this would total 151m

. • A preferred level totalling 191m

Table ES2 - Summary of 3 programme options Option One - Do Minimum option - 109 million

Project/scheme

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (23%)

3,000

5,000

5,000

6,000

6,000

25,000

Park and Ride development (12%)

2,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

3,000

13,000

Transport Interchanges (18%)

2,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

20,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (7%)

1,000

1,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

8,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (39%)

3,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

43,000

Totals

11,000

22,000

24,000

26,000

26,000

109,000

Option Two – Second best option - 151 million

Project/scheme

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (19%)

3,000

6,000

6,000

7,000

7,000

29,000

Park and Ride development (11%)

2,000

3,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

17,000

Transport Interchanges (15%)

2,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

22,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (7%)

1,000

1,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

10,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (48%)

3,000

15,000

20,000

20,000

15,000

73,000

Totals

11,000

30,000

37,000

39,000

34,000

151,000

Option Three – Preferred option - 191 million

Project/scheme

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (17%)

3,000

6,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

33,000

Park and Ride development (10%)

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

19,000

Transport Interchanges (14%)

2,000

5,000

5,000

7,000

7,000

26,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (5%)

1,000

1,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

10,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (54%)

3,000

20,000

30,000

30,000

20,000

103,000

Totals

11,000

35,000

49,000

53,000

43,000

191,000

xvii

E4.7 Whatever level of funding is available during the first 5 year programme, there will be a need for flexibility to react to outside developments and priorities in the region.

E5.0 Delivery and Monitoring

Delivery

E5.1 If appropriate mechanisms are not in place to ensure that forthcoming funding results in efficient and successful delivery, the stakeholder participation, the background research and the work that has been involved in developing the RTP will have been to no avail. In addition achieving the RTP objectives is much more than capital projects alone and many of the stakeholders who helped develop the RTP will be key partners in delivering the integrated and high quality access that is needed in the region, in particular:

. • Internal Local Authority colleagues from Environment, Planning, Economic Development, Housing, Education, Leisure Departments etc

. • National Park Authorities

. • Health Care planners and providers

. • Transport Operators, commercial and voluntary

. • Large Employers

. • Transport User organisations

. • Various Fora with wide ranging audiences

E5.2 The four SWWITCH Authorities have a good track record in delivering a wide range of schemes and SWWITCH intends to build on existing project management and delivery processes. This is seen as more efficient and effective than the creation of a new, separate project management/delivery structure. SWWITCH proposes a Programme Management Board comprising the project managers from each Local Authority along with the SWWITCH Coordinator and chaired by a Director or Head Of Service. This board would be responsible for ensuring progress of the programme and agreeing any shift of funding across the programme that may arise due to potential delays to specific projects. The board will report through the SWWITCH structure as shown.

Monitoring

E5.3 It is critical that SWWITCH monitors the progress of the RTP, both in terms of outputs (for example how many bus stations were improved, how many kms of cycleway were built) and in terms of outcomes (for example is there an increase in bus service patronage or improvements to the reliability of journey times).

E5.4 SWWITCH commissioned a Monitoring Action Plan in 2003 which proposed a series of Key Performance Indictors including:

. • Public transport accessibility

. • Bus and traffic journey times

. • Bus and traffic journey time reliability

. • Bus and rail passenger satisfaction

. • Environmental impacts

. • Road Safety

E5.5 Road Safety statistics are collected by all local authorities and there is good historical information to allow trends to be analysed. SWWITCH carried out bus and rail user satisfaction surveys in 2005 and in 2006/7 Travel Pattern Research and Congestion Mapping studies were completed as part of the RTP development.

E5.6 However, limited progress overall has been made in establishing baseline information, largely due to the costs associated with data collection and analysis and monitoring. The RTP will require a more holistic and sustained approach.

E5.7 The Wales Transport Strategy sets out a number of indicators which WAG will use to measure progress towards outcomes. WAG is also developing a Wales Transport Monitoring Strategy which will provide a framework for consistent monitoring across Wales, whether it is carried out at Consortia, WAG or Local Authority level.

E5.8 The Table ES3 on page xx sets out SWWITCH monitoring proposals. It can be seen that much more work is needed to assess baselines and establish trends. SWWITCH does have serious concerns about the availability of data, the costs of collection and the capacity for ongoing analysis.

E5.9 Targets have not been identified at this stage, as it is not appropriate without establishing a baseline and trends.

E6.0 WelTAG

E6.1 SWWITCH has applied the principles of the Welsh Transport Planning and Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG) throughout the development of RTP. Each stage has been subject to stakeholder engagement and scrutiny and the RTP objectives have formed the backbone of the appraisal process to ensure that the strategy, policies and projects which make up the RTP will help to deliver the objectives and vision for South West Wales.

E6.2 Stage 1 strategy appraisal was completed prior to the publication of the draft RTP in summer 2008. Stage 1 project appraisal was carried out after the public consultation once a programme pool of 120 projects was confirmed.

Table ES 3 – SWWITCH Monitoring Proposals

RTP Objective

Indicator

Data Source

Baseline

       

1

• Accessibility: maps/stats

• Accessibility planning

• RTP appendix J and K

 

• Car access

software (Accession),

 
 

• public transport access

Traveline database

 
 

• Key Connectivity analysis

   

2

• Public awareness of transport options • Public perception of quality of transport options

• Surveys • Surveys

• Some baseline survey data (2005)

 

• Patronage of bus & train services

• Operators

 
 

• Public satisfaction with bus and rail services

• Surveys, operator market research data

 
 

• Cycle usage

• Cycle counters

 

3

• Journey time reliability • buses

• ITIS data

• To be established

 

• cars

   
 

• HGVs

   

4

• Passenger satisfaction about bus rail integration

• surveys

• To be established

5

• Number of AQMAs • Air pollution index

• Local authority air quality monitoring

• Established LA monitoring

6

• Proportion of transport

• Environmental Impact

• To be established

 

schemes having an adverse impact on national and built

Assessments

 
 

environment

   

7

• Road casualty stats • KSIs

• Local authority data

• Established LA monitoring

 

• Child KSIs

   
 

• Slight injuries per 100m vehicle kms

   
 

• Public perception of personal safety related to transport

   
 

use

   

. • The time taken to appraise fully RTP projects at Stage 2 level

. • Securing agreement on what level of appraisal each project or package of projects should be subject to

. • The costs of detailed investigations for projects or packages

E6.4 The stage 2 appraisals will be completed during the next 6 to 9 months and this will

1.0 CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION, VISION AND OBJECTIVES

Introduction

. • Carmarthenshire County Council

. • Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council

. • Pembrokeshire County Council

. • City and County of Swansea.

1. 1.2 Transport Strategy for Wales - The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) published One Wales – Connecting the Nation, The Wales Transport Strategy (WTS)1 in May 2008. This sets out strategic priorities for improved transport and required outcomes across Wales. These are shown in Appendix B.

1.1.3 WAG is also in the process of preparing a National Transport Plan (NTP)2. This document follows on from the WTS and will set out what actions WAG intends to take to deliver the WTS outcomes through those elements of transport and access over which it has powers and responsibilities, including:

. • Rail services

. • Long distance bus and coach network

. • Motorway and trunk road forward programme

. • Sustainable Freight facilitation

Figure 1.1

South West Wales
Region

. • Air and shipping

. • Planning Policy Wales

1. 1.4 The draft NTP is expected to be published for consultation in Summer 2009 with a final plan adopted by the end of 2009. SWWITCH has consistency urged a strong framework for engagement between WAG and regional transport consortia on the evolving NTP. This will ensure that priorities at national and regional levels can be developed interactively and a clear and consistent way forward to facilitate One Wales can be agreed.

2. 1.5 Regional Transport Plans - WAG requires the four transport consortia in Wales to prepare Regional Transport Plans (RTP) for the period 2010 – 2015. Each RTP must help to deliver the outcomes and strategic priorities of the WTS in its region taking into account local and regional needs.

3. 1.6 The RTP is intended to set out long term aims for improved access and transport through clear policies and strategies. It will also be a bidding document for a five year programme of capital transport projects and will replace the annual transport grant bids which have previously been submitted by the individual local authorities.

4. 1.7 WAG issued guidance on developing RTPs in 20074. Since that time, the timescale for the submission of the RTP has been extended, due to delays in completing the Wales Transport Strategy and in preparing the National Transport Plan. Final RTPs are now due for submission by 30th September 2009.

5. 1.8 A formal draft RTP was published in July 2008 and consultation closed at the end of September 2008. There were 75 responses received to the draft RTP and the details of the formal consultation process are set out in Appendix E.

6. 1.9 Following the submission of the Provisional RTP in December 2008, SWWITCH has received feedback from WAG. This Final RTP updates and strengthens the December 2008 draft and also incorporates changes to address comments made by WAG. It also takes account of progress in developing the National Transport Plan.

1.10 Overarching Policy Context for the RTP - Residents, businesses and visitors to South West Wales need good access to enable them to use services/facilities, to reach markets/customers or attractions/destinations. Transport is one way of providing access to all types of activities. The RTPs and the WTS are intended to help achieve other higher level aspirations in Wales, as set out in documents such as:

. • One Wales - a Progressive Agenda for Wales

. • Wales Spatial Plan

1. 1.11 The most important link for the RTP is with the Wales Spatial Plan, which sets out the future strategic planning framework for Wales and defines the future vision and long term strategy for each area. The role of the RTP is to facilitate improved access and transport to help deliver that strategy.

1.1.12 In South West Wales, the Spatial Plan regional group boundaries are not consistent with the transport consortia boundaries. The SWWITCH region is made up of three Wales Spatial Plan (WSP) areas:

. • Swansea Bay: The Waterfront and Western Valleys

. • Pembrokeshire Haven

. • Central Wales (part)

Figure 1.2 - Wales Spatial Plan: Swansea Bay and Western Valleys Area Strategy

Reference: Wales Spatial Plan

Figure 1.3 - Wales Spatial Plan: Pembrokeshire Haven Area Strategy

Reference: Wales Spatial Plan

1. 1.14 Whilst there are some differences in emphasis between the access and transport issues between each WSP area regional strategy, the common aspiration for each area is to achieve sustainable accessibility, both internally and externally. The WSP access priorities are set out in Appendix C. Many of the WSP access aspirations depend upon a substantial increase in revenue funding, for example to improve public transport access between key settlements and to and from Strategic employment sites.

2. 1.15 The WSP was subject to extensive consultation from January to April 2008 and a Wales Spatial Plan Update5 was published in June 2008. This RTP is based on the updated WSP aspirations and SWWITCH is continuing to work with the WSP groups and private and third sector parties to develop and deliver actions plans and monitor progress.

3. 1.16 WAG recently consulted on One Wales – One Planet 6 which sets out the long term commitment and delivery mechanisms for a sustainable and thriving Wales. The proposals are intended to build on the current statutory sustainable development commitments of WAG (as set out in the Government of Wales Act 2006) and to confirm the central role of sustainability in all the activities of the Assembly.

4. 1.17 WAG is developing targets for reducing carbon emissions and these are expected to

1. 1.18 It is clear that technology (in the form of more efficient engines and cleaner fuels) and eco-driving can deliver reduced CO2 emissions over time. But these will probably not be sufficient, by themselves, to meet future targets for transport. Significant changes in travel behaviour (such as shifting from single car occupancy to car sharing, public transport, cycle and walking) will be necessary to meet such targets. SWWITCH will take appropriate steps to implement these carbon reduction targets when they are announced

1.1.19 There are a number of other relevant policy/strategy documents which the RTP must take into account and contribute to, including:

. • Unitary Development Plans (UDPs)– These are the adopted development plans for each Authority (and National Park Planning authorities where Joint Plans are not adopted) which determine where and what type of development will be permitted in specific areas. These are being replaced by:

. • Local Development Plans (LDPs)– each of which must be consistent with the WSP and also support local development aspirations and community needs. As for UDPs above, National Park Authorities are also responsible for the development of an LDP

. • Community Plans – each of which has been developed through local engagement and represents grass roots involvement in policy prioritisation and service delivery

. • Health and Well Being Strategies – these are cross service sector plans intended to deal with promoting good health as well as dealing with the impacts of ill health. Good links to health care facilities as well as sustainable transport options for promoting active lifestyles are an aspiration of each local strategy and these have fed into the RTP consultation process

. • Community Safety Strategies – these are cross sector plans developed to improve safety, personal security and, importantly, the perception of safety. These have clear links with all modes of public and private transport

1.20 Geography and Population - The South West Wales region is diverse in terms of geography, population and economy. It includes strategic road and rail links which are part of Trans European Networks (TENS) linking Ireland, the United Kingdom and mainland Europe (Figure 1.4 – page 7). It also has one Trust Port, a number of commercially operated (passenger and freight) ports and three small airports. The sea ports in particular play a significant role in supporting the national and regional economies (for example the energy and steel industries) and in enhancing international connectivity.

FIGURE 1.4

TENS
NETWORK

1. 1.21 South West Wales includes the City of Swansea, other key urban centres at Neath, Port Talbot, Llanelli, Carmarthen and Haverfordwest, significant district centres, industrial areas, valley communities, a large rural hinterland and a lengthy and beautiful coastline. The area incorporates Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, part of the Brecon Beacons National Park and the Gower Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

2. 1.22 The total population of the region is approximately 659,5007, just under a quarter of the overall population of Wales. The population is spread unevenly with relatively high population densities in the urban and more eastern part of the region and sparsely populated areas to the west and north of the region. However, there are also pockets of high population density in Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire and similarly, very low densities in parts of Neath Port Talbot and Swansea.

3. 1.23 Economy and Deprivation - Historically, the economy of the area was based on the traditional industries of coal and steel production, large-scale manufacturing, agriculture and fishing and in the west a number of Ministry of Defence establishments. However, over the last 30 years service sector employment, retail, tourism and smaller scale manufacturing have come to make up the majority of employment.

4. 1.24 There has been recent development in more specialised areas such as the energy sector in the Milford Haven waterway. This area has seen the construction of LNG shipping import terminals, gas storage, pipeline and generating station development. Additionally, the development of knowledge economy hubs is helping to attract high end value employment in information technology applications and research to the Swansea Bay and Pembrokeshire areas.

5. 1.25 The whole of South West Wales is part of the West Wales and the Valleys area that is eligible for European Union Structural Fund support. This is because prosperity is 75% or less than the European Union average and economic inactivity is one of the main reasons for this.8 The Lisbon Agenda and targets focus on increasing employment opportunities and reducing economic inactivity. Improving access can help support these objectives.

6. 1.26 Within the region however, there are significant disparities in terms of the distribution of areas with high scores for indices of multiple deprivation (See Figure 1.5 on page 9). The degree to which deprivation is the result of poor access varies widely and action to improve access and transport must be based on a rigorous analysis of the facts and not on general assumptions. Appendix D sets out key facts on the South West Wales Economy

7. 1.27 Working in Partnership - SWWITCH has taken great care and invested a lot of time in engaging with a wide range of stakeholders in the development of the RTP. This has not been restricted to specific sections of the RTP, but has been integral to the whole process. The engagement process started in June 2006 and the latest consultation was carried out in with Key Stakeholders in November 2008.

Figure 1.5 – Indices of Multiple Deprivation - South West Wales 2005

Source: Welsh Assembly Government Statistical Directorate

1. 1.28 In addition to workshop sessions, SWWITCH has used other means of engagement. For example, a number of smaller scale consultations carried out electronically, predominantly with stakeholders who had attended previous consultation sessions, or with those unable to attend the workshops. SWWITCH also publishes a quarterly newsletter to inform a very wide range of stakeholders regarding the development of the RTP and to encourage feedback. The SWWITCH approach to participation forms an important part of the WelTAG appraisal of the RTP.

1.1.29 SWWITCH has also taken account of the results of previous relevant surveys conducted by SWWITCH. In particular:

. • Public Transport User Satisfaction surveys 2005

. • Citizens’ Panel surveys in 2007 – examining the transport views and priorities of statistically representative groups of residents across the region

. • Travel Pattern research in 2005/6 – this involved more than 2000 households completing seven day travel diaries and answering questions about travel habits and priorities (see Appendix E for more details)

1. 1.30 The RTP guidance referred to in 1.7 above set out a clear process (in stages) for developing the RTP. SWWITCH has used each stage as an opportunity to work with stakeholders, teasing out issues along the way and helping to generate better awareness of the aspirations and concerns of other stakeholders. The stages of developing the RTP and the stakeholder engagement are shown in Figure 1.6 on page 11.

2. 1.31 SWWITCH plans to continue involving stakeholders in developing the monitoring framework and the detailed planning and delivery of projects (where appropriate) and also as part of the ongoing process of annual progress reporting on the RTP.

. • Road traffic volumes in the region have grown considerably over the last decade resulting in pressures in terms of unreliable journey times, increased congestion, reduced air quality, increased noise, vibration and carbon emissions. Air pollution, in particular can have a significant impact on public health. There is currently only one designated transport related Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) in South West Wales, the Hafod (Swansea) Air Quality Management area, which was declared in 2001, due to the level of NO2 associated with traffic congestion. Further assessments are taking place across the region and it is likely that additional AQMAs will be declared due to increased traffic flows and congestion. Appendix H contains details of a baseline mapping of traffic flows and congestion

. • Road safety issues raise public concerns and whilst there has been a general reduction in serious injuries and deaths from road traffic collisions, there are wide variations across the region and for particular road user categories

Figure 1.6 – RTP Stages and Engagement

. • Car Ownership and use has increased rapidly although there are disparities across South West Wales. Those with cars are able to participate in a far wider range of opportunities than those reliant on public transport, walking or cycling

. • Public Transport provision broadly matches population distribution with higher frequency services and better coverage to the south and east of the region where the majority of the population lives, and less extensive provision in the more sparsely populated rural areas. Rail, bus and coach services are provided by private sector companies through a mixture of commercial operation and subsidised services. Physical access to bus and rail services and rolling stock remains a barrier to mobility impaired in some locations

. • Freight operation is an essential contributor to the economy but is planned and delivered by the private sector within European and UK legislative processes

. • Ports and Shipping facilitate the movement of passengers and freight to and from the region and are a critical link in the national supply chain network

. • There are three small Airports in the region: Swansea, Pembrey and Withybush. They do not currently play a strategic role or provide scheduled services, but they all have the potential to be developed to serve small niche markets for business and leisure travel

Figures 1.7 to 1.10 show the key transport networks and interchanges in the region.

Figure 1.7

Strategic Road
Network

Fig 1.8
Rail Network

Fig 1.9

Strategic Bus
Network

Fig 1.10

Key Transport
interchanges

Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment

1. 1.34 The RTP guidance requires consortia to carry out a Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment (SLAA). This is intended to help identify areas of poor access to key services and facilities across the region. Good access can be provided by delivering services where people need them or by ensuring they have easy and affordable access to services.

2. 1.35 In order to monitor accessibility in a consistent way with WAG and other consortia, SWWITCH has used the Accession™ model. This is a computer mapping based model which is able to produce plans showing coloured contours representing the journey times to and from key services and facilities by inputting public transport information and average journey times for car journeys. Generally, two sets of maps are produced for each service destination showing journey times by car and by public transport to allow a comparison of the times it takes to travel by each mode. The process does not differentiate between those bus and rail services which are fully accessible and those which are not, so those whose mobility impairments preclude public transport (unless fully accessible vehicles are available) may have significantly poorer access than that shown in this assessment.

3. 1.36 The outputs from the SLAA are a series of maps and supporting data which link the spatial contours of the maps to actual numbers of residents affected by poor access to a specific service or facility within in a specified time band. More information on the development and results of the SLAA, including all the mapping, is shown in Appendix J and key results of the assessment are shown in Table 1.1(page21). Examples of the maps produced for car and public transport to one service destination are shown on page 18 (Figures 1.11 and 1.12).

4. 1.37 The results were used to consult with stakeholders and to determine the best way to address the poor access identified. Improved transport may not always be the appropriate solution, for example where it is possible to adjust hospitals or surgeries based appointment times to suit available public transport links. The consultation resulted in a prioritisation of the access problems as shown in Table 1.2 (page 22).

5. 1.38 The SLAA has enabled SWWITCH, in consultation with Stakeholders, to adopt an Accessibility Strategy as one of the building blocks of the RTP. The assessment has also contributed to the analysis of problems and opportunities as described on pages 19 - 20.

Key Connectivity between Key Settlements

1. 1.39 As part of the RTP process and also to support the WSP, SWWITCH has developed the Key Connectivity diagram to provide a quick insight into how easy it is to travel to and between settlements by public transport. The graphs do not provide an answer, nor are they a complete record of connectivity at any time or place within a settlement. However, they do provide a snapshot and they help to highlight particular problems and where more investigation might be needed.

2. 1.40 The full connectivity report is shown in Appendix K. It concludes that Swansea is the key settlement which has the best connectivity in the region and that generally the further west and north a key settlement is, the lower the level of connectivity. This pattern mirrors the population density and thus the pattern of public transport

provided. The key connectivity graph for Swansea is shown as an example in Figure

1.13 on page 19.

Figure 1.12 – Accessibility to all Hospitals by Car Figure 1.13 – Swansea: Frequency of public transport to all other Key Settlements

Analysis of Problems and Opportunities

1. 1.41 SWWITCH has used all the background research that has contributed to our understanding of current transport issues, including the SWWITCH Travel Pattern Research and the Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment, to identify the current problems with transport and access and how to develop current opportunities in the future.

1.1.42 This process has been enabled, strengthened and validated by extensive consultation to encourage users, providers and planners of transport to endorse, challenge or add to the identified problems and opportunities as shown in Figure

2.1.14 on page 23.

3.1.43 A full list of the Problems and Opportunities identified in the consultation workshops are set out in Appendix L. These form a part of the WelTAG appraisal and are summarised below:

. • Poor access to employment opportunities

. • Poor linkages/integration between transport, planning and economic development

. • Poor access to health care

. • Frequency of bus services poor

. • Poor quality of buses – access, comfort etc

. • Frequency of train services poor

. • Public transport fares high, lack of ticketing options

. • Lack of alternative modes and information on them

. • Quality of interchanges (stations/stops etc) poor

. • Poor integration between transport modes and services

. • Incomplete cycle network

. • Poor access (by all modes) to employment opportunities and healthcare services

. • Poor integration at policy level and more operationally between and within modes and services

. • Public transport – need to improved frequencies, more affordable fares, more passenger friendly information and better, more accessible vehicles

. • Poor quality interchanges

. • Need for improved alternative forms of transport and related information and publicity

Table 1.1 – Key Results of the Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment

21

Table 1.2 – Prioritising Accessibility Issues Figure 1.14 – Engagement Sources and Key Issues Emerging

Service or Facility

Accessibility in

Rating

Priority for Action (identified

 
 

Area with worst access

Worst affected

   

Group

 

through

 
       

consultation)

Further or

Rural areas in north

Young People

Medium

High

Higher

and far west of

and those on

   

Education

SWWITCH

low incomes

   

Employment

Rural areas and central and northern Carmarthenshire and

Low income Young People Those with

Medium /Good

High

 

Pembrokeshire

Limiting long term illness

   

Health

• All hospitals – Carmarthenshire and

Older people Those with

Poor/ Medium

Medium

 

Pembrokeshire • Main hospitals – Rural areas

Limiting long term illness

   
 

• GP surgeries – Rural

     
 

areas

     

Food Retail

• Supermarkets – Rural areas

Those with Limiting long

Medium /Good

Low

 

• Local Centres –

term illness

   
 

Rural areas

     

Leisure

Dependent on

Older People

Good

Low

activities

individual destination

Young People

   

1.46 The RTP recognises that transport is generally a means to an end; people travel to gain access to services and facilities. The demand for travel is thus largely determined by land use patterns and how services are delivered by the private and public sector. This mutual interaction emphasises the importance of partnership and joint planning. The cross cutting issues include:

. • Spatial planning: the development of the Wales Spatial Plan has been an important development in Wales which recognises land use and access interrelationships. SWWITCH has provided important input at all levels to the three Spatial Plan areas influencing SWWITCH, as set out above (paragraphs 1.11 – 1.15)

. • Land use planning: the analysis of problems and opportunities has highlighted the historical lack of integration between land use and transport planning and operations. The development of Local Development Plans provides the opportunity to acknowledge and improve the interrelationship. The Land Use Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraphs 3.24 – 3.31) sets out the SWWITCH approach

. • Car parking policies can have a significant impact on travel choices. The Parking Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraphs 3.49 – 3.60) sets out the SWWITCH approach

. • Health policies: the SWWITCH Travel pattern research indicates that 4.3% of personal journeys in the SWWITCH area were health related. However, although this is a relatively small proportion, these journeys are particularly important for people at vulnerable stages of their life. The Strategic Level Accessibility Analysis (see above paragraphs 1.34 – 1.38 and Appendix J) assessed access to hospitals. More detailed work will follow on access to local health facilities. SWWITCH authorities are now working much more closely with NHS organisations due to the shared recognition of the importance of access to health facilities

. • The links between car dependency and fitness and health are increasingly recognised. The SWWITCH approach to encouraging healthier lifestyles is set out in the Smarter Choices Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraphs 3.39 – 3.48) and the Walking and Cycling Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraphs 3.84 – 3.90)

. • Educational policies: Educational policies such as parental choice and school rationalisations have significantly contributed to increased travel to school by car and peak hour congestion. The SWWITCH approach to encouraging active travel to school and college is set out in the Smarter Choices Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraph 3.41) and the Road Safety Strategy 2010 -2015 (paragraphs 3.61 – 3.67)

. • Private sector policies: Economic develop is an important priority for South West Wales. SWWITCH will work with partners to ensure that new developments are accessible for employees, shoppers and visitors

. • Environmental policy: reducing the damaging environmental impact of traffic is a key element of the RTP and the component strategies

. • Cross boundary policies and developments: SWWITCH has important links with the TraCC region, to north and the Sewta region to the east. SWWITCH liaises with both consortia on significant developments and common issues. There are strong north south links, both bus and road, between north Pembrokeshire/ northern Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion and between Swansea – Pontardawe – Ystradgynlais on the Swansea Valley route. Furthermore the Heart of Wales rail service provides an important link between Swansea/Llanelli and Mid Wales. The predominant cross boundary links in South Wales are along the M4 corridor and the South Wales line. In addition there are important links between Port Talbot and Maesteg and along the A465 corridor.

1.47 In seeking to facilitate delivery of the aspirations of One Wales, the Wales Spatial Plan and the Wales Transport Strategy, and based on the context provided by current transport issues and wide stakeholder engagement, SWWITCH Joint Committee has adopted the following Vision for the RTP.

Vision for the South West Wales RTP

1.48 The vision has been developed into seven specific objectives for the RTP, firmly based on the analysis of problems and opportunities set out in Appendix L. These provide a framework for the strategy and programme and thus ensure that actions, whether policy or project based, are appropriate responses to problems. The objectives are based on supporting economic development, reducing social exclusion and creating more equal opportunities by removing the barriers that prevent individuals from accessing services and facilities. RTP objectives are also required for:

. • The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) - which is a statutory requirement for the RTP

. • Welsh Transport Planning and Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG) - which is based on an objective approach to planning and delivery

1. 1.49 The RTP objectives set out what SWWITCH needs to do to achieve its vision for transport. They have provided the basis for examining alternative options, developing a long term strategy and determining the merits of transport projects which make up the five year and longer term programmes.

2. 1.50 The draft RTP had nine objectives. Taking into account consultation responses, SWWITCH has reduced these to seven objectives which provide a sharper focus to guide implementation.

7. To improve road safety and personal security in South West Wales

1. 1.51 Tables 1.3 and 1.4 (pages 29 and 30) show the synergy between the RTP objectives and WTS outcomes and strategic priorities, which are set out in Table 1.5 (page 31). These interrelationships form part of the WelTAG assessment of the RTP.

2. 1.52 The RTP objectives also match closely the aspirations set out in the Wales Spatial Plan 2008 Update. Although three Spatial Plan areas impact on the SWWITCH region, all three areas focus on improving sustainable accessibility, both internally and externally.

1.1.53 SWWITCH recognises that achieving the vision and objectives for transport in South West Wales is going to take time. It will require:

. • Substantial new investment of capital and revenue funding coupled with improvements in project management and reporting procedures

. • A significant improvement in monitoring and evaluation of transport investment

. • A shift in public attitudes to travel and modal choices, particularly to address carbon reduction targets

. • Changes to taxation, competition law, planning and transport policy at a national level to encourage more sustainable travel

. • More effective partnership and integration between a range of public, private and voluntary organisations and a real emphasis on “Making the Connections”

1.54 To focus on some key priorities SWWITCH has adopted the following key priorities for the first five year RTP:

1.55 Main opportunities which emerged from RTP specific consultation exercises were:

. • Continuing with and expanding SWWITCH Travel Plan work to encourage more organisations to address the impact of the travel they generate

. • Introducing more Park & Ride sites and services to reduce congestion in town and city centres and at seasonal attractions where appropriate

. • Developing further work on a range of community transport schemes to improve access to health care, leisure, shopping and social activities to help reduce social exclusion and isolation associated with limited mobility and/or rural isolation

. • Developing more innovative long term opportunities, including encouraging social enterprise schemes, to promote more sustainable travel in particular to employment and training and to access health care

. • Developing regional campaigns and branding for sustainable transport options where appropriate

. • Working with WAG to secure appropriate transport powers in respect of public transport and utilising appropriate mechanisms like Quality Bus Partnerships and Punctuality Improvement Partnerships

. • Supporting progress on developing multi modal and discounted ticketing using new technology

. • Using proposed Network Rail replacement of the Loughor Viaduct to secure the re-doubling of the railway line west of Swansea and ultimately improved rail services

. • Continuing and expand cycleway/footway development to provide sustainable options for travel and support the growing health concerns

. • Developing and sustaining more road safety measures and education

. • New Technology – IT solutions to demand for travel (for example fast broadband access to facilitate home working) and to encourage more efficient and environmentally friendly travel

1.56 There are also some key future challenges to be considered and addressed over the next few years including:

. • Reducing reliance on fossil based fuels. The International Energy Agency warns that “current trends in energy supply and consumption are patently unsustainable – environmentally, economically and socially – they can and must be altered.”9 The potential prospect of Peak Oil in the medium term poses a major challenge to the transport sector due to its heavy reliance on oil based fuels

. • Addressing the recommendations set out in the Eddington Review which focus on improving the performance of cities, city regions and international gateways

. • Responding to the issues of access deprivation in rural areas and the impact on the participation in, and quality of, active community life of rural residents

. • Funding opportunities for transport and how to tap into other sources including those from the private sector

9 International Energy Agency press release, 12 November 2008

Table 1.3 – RTP objectives appraised against Wales Transport Strategy outcomes

29

Table 1.4– RTP objectives appraised against Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

SWWITCH Regional Transport Plan

 

Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

 

Objectives

     

Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions and other environmental impacts

 

Integrate local transport

Improve access between key settlements and sites

Enhance international connectivity

Increase safety and security

1. To improve access for all to a wide range of services

           

and facilities including employment and business,

           

education and training, health care tourism and leisure

           

activities.

           

2. To improve the sustainability of transport by improving the range and quality of, and awareness about, transport options including those which improve health and well being

           

3. To improve the efficiency and reliability of the

           

movement of people and freight within and beyond

           

south west Wales to support the regional economy

           

4. To improve integration between policies, service

           

provision and modes of transport in south west Wales

           

5. To implement measures which make a positive

           

contribution to improving air quality and reducing the

           

adverse impact of transport on health and climate

           

change, including reducing carbon emissions

           

6. To implement measures which help to reduce the

           

negative impact of transport across the region on the

           

natural and built environment including biodiversity

           

7. To improve road safety and personal security in

           

south west Wales

           

Table 1.5 – Wales Transport Strategy Outcomes and Strategic Priorities

Wales Transport Strategy Outcomes

Social

. • Improve access to healthcare

. • Improve access to education, training and lifelong learning

. • Improve access to shopping and leisure facilities

. • Encourage healthy lifestyles

. • Improve the actual and perceived safety of travel

. • Improve access to employment opportunities.

Economic

. • Improve connectivity within Wales and internationally

. • Improve the efficient, reliable and sustainable movement of people

. • Improve the efficient, reliable and sustainable movement of freight

. • Improve sustainable access to key visitor attractions

Environmental

. • Increase the use of more sustainable materials in the maintenance of Wales’ transport assets and in the provision of transport infrastructure

. • Reduce the impact of transport on greenhouse gas emissions

. • Adapt to the impacts of climate change

. • Reduce the contribution of transport to air pollution and other harmful emissions

. • Improve the positive impact of transport on the local environment

. • Improve the effect of transport on our heritage

. • Improve the impact of transport on biodiversity

Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

. • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental impacts from transport

. • Integrating local transport

. • Improving access between key settlements

. • Enhancing international connectivity

. • Increasing safety and security

31

2.0 CHAPTER TWO – OPTIONS AND LONG TERM STRATEGY

1. 2.1 Following the adoption of RTP objectives and key priorities, SWWITCH moved onto the next stage of the RTP process as set out in the Guidance. This involved an examination of various transport planning approaches that could be used to achieve the objectives. SWWITCH developed a number of future planning scenarios to encourage discussion at stakeholder workshops on alternative strategy approaches and which of these would provide the best match with the RTP objectives.

1.2.2 The planning scenarios or options devised were based on best practice examples from across the UK and beyond. The process is described in detail in Appendix F and briefly below. The scenarios/options were as follows:

. • Car is King – This scenario considers developing a strategy and programme to support car use

. • Hearts & Minds – This scenario considers developing a sustained pro active campaign relating to the promotion of behavioural change to encourage more use of sustainable travel and to reduce non-essential travel

. • Demand Restraint – This scenario considers using a range of measures to restrict private car use

. • Planning the Future – This scenario would be achieved predominantly through a more integrated approach to land-use planning, with new developments designed and located to reduce the need for the private car and encourage the use of more sustainable transport

. • Public Transport Rules – This scenario would focus on developing improved public transport services, including park and ride, express and innovative services (include community transport) and enhanced interchange and ticketing facilities, which would attract current car users

. • Mix & Match – This option recognises that a mixture of strategies is needed to improve access and transport in a diverse region such as South West Wales

2.3 SWWITCH recognised that in view of the diversity of the region it was unlikely that any one of these options would be appropriate for the whole region. To stimulate debate SWWITCH asked stakeholders to consider which option would achieve most progress towards RTP objectives in three distinct types of area:

. • The City Centre – this was considered as sufficiently distinctive in terms of type of problem to be considered on its own and was based on Swansea City Centre

. • Key settlements and their hinterlands

. • All other areas to include villages and rural hinterlands

1. 2.4 The most important part of the option assessment stage was the debate these workshops stimulated and the sharing of ideas and opinions amongst a wide range of internal and external stakeholders. This resulted in a better understanding of the differing needs of various service planners, users and providers.

2. 2.5 However, the conclusion was that no single approach was considered to be likely to work across the region and the “mix and match” approach was therefore seen to be the only realistic option for South West Wales.

Long Term Strategy

1. 2.6 The next stage of the RTP development was consultation on a long term strategy to deliver the RTP objectives and again more detail on the process is included in Appendix F

2. 2.7 Briefly, stakeholders at fourteen separate workshops were asked to consider different elements which could make up the SWWITCH long term strategy. Some basic strategy elements were provided for participants who were invited to add additional ones if they felt that these were also required. Working in small groups, they were then tasked with prioritising the elements according to their importance in delivering the RTP objectives.

1.2.8 The results from all the workshops were aggregated and the overall priorities from the stakeholder workshops are shown in Figure 2.1 (see page 35). In practical terms all of these elements are important to long term aspirations to provide improved access and to deliver the RTP objectives. However, some of the stakeholder priorities relate to initiatives which SWWITCH cannot directly influence, but must work in partnership to address or must lobby for necessary action by other appropriate organisations. In particular these include:

. • Sustainable freight, including modes, fuels etc (largely led by the private sector, with Government influence in terms taxation and grants)

. • Rail infrastructure and service enhancements (UK and Welsh Assembly Government)

. • Strategic east/west road links (Welsh Assembly Government)

. • Development of ports and shipping (private sector and UK Government)

2.9 In addition there are some prioritised long term strategy elements which are directly related to revenue expenditure. Whilst, the RTP will act as a framework to secure capital investment which will have consequential revenue implications, there are many other essential initiatives which are essentially revenue in nature. These include:

. • Maintenance of roads, cycleways and footways

. • Travel information and raising travel awareness

. • Improvements to bus services in terms of quality, reliability, penetration and vehicle quality)

. • Innovative passenger transport development (e.g. demand responsive services or social enterprise transport schemes)

2.10 SWWITCH developed the following long term strategy based on the results of workshops, taking into account the:

. • One Wales Agenda

. • WTS strategic priorities and outcomes

. • WSP aspirations

. • RTP objectives

Land UsePlanning Integration ImprovingTransport Interchange

Maintenance ofroads, cycleways, footways etc

Road Safety Improved linkage between main centres frastructure & services

StrategicBusCorridor Development Raising Travel Awarene\ Improving Information

Innovativepaenger transportdevelopment Travel Planning

ParkingStrategyDevelopment Integration betweenmode

Strategic East/West RoadLinks

Rail

Park& Ride Local RoadDevelopmentImprovements Demand Management Integrated ticketing developments Sustainable Freight(Rail/Shipping/CleanerFuels, Vehicles)

Development ofports & shipping Financial incentive to change Accessfor Users with Disablties Urban/Rural Links

Environmental Concern

Better links between Tourism & Transport

Cross Border Service North/South Road Links Sustainable Transport for amodes Extension of conceiionary travel schemes

Development ofcycling& walking in

35

. • Swansea Urban area

. • Strategic corridors

. • Key settlements and their hinterlands

. • Rural areas

Swansea Urban area –High quality seamless public transport services, including Bus Rapid Transit routes, with integrated ticketing and interchange facilities, will be developed to provide links to and through the city centre thereby linking other key destinations and corridors. A comprehensive network of pedestrian and cycle routes and a pedestrian and cycle friendly city centre will be developed. The highway network will be managed by a combination of improved alternatives to single car occupancy, traffic management to minimise congestion, improved air quality and enhanced road safety and a parking strategy which supports city centre vitality and viability, but discourages commuting by car. New development sites and corridors, such as the Fabian Way will be planned so that they can be effectively served by public transport and walking and cycling facilities. All these measures to be supported by intensive use of smarter choices measures, including comprehensive personalised travel planning.

Strategic Road, Rail, links

• Improving journey time reliability of highway network • High Street Station redevelopment • Improving the range of rail opportunities from High Street, Llansamlet and Gowerton stations • Completion of Valleys Cycle Network

Bus Corridors

• Development of high quality bus corridors (Bus Rapid Transit) on key routes, which provide bus priority and enhanced passenger facilities and information

Promoting Integration

• New Quadrant interchange and enhanced High Street station • Integrated public transport ticketing • improved provision for pedestrians and cyclists • A fourth park and ride site serving West Swansea and expanded existing park and ride sites, together with services serving other key employment sites, in addition to the city centre • Development of park and share facilities • Expansion of car clubs • Comprehensive pedestrian and cycle network • Pedestrian and cycle friendly city centre and other local centres

Safety

• Create a safer environment for all road users through selective road

   

safety improvements

   

• Work with established community partnerships to educate on road safety issues

   

• Work with bus operators to develop a area wide recording system for reporting anti social incidents on public transport

   

• Create a safer environment for all road and rail users

Information

 

• Develop and distribute more targeted information on alternative forms of transport in a wide range of formats

   

• Further development of travel planning for schools, workplaces and new residential developments

   

• Personalised travel planning

   

• Sustainable transport map

Linkages betwkey settlements

een

• Improved public transport routes serving Key Settlements, Strategic Employment sites and developing corridors such as Fabian Way

   

• Car sharing, walking and cycling links

Efficiency of highway network

the

• Parking availability and pricing • Traffic management measures to make the best use of the existing

   

network

   

• Demand restraint measures

Strategic Corridors – improving connectivity in and beyond the region to ensure the efficient and effective movement of people and freight by private and public transport and by road and rail. Supporting the development and use of more sustainable long distance travel options for freight and passengers through partnership working with public and private sector organisations. Improving safety for all modes and especially more vulnerable road users. Improving information and awareness of options for travel.

Strategic Road, Rail, links

• Improving the east /west and north /south corridors • Enhancing the capacity and reliability of the rail network and the range of journey opportunities including removing the constraints caused by single line working to the west of Swansea and working to improve journey opportunities and reduce journey time to Cardiff and London • Improving interchange points and bus stops to facilitate physical access, comfort and information

Bus Corridors

• Specific enhancements on strategic bus corridors to access, facilities and information • Promoting public transport use for commuting between key settlements and to and from local and strategic employment sites

Promoting Integration

• Enhanced interchanges to facilitate connections between long distance and local transport networks • Standard quality for specific categories of interchange • Supporting whole route information and ticketing development for public transport options

Safety

• Specific area/junction road safety enhancements to facilitate safe and efficient movement • Support development of initiatives and awareness raising on safer road use and for public transport users

Information

• Specific corridor booklets with a wide range of information • Raise awareness on opportunities for alternative modes of travel and for car sharing system

Linkages between key settlements

Efficiency of the highway network

. • Feeder services to bus corridors from smaller communities and strategic employment sites

. • Strategic utility cycling route development

. • Traffic management targeted to support reliable journey times

. • Road space reallocation at key junctions to support public transport

. • Encourage car sharing for longer distance commuting journeys and to public transport nodes

. • Examining the role of Park and Share sites near major highway junctions

Key Settlements and their hinterlands – Improving access within and between key settlements and also from key settlements to strategic employment sites thus ensuring more equitable and sustainable access to a range of important services and facilities. Encouraging the use of sustainable travel through a range of Smarter Choices techniques and raising awareness on and improving the quality of alternatives to private car usage where appropriate and supporting car sharing where alternatives are not feasible.

Strategic Road, Rail, links

• Improving the reliability of the highway network between key settlements • Railway Station redevelopment to provide improved access by al travel modes • Improved bus stations or major interchange nodes

Bus Corridors

• Create a network of strategic bus corridors to serve key settlements and link them to each other • Link residents/visitors to key settlements through a range of public transport options including unconventional services

Promoting Integration

• Enhance the quality and accessibility of town centre and key interchanges to facilitate modal shift • Improve facilities for cycling and cycle parking to encourage more utility cycling • Work with public transport operators and major service providers to facilitate use of public transport for work, education and health visits

Safety

• Create a safer environment for all road users through selective road safety improvements • Work with established community partnerships to educate on road safety issues • Work with the industry to develop a area wide recording system for reporting anti social incidents on public transport

Information

• Develop and distribute more targeted information on alternative forms of transport in a wide range of formats • Improve signage and car park information in key settlements

Linkages between key settlements

• Develop a network of local bus services to improve access to key settlements and local and strategic employment sites • Provide a range of options for access to main centres of health care provision

Efficiency of the highway network

• Develop and manage parking in Key Settlements to facilitate good access, the local economy and reduce car dependency • Traffic management to facilitate reliable journey times and discourage unnecessary car traffic in town centres • Encourage car sharing through Smarter Choices and organisational travel planning

Rural areas – Improving access from rural areas to a wide range of essential services and facilities in the larger key settlements and local service centres. Encouraging, where appropriate, more sustainable travel through greater public transport use, walking, cycling, car sharing, and the development of quality interchanges between the various travel modes. At the same time the strategy recognises that many dispersed rural communities will continue to rely on private motoring. Access from these areas will be facilitated by a hierarchy of services, routes and facilities which encourage modal transfer where appropriate.

Strategic Road, Rail, links

• Improve the reliability of links along the strategic highway network between key settlements • Maintain and seek opportunities to develop improved rail services which serve rural hinterlands from key settlements and local service centres

Bus Corridors

• Develop improved local service links to strategic bus corridors and key settlements using a range of innovative passenger transport services

Promoting Integration

• Improve the quality of local interchange points within the context of the rural environment • Work with partners to encourage the use of Accessibility planning in the process of planning service delivery • Work with partners to develop a range of options to secure good access to essential services and facilities from rural areas

Safety

• Develop community based packages of road safety enhancements • Work with existing community groups to raise awareness on safety issues associated with transport

Information

• Develop community based information on a range of transport options • Develop improved information on city/town park and ride facilities where appropriate

Linkages between key settlements

• Improve access between and to key settlements, strategic employment sites and strategic bus corridors using appropriate public transport services • Improve access to strategic employment sites through innovative measures including social enterprise schemes

Efficiency of the highway network

• Encourage more car sharing in local communities and examine the opportunities for car sharing parking at or near to major highway interchanges • Use localised, small scale traffic management where appropriate to avoid delays to public transport vehicles

1. 2.14 Tables 2.1 and 2.2 (on pages 41 and 42) provide an appraisal of the proposed strategy against the WTS Outcomes and Strategic Priorities. These demonstrate that the SWWITCH long term strategy will help to deliver the WTS outcomes within South West Wales. Furthermore, the long term strategy is fully consistent with the WSP’s aspirations for sustainable accessibility and the three WSP Area Strategies which influence the SWWITCH Region.

2. 2.15 Table 2.3 (page 43) assesses the long term strategy against the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) objectives This demonstrates some very positive links as set out in the SEA.

Figure 2.2 – Long Term Strategy Areas of Influence

40

Table 2.1 – RTP long term strategy appraisal match with the Wales Transport Strategy outcomes

         

Wales Transport Strategy Outcomes

     
   

Social

   

Economic

 

Environmental

   

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Long Term Strategy↓

                                 

Improving land use and transportation planning

+++

+++

++

+++

+

+++

N

+++

++

++

N

++

N

++ +

++

N

N

Improving strategic east/west road and rail links

+

+

++

N

N

+++

++ +

++

++ +

+

 

N

N

 

N

N

N

Improving Strategic Bus Corridors

++

++

++

++

+

+++

++ +

++

 

++

N

+

N

+

+

N

N

Promoting integration

+++

+++

+++

+++

++

+++

++

+++

N

++

N

++

N

++

+

+

+

Improving safety in transport

+

++

++

+++

++ +

+

++

+

+

+

N

+

N

N

N

N

N

Providing more and better information

++

++

+++

+++

++

++

++

++

+

++

N

+

N

+

++

N

N

Improving linkages between key settlements and strategic employment sites

+

+

++

++

++

+++

+

++

N

N

N

+

N

N

+

N

N

Improving the efficiency of the highway network

+

+

++

+

++

+++

++ +

+++

++ +

+

N

N

N

 

N

-

-

Key +++ Strong contribution to WTS outcomes ++ Contribution

+ Slight contribution N Neutral impact on WTS outcomes

-Slight negative impact --Negative impact ---Strong negative impact on WTS outcomes

41

Table 2.2 – RTP long Term Strategy appraisal match with the Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

Long Term Strategy

 

Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

 
 

Reducing Greenhouse Gas emissions etc

Integrating Local Transport

Improving access between key settlements and sites

Enhancing international connectivity

Increasing safety and security

Improving land use and transportation planning

+++

++

+++

+

++

Improving strategic east/west road and rail links

 

+

++

+++

N

Improving Strategic Bus Corridors

+

++

+++

+

+

Promoting integration

+++

+++

+++

++

++

Improving safety in transport

N

+

N

N

+++

Providing more and better information

++

++

+++

+

++

Improving linkages between key settlements and strategic employment sites

+

+++

+++

N

++

Improving the efficiency of the highway network

N

N

+

++

N

Key +++ Strong contribution to Strategic priorities ++ Contribution

+ Slight contribution N Neutral impact on Strategic priorities

-Slight negative impact --Negative impact ---Strong negative impact on Strategic priorities

42

Table 2.3 – RTP long term Strategy appraisal match with the Strategic Environmental Assessment Objectives

SEA Objectives→

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Long Term Strategy ↓

Improving land use and transportation planning

+++

+++

+

+

+++

++

++

+

+

+

Improving strategic east/west road and rail links

   

-

N

+

N

-

 

N

-

Improving Strategic Bus Corridors

+

+

N

N

++

+

N

N

N

N

Promoting integration

++

++

N

++

+++

++

++

+++

N

++

Improving safety in transport

+

+

N

N

++

+++

N

+

N

N

Providing more and better information

++

++

+

++

+++

++

+

++

N

++

Improving linkages between key settlements and strategic employment sites

+

+

N

+

++

++

+

+

N

N

Improving the efficiency of the highway network

+

-

N

N

+

+

+

+

N

N

Key +++ Strong contribution to Strategic priorities ++ Contribution

+ Slight contribution N Neutral impact on Strategic priorities

-Slight negative impact --Negative impact ---Strong negative impact on Strategic priorities

43

Summary of RTP Strategic Environmental Assessment Objectives Objective 1: AIR QUALITY - Reduce air pollution emissions from transport Objective 2: CLIMATIC FACTORS (including greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation to climate change) - Reduce transport

related greenhouse gas emissions. Ensure that adequate action is implemented to adapt the transport network to climate change Objective 3: NOISE AND VIBRATION - Minimise noise and vibration from transport Objective 4: BIODIVERSITY, FLORA AND FAUNA - Ensure that biodiversity is protected and enhanced Objective 5: POPULATION (including severance and accessibility) - Provide inclusive access to all services and facilities and reduce

severance

Objective 6: HUMAN HEALTH (including physical fitness and safety) - Protect and promote everyone’s physical and mental wellbeing and safety Objective 7: WATER AND FLOOD RISK - Minimise transport related impacts on water resources, flood plains and areas of flood risk

Objective 8: MATERIAL ASSETS (including capital resources, resource efficiency and waste) - Ensure that natural resources and energy are used efficiently

Objective 9: CULTURAL HERITAGE (including engineering, architectural and archaeological heritage) - Ensure that diverse cultural heritage is protected and enhanced

Objective 10: LANDSCAPE AND TOWNSCAPE (including light pollution) - Ensure that landscape and townscape is protected and enhanced

44

3.0 CHAPTER THREE - RTP POLICIES AND COMPONENT STRATEGIES

Introduction

. • the way in which services are planned and developed

. • the partnership approach to development and delivery

. • the integration between strategies, policies and actions

1. 3.2 SWWITCH has developed clear objectives for the RTP (Chapter 1) and from those objectives, and subsequent stakeholder option generation and appraisal, a long term strategy has evolved (Chapter 2). Set out below are RTP policies which will provide a framework for all SWWITCH activities and projects.

2. 3.3 The policies are set out according to the Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities to which they relate. While there is some overlap (with policies helping to deliver more than one strategic priority) and also some conflicts (where policies could provide a beneficial and detrimental impact on the WTS strategic priorities) there is generally a good match demonstrated. Table 3.1 (on Page 48) appraises the policies against the SWWITCH RTP objectives and the WSP Strategic Priorities, showing a high degree of synergy in both cases. Likewise, the RTP policies are closely allied to Area Strategies for the three WSP areas which impact on the SWWITCH Region.

3. 3.4 The overarching SWWITCH policy is to improve access to facilitate other higher level aspirations and this includes physical access for those with mobility impairments. This will include implementing a range of physical, policy and revenue based options to develop awareness in and uptake of more sustainable forms of transport where appropriate. Where there is no sustainable alternative, for example in deep rural areas or for the mobility impaired (where the car is the only choice), SWWITCH will seek to support safe and reliable access to services and facilities which support a good quality of life.

3.8

3.9

Table 3.1 – RTP Policies appraised against Objectives

Wales Transport Strategy

RTP Policy

   

RTP Objectives

   

StrategicPriority 1

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

E1

++

+++

+

+

+++

++

+

E2

++

+++

+

+

+++

+++

+

E3

+

++

N

++

++

++

N

E4

N

+

+++

+

+++

+++

N

StrategicPriority 2

IT1

++

++

++

+++

+

+

++

IT2

+

+

++

+++

+

+

N

IT3

+

+++

++

+

+

+

N

IT4

+

++

+

+

++

++

+

IT5

++

++

++

+

N

N

N

IT6

+++

++

++

+

N

N

+

IT7

++

++

++

+

+

+

N

StrategicPriority 3

KS1

+++

++

+++

++

++

++

+

KS2

++

+

++

+

N

N

N

KS3

++

+++

+

N

++

++

++

KS4

+

++

++

+

+++

+++

+

StrategicPriority 4

IC1

++

N

+++

++

   

N

IC2

+

++

+++

++

+

+

N

IC3

+

N

+++

++

+

+

N

IC4

+

-

++

++

   

N

StrategicPriority 5

SS1

++

++

+

++

+

+

+++

SS2

++

++

+

++

+

+

+++

SS3

++

+++

+

++

++

++

+++

               

3.10 WAG has asked consortia to identify their priorities for those transport projects which will be delivered through the National Transport Plan, mainly for Rail, Trunk Roads and Revenue expenditure. SWWITCH priorities link closely to the forward programmes for Trunk roads and rail published by the Assembly in December 2008 and are shown below:

Rail Priorities

Rail provides a vital link to, from and within the region. It is essential to securing inward investment and encouraging modal shift for medium and long distance journeys.

Description

Detail

Priority

Improvements to Rail Services West of Swansea

• Redoubling the line west of Swansea to secure improved services to west Wales including • 3 trains per hour between Swansea, Gowerton, Llanelli

1

 

and Carmarthen

 
 

• Hourly services from Carmarthen to Milford Haven

 
 

• 5 trains per day to Fishguard Harbour

 

Improving Rail Services to Cardiff, Bristol and London

• Reducing the journey times to Cardiff, London and beyond • Improving access to and facilities at mainline stations drawing on all sources including National Station Improvement Programme funds and EU Convergence funding

2

Improving the access to and use of rail

• Five trains per day on the Heart of Wales Line • Improving the Swanline service, serving local stations between Swansea and Port Talbot

3

services

• Developing new stations where justified and reviewing the long term role of smaller stations

 
 

• Maintenance and development of the South West Wales Community Rail Partnership

 

Trunk Road Priorities

Trunk Roads provide the main arteries for the flow of people and goods around the region. They are essential to sustain the local and regional economy, to provide more effective national and international connectivity and for the success of road based public transport services connecting key settlements and sites.

Description

Detail

Priority

Trunk Road

• A40 Penblewin to Slebech

1

Commitments

• A40 The Kell

 
 

• A477 St Clears to Red Roses

 
 

• A 40 Llandewi Velfrey to Penblewin

 
 

• A483 Llandeilo bypass

 

M4 and Trunk Road priority measures

• M4 junction improvements to reduce congestion and improve connectivity • Consideration of Park and Share sites near to M4

2

 

junctions • Signalisation of Pensarn roundabout in Carmarthen • A48 at Cross Hands improvements • Trunking of: • A4138 -between M4 and Llanelli

 
 

• A483 - Fabian Way corridor

 

A 40 improvements

• Improvements to the A40 west of St Clears including dualling if the business case is proven

3

 

• Access from the A40 to the proposed Carmarthen west link road

 

Trunking and De- Trunking

• Trunking of: • A485/6 - Carmarthen to Synod Inn

4

 

• A476 between Cross Hands and Ffairfach

 
 

accompanied by a subsequent de-trunking of the A483 from Pont Abraham through Ammanford to Ffairfach/Llandeilo

 
 

• De-Trunking of:

 
 

• A40 Salutation Square to Withybush Roundabout

 

Revenue Priorities

Additional revenue funding is essential to delivering the WSP aspirations, the RTP vision and objectives and the Smarter Choices agenda which will encourage behavioural change and deliver reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Without additional revenue funding the WSP, the WTS and the RTP will fail.

Description

Detail

Priority

Support for existing levels of

• Maintenance funding to ensure that existing facilities are retained in first class condition

1

service

• Maintain current levels of support for existing rail services,

 
 

bus services and community transport schemes in the region

 

Support for improved services

• Increased maintenance funding to include new infrastructure • Improved and additional bus services focusing on delivering the WSP access aspirations and the Accessibility Strategy

2

 

• Rail services – improvements to services in terms of new rolling stock or extra services will require additional WAG revenue funding through the Wales Rail Franchise

 
 

• Development of new unconventional public transport services including community transport schemes and pump priming social enterprise schemes

 

Supporting Behavioural change

• Sustainable Towns scheme development including awareness raising, campaigns and information, Personalised Travel Planning projects

3

 

• Ticketing initiatives

 
 

• Better targeting of the Concessionary fares scheme to meet the needs of young people, job seekers, elderly and disabled people who do not benefit from the current concessionary scheme.

 

Support for pump priming and sustaining capital

• Revenue implications of capital projects like Park and Ride • Revenue impacts of improved parking enforcement

4

projects

   

Component Strategies

1. 3.11 The RTP guidance asks consortia to set out strategies for key delivery areas of access and transport. The following strategies (termed component strategies to indicate they are part of an overarching strategy that is the RTP) will provide a framework within which SWWITCH and local authorities can continue to develop and deliver policies to suit specific local circumstances. Appendix M shows the links between Component Strategies, legislation, strategies and plans.

1.3.12 The following component strategies are shown from paragraph 3.13 onwards :

. • Freight

. • Public Transport

. • Land Use Planning

. • Traffic Management

. • Smarter Choices

. • Parking

. • Road Safety

. • Maintenance

. • Accessibility

. • Walking and Cycling

Freight Strategy 2010 – 2015

1. 3.13 Freight transport plays an essential role in the economy, in terms of delivering raw materials, manufactured goods, food and refuse. SWWITCH prepared a Freight Strategy in 2002, with updated forecasts in 2006.

1.3.14 The prime factor in delivering this Component Strategy is partnership working with the private sector and appropriate grant interventions from Government. The strategy seeks to achieve where appropriate and practicable:

. • The more effective and efficient movement of freight

. • The use of more sustainable modes for the movement of freight

. • A reduction in the distances over which freight is moved

. • Assist Regional Transport Consortia in the development of RTPs

. • Identify and promote factors supporting sustainable transport distribution systems

. • Support Welsh industry and commerce with a reliable and cost efficient network for raw materials, manufactured and consumer goods

. • Anticipate and respond to fundamental changes in the supply-chain and markets

. • Identify weaknesses and constraints in the existing freight network which may

. • Ensure that the needs of the freight industry in the region and in Wales are taken into account in making decisions about rail infrastructure and train path allocation

. • Identify, promote and develop a consistent strategic network of regional signed lorry routes that include local links to local centres of activity such as town centres, ports, other inter-modal freight interchanges, retail and industrial parks and sites

. • Provide parking for road freight transport (locations, facilities required and pricing)

. • Consider specific parking for drivers’ rest areas

. • Seek to mitigate the adverse effects of road freight vehicles on communities and the environment generally by implementing appropriate traffic management measures to deal with intrusive HGV movements

. • Seek to identify pilot freight consolidation centre(s) to serve and enhance the urban environment

. • Encourage appropriate stakeholder partnerships including local and sub-regional Freight Quality Partnerships (FQPs) to mitigate and deal with identifiable issues of concern to local communities and the freight industry

. • Increase the carrying capacity of the railway as cost effectively as possible when developing local schemes, which have a potential impact on freight transport

. • Identify potential options for road-rail freight facilities

. • Ensure that land-use policies seek opportunities for promoting rail freight facilities and that potential sites are protected, particularly for road-rail interchanges

. • Promote use of coastal shipping wherever practicable

. • Promote added-value activities at ports, identifying environmental benefits

. • Identify port locations where new facilities could be developed, including in particular potential multi-modal and port-based inter-modal sites

. • Consider the capacity and availability of the rail network in relation to port-related rail freight

Public Transport Strategy 2010 – 2015

. • More sustainable access and travel choices for everyone

. • Social inclusion for those people without their own private transport

. • A positive contribution to the health and well-being agenda by encouraging those people who are able to use it, to walk farther, often at both ends of their journeys

. • Greater access opportunities for many people with mobility impairments through the use of modern accessible vehicles and demand responsive services

. • A contribution to modal change, particularly within and to urban areas, when well promoted, integrated and good quality public transport services are able to assist in reducing the number of trips made by private motor vehicles, especially through the provision of park and ride services by bus and train

. • Other organisations and utilise the techniques set out in the Smarter Choices component strategy to promote the use of public transport in appropriate circumstances

. • Public transport operators and others to implement its Public Transport Information Strategy (see Appendix N) which seeks to provide targeted, easily understood, readable and more accessible information for everyone about the services available by a variety of media including the distribution of printed leaflets, booklets and timetables, displays at bus stops and train stations, on websites and by real time text messaging

. • Others to undertake research about existing and potential users of public transport to better understand the market and the effectiveness of measures designed to improve services and facilities and attract non-users

. • The bus and rail industries to improve the quality and security of stops, stations and interchanges on the regional bus and rail networks and by setting regional standards

. • Operators to improve the quality of passenger waiting facilities on the bus and rail networks including expansion of the bus priority network, particularly between centres of regional significance (see below)

. • The rail industry, bus operators and other organisations to plan, implement and promote park and ride facilities including the provision of adequate long stay parking at railway stations

. • Operators to promote the use of public transport in appropriate circumstances when planning education transport

. • WAG, the rail industry, bus operators and the voluntary sector to facilitate ease of transfer between public transport services through ticket interavailability and the use and extension of WAG’s smartcard initiatives for all users

. • Transport operators, user groups and other organisation to improve transport interchanges across the region

. • Develop Priority Bus Corridors with enhanced services between key regional centres identified through the Wales Spatial Plan and Local Development Plans (LDPs) processes

. • Develop more sustainable access to and within the countryside and coastal areas by public transport through the Gower Explorer, Pembrokeshire Greenways bus services, Baytrans and other similar initiatives

. • Seek innovative funding packages (both capital and revenue) through the use of informal and statutory Quality Bus Partnerships (QBPs), Quality Bus Contracts (QBCs) and Punctuality Improvement Partnerships (PIPS) to improve the quality of the bus fleet, the services, their coverage and delivery by operators where appropriate

. • Seek more reliable, faster and frequent rail passenger services from Swansea to Cardiff and beyond

. • Seek the re-doubling of the South Wales Mainline pinch-point between Swansea and Llanelli and the enhancement of rail services to the west of the region in particular services to Haverfordwest, Milford Haven, Fishguard Harbour and the Heart of Wales Line

. • Revitalise and develop the South West Wales Community Rail Partnership by engaging with a range of partners including local communities, businesses and tourism providers to improve rail services and facilities

. • Improve Community and Demand Responsive Transport schemes through the development and extension of appropriate voluntary sector and non-profit making initiatives like Transport for Communities to promote access to jobs and services for communities away from the main public transport corridors and for people unable to use bus and train services

. • Improve and extend provision of long distance bus and coach services, particularly where they are able to feed and extend the passenger rail service network

. • Enhance the frequency and coverage of services through increased revenue support

. • Clean, maintain and repair facilities for users to a good standard

. • Improve information and ticketing services for users

. • Undertake market research

Land Use Planning Strategy 2010 – 2015

1. 3.24 The Planning system regulates the use of land, both in terms of the preparation of development plans and also the process for applying for permission for new developments. Land Use Planning has been identified as a key factor in addressing many of the access problems faced in the region. The RTP will set out the framework to ensure improved integration, thereby ensuring that new developments are located in accessible locations and that transport and access implications are fully taken into account.

2. 3.25 Partnership working – SWWITCH will encourage close partnership working between the other regional consortia, employers, retailers, National Parks, health and education providers to encourage a joined up approach to the provision of services and sustainable accessibility. SWWITCH will also encourage close partnership working with

1. 3.26 Planning Gain for transport – SWWITCH will encourage the strengthening of the process of delivering Section 106 agreements by promoting the development of a rationale for addressing planning gain for transport purposes (in particular sustainable transport) , potentially based on a standardized equation which incorporates factors such as development type, size, location and elasticity of demand for development in a given authority area; furthermore SWWITCH will monitor the progress of the Community Infrastructure Levy proposals, and if appropriate promote an approach that supports a consistent effective approach to planning gain for transport purposes.

2. 3.27 SWWITCH will seek to develop strengthened Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) to ensure maximum support for the development of sustainable transport measures. As well as fiscal measures SWWITCH would look to develop SPG in respect of travel plans for particular developments, these would be at the forefront of the planning, design and occupation stages of development and will be supported by a robust monitoring regime.

3. 3.28 Parking -see the Parking component strategy

4. 3.29 Development Control – SWWITCH will encourage a regionally co-ordinated approach to the transport aspects of development control, particularly for schemes of regional/strategic importance which have SWWITCH wide implications.

5. 3.30 Wales Spatial Plan – The WSP sets the spatial framework for development needs within Wales; setting a vision for how each part of Wales should develop economically, socially and environmentally over the next 20 years and will form the basis of National and European funding. SWWITCH will continue to work closely with the WSP groups to ensure the concept of sustainable access is considered as an integral part of strategic development and regeneration.

6. 3.31 Local Development Plans – Each unitary authority in Wales is required to prepare a local development plan (LDP) for its area (this is also the case for the National Parks Authorities in Wales) . These will replace unitary development plans (UDPs), and will consist of a single document, setting out strategic as well as site-specific and development control policies. SWWITCH is already developing appropriate internal processes to ensure that the plans are based on an understanding of the accessibility planning process and that they seek to secure development where sustainable access is present or can be provided as set out in the RTP. It should be noted that the National Parks are developing their own LDP and a similar process of involvement will be adopted by SWWITCH.

7. 3.32 Traffic management has an important role to play in ensuring safe, effective and rational use of the highway network including the coordination of works on the highway to minimise disruption to traffic. The priorities for traffic management within the region

1. 3.33 Existing Streetworks and Highway Legislation - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to ensure the responsibilities for control of activities is consistent and effective; this includes licensing, special events and works activities.

1.3.34 Traffic Management Act (2004) - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to ensure the responsibilities of the Traffic Management Act 2004 and specific Network Management duties (see Appendix P) are met, which will include:

. • Nominated traffic managers are in post

. • New legislation available is considered and introduced as appropriate to ensure expeditious movement of traffic and reduce delays

. • Road safety and the needs of vulnerable road users are considered through an appropriate project management process

. • Where appropriate intelligent and targeted implementation of Civil Parking Enforcement to encourage safe expeditious traffic movement, as well as improving the quality of public transport and ensuring the access needs of people with disabilities (particularly those reliant on car use) are met

. • Promoting a co-ordinated, efficient approach to street works across the region

. • New transport links

. • Improved junctions or alignments

. • Traffic signal controlled junctions

. • Ensuring any new development integrates effectively with the existing highway network (capacity, infrastructure design and signage)

. • Recognising the strategic importance of the trunk road network and where appropriate working with South Wales Trunk Road Agency (SWTRA) to ensure effective integration across the highway network

. • Use Variable Message Signing (VMS) to improve efficiency on the highway network

. • Traffic calming measures

. • Effective use of traffic modelling techniques to ensure that developments take account of the capacity limitations of the highway network

. • Use of appropriate tools to ensure that safety, local air quality and social cohesion are not adversely affected by the proliferation of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) into inappropriate areas

1. 3.36 Road Safety - see Road Safety component strategy

1.3.37 Promoting sustainable transport - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to encourage the use of effective traffic management to promote the use of sustainable transport, including:

. • Bus priority measures

. • Traffic Orders which allow for reliable movement of bus services

. • Increasing road space allocation for walking and cycling

. • Implementing demand restraint measures that discourage car use, particularly in urban areas and congestion hot spots

. • Investigating the use of innovative measures such as car share lanes

. • Designing out rat-runs which encourage inappropriate vehicle movements

. • Liaising with land use planning colleagues to ensure the design of new developments encourages sustainable modal choice

. • Infrastructure and signing that promote integration between transport modes

1. 3.38 Revenue Implications – physical measures implemented to address traffic management issues will require ongoing maintenance support to ensure they remain fit for purpose and effective tools.

2. 3.39 Smarter Choices include a range of techniques for influencing people's travel behaviour towards more sustainable options such as car sharing, public transport, walking and cycling. Effective implementation of Smarter choices measures could reduce urban peak congestion by 21% and national traffic volumes by 11%10. SWWITCH will focus on:

1.3.40 Workplace Travel Plans -These can typically reduce commuter car driving by between 10% and 30%, though the best ones achieve significantly more than that. SWWITCH will:

. • Ensure that all major organisations (> 300 employees) are aware of the benefits of Travel Plans

. • Provide web, personal and paper based guidance and advice on the development, implementation and monitoring of travel plans as appropriate

. • Take advantage of the opportunity to use and develop Personalised travel plans for journeys to work, for example, Traveline Modus Plans

. • Provide training on travel plans and to support “Travel Plan Champions” within organizations

. • Provide support and guidance in order to encourage local organisations to work together and share best practice in travel planning

. • Establish a regional framework for monitoring travel plans

. • Work to link school travel plan work with other Travel Plan initiatives

. • Provide training and networking opportunities to create and nurture “School Travel Plan Champions”

10 Welsh Assembly Government (2007) – Smarter Choices Wales

. • Work with the owners of large attractions to develop and raise awareness on alternative options for accessing their sites

. • Work with tourism and visitor organisations to encourage the development of publicity for more sustainable forms of access.

. • Work with partner organisations such Sustrans to secure funding to facilitate the development of a Travelsmart project in the SWWITCH area

. • Provide advice and guidance and facilitate partnership working across the region on suitable information, discounts, advice and guidance to encourage sustainable travel

. • Work with WAG and partners to secure funding to develop Sustainable town initiatives in the region linked to improvements to public transport, walking and cycling networks

. • Raise awareness of and provide information about the benefit of Sustainable Towns

. • Work with a range of partners and organisations to promote the benefits of car sharing and encourage people to sign up to the regional car sharing scheme, swwitch2share

. • Carry out surveys of users and periodic publicity campaigns to raise awareness and generate interest in car sharing

. • Work with partners to provide park and share sites

. • Use the SWWITCH website, workshops, and conferences to raise awareness of alternatives and highlight environmental, social and economic benefits to the region

. • Develop campaigns in partnership with WAG and other organisations to raise

awareness and promote the benefits of sustainable travel options

1. 3.48 Revenue Implications – The majority of measures within the smarter choices strategy rely on revenue funding streams to support their development and continuation. This is a critical strategy in terms of improving access and reducing carbon emissions from transport and new sustainable sources of revenue support are required.

2. 3.49 The availability of parking has a major influence on transport choices, while the management and control of parking can have a significant impact on the flow of traffic, road safety, the operation of bus services and environmental conditions. The Parking Strategy represents the Regional Parking Framework as required by Planning Policy Wales: TAN 18.

3. 3.50 SWWITCH is a very diverse area, the Parking Strategy/Regional Parking Framework therefore needs to have sufficient flexibility to ensure that it is appropriate for the whole region. The Strategy/Framework consists of the following elements:

4. 3.51 Parking Standards - Adoption of the All Wales Parking Standards and a consistent approach to zoning across the region. This will provide a consistent and yet flexible approach within which each planning and highway authority can provide advice and manage parking demand and provision.

5. 3.52 Parking as a demand management tool - recognises that the availability and price of car parking are key elements in managing car use/congestion in urban areas and a major influence on the choice of means of transport, particularly where other alternative modes are available. In urban areas the intention is to provide more short stay parking to encourage shoppers and visitors and to reduce the volume and/or increase the relative cost of long stay parking. In rural hinterlands the availability of parking at local centres will be important to maintain viability of businesses and sustain the local economy.

6. 3.53 Parking Charges -SWWITCH will work collaboratively to ensure a consistent approach to charging relative to economic activity and the availability of public transport or other alternatives in a specific area.

7. 3.54 Enforcement of Parking - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to adopt a consistent approach to enforcement, including where appropriate the adoption of Civil Parking Enforcement powers and the management of the associated appeals/representations.

8. 3.55 Park and Ride - In appropriate urban locations and other seasonal/visitor attractions SWWITCH will seek to develop Park and Ride schemes which reduce congestion and pollution and encourage more footfall around shops and businesses. SWWITCH will also work with the rail industry to provide adequate car parking at appropriate railway stations serving larger catchment areas to encourage park and ride by rail particularly

for longer distance trips (see also the Public Transport component strategy).

1. 3.56 Parking for People with Disabilities - SWWITCH will continue to work with local and national access groups to ensure that adequate provision for parking for residents and visitors with mobility impairments is provided. Such parking will meet appropriate standards relating to location and size of spaces and the provision of appropriately accessible ticket machines and information.

1.3.57 Other specific parking - SWWITCH will work with other car park providers to ensure that adequate parking in a range of appropriate locations is available for the following needs:

. • Heavy Goods vehicles

. • Coaches

. • Motor Cycles

. • Cycles

1. 3.58 Quality of parking - SWWITCH will work with other car park providers to ensure that the quality of off street parking is improved and that car parks provide safe and consistent signed pedestrian access routes to, from and within the car parks.

2. 3.59 Parking Information - SWWITCH will work with other car park providers to ensure that car park information is improved to help local people and visitors and to reduce unnecessary traffic circulation in urban areas. Particular attention will be paid to the provision of consistent directional signs within and on the approaches to town and other centres and to electronic variable message signs (VMS) indicating the location and available capacity of car parks.

3. 3.60 Revenue Implications - Off street town and city centre car parks can be a source of significant revenue funding. On the other hand park and ride schemes are unlikely to cover their full costs and will require additional revenue funding, at least in the early years. It may be possible for a unified parking account to cross subsidise civil enforcement, car parking and park and ride.

4. 3.61 Road Safety includes a range of techniques to reduce casualties and improve road safety for all users.

1.3.62 Road Safety Engineering - SWWITCH will work collaboratively, using a data-led approach, to implement a range of measures to improve road safety and reduce road traffic collisions including:

. • Speed and red light cameras (in conjunction with the Safety Camera Partnership) and speed activated signs, to encourage safe driving practices

. • Revision of speed limits, particularly in the vicinity of schools, including 20mph limits and zones

. • Traffic calming – see Traffic Management component strategy

. • Development of Home Zones where pedestrians have priority over traffic

. • Junction improvements and, where appropriate, signal controlled junctions

. • Controlled pedestrian crossings.

. • Street lighting

. • Use of physical measures and signage, linked to education and awareness raising, to improve road safety on rural roads, particularly for motorcyclists and equestrians.

. • Highway maintenance – see Maintenance component strategy.

. • Young/new drivers,

. • Older drivers

. • Drink/drug driver awareness

. • Speed awareness

. • School transport use

. • Road safety awareness amongst children and young people

. • Inappropriate use of mobile phones or other electronic equipment

. • Cycle safety

. • Parking

. • Speed limits

. • Drink/drug driving

. • Inappropriate use of mobile phones or other electronic equipment

. • An integrated approach to the development and promotion of safe walking and cycling routes and facilities including secure cycle parking

. • The appropriate use of smarter choices, road safety, traffic calming and personalised planning techniques and interventions

. • The development, in partnership, of evidence based travel plans for the establishments served.

. • Housing and new developments

. • New schools

. • Cycling and pedestrian routes

. • Play areas

. • Public transport interchanges

. • Maintenance

Maintenance Strategy 2010 – 2015

1. 3.68 Highway infrastructure is a valuable asset for Local Authorities and should be maintained for the purposes of safety and protection of the asset. There are also requirements to maintain facilities built for the purposes of supporting public transport use, or walking and cycling which are similarly important to maintain to ensure the service and facility can be used consistently and safely. In the context of the Network Management Duty placed on Local Authorities by the Traffic Management Act 2004, the RTP will focus on the following key areas for the Maintenance Strategy:

1.3.69 Highway Asset Management Plans - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to develop and implement Highway Asset Management Plans in the region for the purpose of:

. • Identifying the condition of the current network

. • Prioritising resources appropriately, including risk assessments

. • Making a case for additional resources.

. • Carriageways

. • Public transport infrastructure

. • Traffic management infrastructure

. • Cycleways

. • Footways

. • Bridges

1. 3.71 Maintenance Indicators -SWWITCH will work collaboratively to develop and report on appropriate and meaningful indicators for highway maintenance and the future adoption of similar indicators in respect of the maintenance of other transport infrastructure

2. 3.72 Developer contributions – see Land Use Planning component strategy

3. 3.73 Co-ordination of works -SWWITCH will work collaboratively to improve the coordination of highway maintenance and improvement works to minimise disruption and abortive expenditure.

4. 3.74 Long term planning for maintenance - SWWITCH will work collaboratively to seek to ensure that the long term maintenance implications of highway schemes (eg traffic calming) are recognised in the planning stages so that appropriate funding can be allocated in future years.

5. 3.75 Revenue Implications – a significant proportion of maintenance expenditure is related to revenue and new and existing facilities require ongoing and sustainable sources of revenue support to ensure they remain safe and effective in the longer term.

Accessibility Strategy 2010 – 2015

1. 3.76 Acessibility is a fundamental part of the RTP. It is strongly connected to the objectives, priorities, long term strategy and RTP policies. It is an integral part of every other component strategy and cannot be delivered in isolation.

2. 3.77 The accessibility strategy for South West Wales is based on the outcomes of the Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment described in Chapter One and the priorities for action set out in Table Two. Improving access for all to a range of services and facilities is important and the priorities are those which are most important in the first five years of the RTP. The focus will be on the following initiatives to deliver the Accessibility Strategy:

3. 3.78 Land Use Planning – see the Land Use Planning component strategy

. • To encourage the use of accessibility planning as part of providing new or amended services for health care, education and training etc. This will ensure that services are located where users can access them and help to reduce increasing single occupancy car usage

. • To encourage the adoption of “access awareness” so that appointments at centralised facilities are matched up to public transport services where appropriate

. • To improve joint working between unconventional transport providers including community transport schemes, patient transport services and social services etc, to improve access to health facilities and services. This means greater flexibility and communication on the part of service providers

1. 3.80 Improving Unconventional Public Transport options – working with a range of partners to develop improved access to jobs and training through demand responsive services, particularly from rural areas of the region. This could be through traditional volunteer based schemes or dial a ride services (through the Community Transport Association) or through the development and expansion of social enterprise schemes to meet wider access needs.

2. 3.81 Non motorised access – to ensure the development and maintenance of coherent, direct and safe walking and cycle access to services and facilities in and beyond local communities. This will benefit a wide range of vulnerable road users and the implementation of routes will be undertaken with appropriate engagement with potential users.

3. 3.82 Information technology – to work with a range of partners to improve access to information through currently available and new technology, either at home or in local community facilities.

4. 3.83 Revenue Implications – revenue funding will be an integral part of the accessibility strategy where support will be required to improve public transport options for access to employment and training and health care facilities and in maintenance of facilities for

walking and cycling and to support the Smarter Choices agenda.

Walking and Cycling Strategy 2010 – 2015

1. 3.84 Walking and cycling offer healthy, accessible, convenient and environmentally friendly ways of making local journeys. SWWITCH prepared a Walking and Cycling Strategy in in 2002. The RTP will focus on the following initiatives in delivering the SWWITCH Walking and Cycling Strategy:

2. 3.85 Promoting Behavioural Change -working with other organisations and utilising the techniques set out in the Smarter Choices component strategy to promote behavioural change and walking and cycling in appropriate circumstances.

3. 3.86 Safe Routes to Communities - see the Road Safety component strategy

1.3.87 Urban Network Development - to establish a hierarchy of walking and cycling routes that more effectively access local residential areas and link them with local, district and town/city centres of employment and activity by:

. • Delivering safe, segregated on-road and off road links for cyclists by extending and completing the existing strategic networks

. • Overcoming barriers to the provision of shorter, more direct links that support the encouragement and promotion of utility walking and cycling trips

. • Ensuring that new developments are fully integrated into the existing and proposed network of walking and cycling routes through effective partnership working and planning agreements ensuring that routes provide good access to transport interchanges with secure facilities for pedestrians and cyclists (including cycle parking).

. • Embracing and incorporating appropriate design and partnership guidance and concepts in the development of links (including secure cycle parking)

. • Working collaboratively with Sustrans (the Sustainable Transport charity) and other organisations, as part of the Connect2, Valleys Cycle Network and other initiatives in developing and promoting appropriate walking and cycling links that connect key settlements with one another and with other communities and have the potential of growing the number of utility trips

. • Developing and promoting walking and cycling routes and public transport services linking key settlements with the countryside for residents and visitors

. • Developing and extending appropriate partnerships between user organisations, community groups, local authorities and transport operators to deliver these schemes

4.0 CHAPTER FOUR – RTP PROGRAMME

Filtering Stakeholder project ideas

1. 4.1 The RTP objectives, long term strategy and policies provide the backbone for improved access and transport in the region. This chapter deals with the specific projects that SWWITCH believes are essential to provide practical improvements that will impact on the lives of residents and visitors and the viability of the local economy now and for the longer term. These projects will also support long term sustainable reductions in carbon emissions.

2. 4.2 To develop the 5 year programme of projects SWWITCH carried out extensive consultation with stakeholders. SWWITCH did not constrain the suggestions of delegates at workshops but they were asked to consider the economic, social and environmental impacts of their project ideas, all within the context of trying to achieve the RTP objectives.

3. 4.3 The original programme consultation process took place between October and December 2007 and more than 300 projects were proposed by stakeholders.

1.4.4 However, quite a large number of these projects did not comply with the RTP guidance either because:

. • They were policy/strategy ideas rather than specific projects

. • They were revenue only projects and the RTP programme is about capital expenditure

. • They were issues or projects which SWWITCH cannot resolve or which SWWITCH would have to lobby on or develop partnerships to deliver

1. 4.7 This filtering process resulted in a programme pool of 120 projects which were published in the Draft RTP in July 2008. A number of other projects evolved during the consultation period and subsequently, reflecting changing priorities and the impact of other external factors on transport demand and supply. In addition a few projects were merged with the result that the total number of projects at the end of the consultation process was still 120.

1.4.8 Prior to the completion of the consultation SWWITCH Joint Committee agreed a prioritisation process for the programme pool based on assessing all the projects against the following elements:

. • Policy fit – RTP objectives and strategy

. • Value for Money – broad brush assessment of cost vs benefits

. • Deliverability – technical, economic, political

. • Regional Impact – did the project have strategic or very localised impacts?

1. 4.10 The first stage of the process was to appraise all the projects against the RTP objectives in order to ensure that the RTP will deliver on the objectives which are critical to addressing problems and maximising opportunities. The proforma used for this prioritisation is shown on Chapter 6 (page 95) and the complete results are shown in Appendix S.

2. 4.11 The second stage of the process was to appraise all 120 projects against the prioritisation mechanism adopted by SWWITCH. Each project was scored out of a potential total of 10 points for each category and the maximum points per project (with the impact of weighting included) is 110 points. The proforma used for this is shown in Chapter 6 (page 95) and again the full results are shown in Appendix S.

3. 4.12 SWWITCH agreed that to create a more realistic five year programme only those projects which scored more than 55% (or more than 60 points) of the total possible would be taken forward for more detailed appraisal. 75 out of the 120 projects which had arisen through consultation scored 60 or more points in the prioritisation process and these are shown in Table 4.1 (page 70)

4. 4.13 These projects are all at different stages of preparation and readiness. Some, for example, are current Transport Grant projects which are already fully designed and underway or ready to start; others require significant preparatory work and there are many other projects in between these two extremes. All of the projects however, have been developed through extensive consultation, have been rigorously tested against the RTP objectives, and through WelTAG stage 1, and will help to deliver the WTS Strategic priorities and the WSP aspirations.

1.4.14 SWWITCH has assessed each of the seventy five projects and determined which are most likely to be capable of delivery within the first RTP and these have been developed into a Five Year Programme for the RTP. The schemes included all score well in terms of:

. • Delivery of WTS strategic priorities

. • Delivery of WSP aspirations

. • Achieving the SWWITCH objectives

. • Value for money

. • Impact on a regional level

Table 4.1 – RTP projects which passed the Prioritisation screening process

Project No. 21 22 1 31 32 55 56 24 68 25 6 17 20 23 35 39 44 47 2 77 10 16 9 14 54 108 15 29 46 98 37 80 100 13 34 92 101 41 42 43 114 52 59 58 110

Project Quadrant Bus Station Interchange Metro Outstanding commitments on Carms TG schemes Port Talbot PDR completion of 1A & B Port Talbot PDR Stage 2 Swansea High Street station Improvements Carmarthen Railway Station Improvements Landore Park and Ride extension Road Safety package Carmarthen Road bus priority measures Carmarthen to Swansea Bus Corridor Package Pembroke to Milford Haven Bus Corridor Haverfordwest to Milford Haven Bus Corridor Swansea west Park and Ride Site Port Talbot to Swansea Bus Corridor Swansea Valley to City Centre Bus Corridor Neath (Llandarcy) to Swansea Bus Corridor Port Talbot to Neath Bus Corridor Cross Hands Economic Link Road Bridge improvements package on A4382 Llanwrda and Lampeter Develop Valleys Cycle Network and Connect 2 routes Haverfordwest to Tenby via Pembroke Bus Corridor Llanelli Bus Station Improvements / Interchange Milford Haven Railway Station Integrated Transport Interchange Fishguard Bus Focal Point Carmarthen Park & Ride Pembroke Dock Bus/Rail Interchange New Road Access to Morriston Hospital Haverfordwest to Tenby via Narberth Bus corridor Introduce sustainable towns concept Lifestyle Changes Walking and Cycling Re-open Goodwick station as a Bus/Rail interchange More variable message signing Southern Strategic Route - A477 Fingerpost Jtn to Energy Site Corridor Port Talbot Parkway City Centre urban cycle network Improve Oystermouth Road corridor (European Boulevard) Haverfordwest to Fishguard via St David’s Bus Corridor Haverfordwest to Fishguard via Letterston Bus Corridor Fishguard to Cardigan Bus Corridor Ammanford to Cross Hands Bus Corridor Tenby Bus Focal Point Llanelli Railway Station Improvements Clynderwen Railway Station Improvements Newcastle Emlyn Bus Focal Point

Project No. 26 86 88 7 111 112 113 3 5 11 33 60 95 8 18 19 38 40 109 72 12 48 36 4 28 30 71 96 27 104

Project Swansea Air Quality Package including Hafod Transport Scheme Park and Share sites close to M4 junctions N/S NCN route in Pembrokeshire North Carms - Ceredigion Link Road Pencader Bus Focal Point Llandeilo Bus Focal Point Drefach Bus Focal Point Carmarthen West Link Carmarthen East Link Northern Distributor Network - Bulford Road Link Baglan Energy Park Link Bridge Neath Railway Station Improvements Capital Enhancement schemes for Community Transport Llanelli Park and Ride Waterston Bypass Blackbridge Access Improvement Multi Modal Freight Facility - Margam Wharf Pontardawe Cross Valley Link Bridge Gowerton Station St. David’s Pedestrian links Pembroke Community Regeneration Scheme Phases 1 &2 Carmarthen Bus Station Access to Kenfig Industrial Estate Ammanford Distributor Road Swansea west Access Road Strategic Bus Corridors around Swansea Tenby Park and Ride Investigate light rail schemes Morfa Distributor Road Coed Darcy southern link

Please note these projects are not in order of priority

4.17 The RTP guidance requires consortia to indicate three separate RTP programmes which help to indentify what can be achieved within specific spending profiles. Legacy schemes are included in the programme but not in the total programme costs on the assumption that they will be top sliced at a national level. The three separate programmes are

. • A do minimum level programme (this would be based on current levels of investment) and for the RTP this would represent an investment of 109m.

. • A second best level (better than do minimum, but not preferred) and this would total 151m

. • A preferred level (designed to achieve objectives and key priorities) and this would total 191m

4.18 The main difference between the three levels of the RTP programme is the speed at which projects and thus objectives can be delivered. There is no fundamental shift between the types of project proposed between the three levels as the balance between the projects is a reflection of the access needs of the region and the most appropriate way

to meet those needs.

1. 4.19 The three outline programmes are shown on Table 4.3 (page 74). Existing Transport Grant supported schemes which are expected to require continuing support beyond the current financial year are highlighted in the table.

1.4.20 Some indication of the expected revenue implications of the programme is also shown and this is based on the following broad assumption:

. • Low revenue costs – up to 15k per annum

. • Medium revenue costs – between 15 and 50K per annum

. • High revenue costs – More than 50k per annum

4.21 Table 4.2 indicates how the tranches in the programme will address the WTS Strategic Priorities and the WSP aspirations. However, because the actual support for strategic priorities will vary between various projects within the tranche or package, this only provides a very broad assessment. More detailed appraisal was carried out as part of the WelTAG assessment (see Chapter 6 and Appendix S).

     

programme

Wales Transport Strategy Strategic Priorities

WSP

Reducing

Integrating

Improving

Enhancing

Increasing

Achieving

 

Greenhouse

Local

Access

International

safety and

sustainable

 

Gas emissions

transport

between Key

Connectivity

security

accessibility

 

and other

 

Settlements

     
 

Environmental

 

and sites

     
 

impacts from

         

RTPtranche

transport

         

Bus corridors

++

+++

+++

N

++

+++

Park and Ride

+

++

++

N

+

++

Interchanges

++

+++

+++

+

++

+++

Healthy and

+++

++

++

N

++

+++

sustainable

           

projects

           

Economic

+

++

++

+++

++

+++

Regeneration

           

Infrastructure

           

Key

+++

Strong

contribution

to

WTS

-

Slight negative impact

 

Strategic/WSP priorities

       

++

Contribution

     

Negative impact

+

Slight contribution

     

Strong negative impact

N

Neutral impact

       

1. 4.22 It is recognised that the RTP programme will need to retain some element of flexibility, even within the first 5 years, in order to take account of new developments and initiatives and unexpected circumstances. The WAG Fabian Way Study completed in April 2009, for example, may result in a new scheme. Other schemes, such as the Gwendraeth Valley Link Road Phase 2, may also become more important in the future. On the other hand, some schemes may be delayed, due, for example, to engineering or land acquisition problems.

2. 4.23 Some schemes in the programme are subject to European Convergence fund applications. Successful applications for some or all the relevant projects will help to reduce the overall cost of those schemes on the RTP programme.

3. 4.24 Table 4.4 (page 81) sets out an outline longer term programme for RTP2 (2015/16 – 2019/20) and RTP3. These are understandably short on detail as they will need to be adjusted and updated throughout the life of the first RTP to reflect on current access needs and requirements (for example when carbon emission targets are introduced for transport).

Do Minimum option - 109 million

Project/scheme

 

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (23%)

 

3,000

5,000

5,000

6,000

6,000

25,000

Park and Ride development (12%)

 

2,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

3,000

13,000

Transport Interchanges (18%)

 

2,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

20,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (7%)

 

1,000

1,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

8,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (39%)

 

3,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

43,000

Totals

 

11,000

22,000

24,000

26,000

26,000

109,000

Option Two – Second best option - 151 million

Project/scheme

 

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (19%)

 

3,000

6,000

6,000

7,000

7,000

29,000

Park and Ride development (11%)

 

2,000

3,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

17,000

Transport Interchanges (15%)

 

2,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

22,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (7%)

 

1,000

1,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

10,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (48%)

 

3,000

15,000

20,000

20,000

15,000

73,000

Totals

 

11,000

30,000

37,000

39,000

34,000

151,000

Option Three – Preferred option - 191 million

Project/scheme

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus Corridors (17%)

3,000

6,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

33,000

Park and Ride development (10%)

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

19,000

Transport Interchanges (14%)

2,000

5,000

5,000

7,000

7,000

26,000

Sustainable and Healthy travel (5%)

1,000

1,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

10,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (54%)

3,000

20,000

30,000

30,000

20,000

103,000

Totals

11,000

35,000

49,000

53,000

43,000

191,000

74

Option One - “Do Minimum” - 109 million

Project/scheme

Revenue Implications

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus corridors tranche 1 Carmarthen to Swansea Swansea Valley to City Centre Llandarcy to Swansea H’fordwest to Tenby via Pembroke

Low

3,000

3,000

3,000

3,000

3,000

15,000

Bus corridors tranche 2 Port Talbot to Swansea Ammanford to Cross Hands H’fordwest to Tenby via Narberth Pembroke to Milford Haven

Low

0

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000 To be continued to next programme

8,000

Bus corridors tranche 3 Port Talbot to Neath H’fordwest to Milford H’fordwest to Fishguard Capital enhancement schemes for community transport

Medium

0

0

0

1,000

1,000 To be continued to next programme

2,000

Park and Ride tranche 1 Landore P& R extension Swansea west P& R Carmarthen P& R

High

2,000

2,000

3,000

3,000

0

10,000

Park and Ride tranche 2 Park and share near M4 Llanelli P&R Tenby P & R

High

0

0

0

0

3,000 To be continued to next programme

3,000

Interchanges tranche 1 Quadrant Bus Station Llanelli Bus Station Milford Haven interchange Port Talbot Parkway Gowerton station

Low

2,000

4,000

3,000

3,000

3,000

15,000

Interchanges tranche 2 Fishguard bus focal point Pembroke Dock interchange Bus focal points at Newcastle Emlyn,

 

0

0

1,000

2,000

2,000 To be continued to next programme

5,000

75

Pencader, Llandeilo and Drefach Carmarthen bus station Llanelli Railway Stn Neath Railway stn Tenby bus focal point

Low

           

Sustainable tranche 1 VCN and Connect 2 phase 1 European Boulevard, Swansea Sustainable towns development N/Sroute in Pembs St Davids Ped links

Medium

1,000

1,000

2,000

2,000

1,000

7,000

Sustainable tranche 2 VCN and connect2 phase 2 Lifestyle changes W&C City Centre urban network of routes

Medium

0

0

0

0

1,000 To be continued to next programme

1,000

PDR phase 2 (top sliced from WAG budget)

Low

10,000

30,518

32,080

30,588

0

103,186

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 1 Outstanding Carms commitments PDR phase 1 Road safety package Cross Hands ELR Southern strategic route - A477 Fingerpost Jct to Energy Site Route Corridor enhancement Baglan Energy Park Link Bridge Carmarthen west

Low

3,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

0

33,000

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 2 Northern Distributor Network – Bulford Road Pembs Community regen project Bridge improvements Carms Waterston bypass

Low

0

0

0

0

10,000 To be continued to next programme

10,000

Totals (excluding legacy schemes)

 

11,000

22,000

24,000

26,000

26,000

109,000

Total including PDR phase 2

 

21,000

52,518

56,080

56,588

26,000

212,186

Shaded cells represent current Transport Grant commitments (legacy schemes)

76

Option Two – Second best option - 151 million

Project/scheme

Revenue Implications

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus corridors tranche 1 Carmarthen to Swansea Swansea Valley to City Centre Llandarcy to Swansea H’fordwest to Tenby via Pembroke

Low

3,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

0

15,000

Bus corridors tranche 2 Port Talbot to Swansea Ammanford to Cross Hands H’fordwest to Tenby via Narberth Pembroke to Milford Haven

Low

0

2,000

2,000

2,000

5,000 To be continued to next programme

11,000

Bus corridors tranche 3 Port Talbot to Neath Capital enhancement schemes for community transport H’fordwest to Milford H’fordwest to Fishguard

Medium

0

0

0

1,000

2,000 To be continued to next programme

3,000

Park and Ride tranche 1 Landore P& R extension Swansea west P& R Carmarthen P& R

High

2,000

3,000

4,000

1,000

0

10,000

Park and Ride tranche 2 Park and share near M4 Llanelli P&R Tenby P & R

High

0

0

0

3,000

4,000 To be continued to next programme

7,000

Interchanges tranche 1 Quadrant Bus Station Llanelli Bus Station Milford Haven interchange Port Talbot Parkway Gowerton station

Low

2,000

5,000

4,000

4,000

0

15,000

Interchanges tranche 2 Fishguard bus focal point Pembroke Dock interchange Carmarthen bus station Bus focal points at Newcastle Emlyn,

Low

0

0

1,000

1,000

5,000 To be continued to next programme

7,000

77

Pencader, Llandeilo and Drefach Llanelli Railway Stn Neath Railway stn Tenby bus focal point

             

Sustainable tranche 1 VCN and Connect 2 phase 1 European Boulevard, Swansea Sustainable towns development N/Sroute in Pembs St Davids Ped links

Medium

1,000

1,000

2,000

2,000

1,000

7,000

Sustainable tranche 2 VCN and connect2 phase 2 Cuty Centre urban network of routes

Medium

0

0

0

1,000

2,000 To be continued to next programme

3,000

PDR phase 2 (Top sliced from WAG budget)

Low

10,000

30,518

32,080

30,588

0

103,186

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 1 Outstanding Carms commitments PDR phase 1 Road Safety package Cross Hands ELR Southern strategic route - A477 Fingerpost Jct to Energy Site Route Corridor enhancement Baglan Energy Park Link Bridge Carmarthen west

Low

3,000

14,000

14,000

2,000

0

33,000

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 2 Northern Distributor Network– Bulford Road Pembs Community regen project Bridge improvements Carms Waterston bypass

Low

0

1,000

5,000

13,000

10,000 To be continued to next programme

29,000

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 3 North Carms Ceredigion link rd Carmarthen East Link Pontardawe Cross Valley link bridge Swansea West Access Road

Low

0

0

1,000

5,000

5,000 To be continued to next programme

11,000

Totals (excluding legacy schemes)

 

11,000

30,000

37,000

39,000

34,000

151,000

Totals including PDR phase 2

 

21,000

60,518

69,080

69,588

34,000

254,186

Shaded cells represent current Transport Grant commitments (legacy schemes)

78

Option Three – Preferred option - 191 million

Project/scheme

Revenue Implications

Year 1 2010/11 000s

Year 2 2011/12 000s

Year 3 2012/13 000s

Year 4 2013/14 000s

Year 5 2014/15 000s

5 year total 000s

Bus corridors tranche 1 Carmarthen to Swansea Swansea Valley to City Centre Llandarcy to Swansea H’fordwest to Tenby via Pembroke

Low

3,000

4,000

6,000

2,000

0

15,000

Bus corridors tranche 2 Port Talbot to Swansea Ammanford to Cross Hands H’fordwest to Tenby via Narberth Pembroke to Milford Haven

Low

0

2,000

3,000

5,000

5,000

15,000

Bus corridors tranche 3 Port Talbot to Neath Capital enhancement schemes for community transport H’fordwest to Milford and Fishguard

Medium

0

0

1,000

1,000

3,000 To be continued to next programme

5,000

Park and Ride tranche 1 Landore P& R extension Swansea west P& R Carmarthen P& R

High

2,000

3,000

4,000

1,000

0

10,000

Park and Ride tranche 2 Park and share near M4 Llanelli P&R Tenby P & R

High

0

0

0

4,000

5,000 To be continued to next programme

9,000

Interchanges tranche 1 Quadrant Bus Station Llanelli Bus Station Milford Haven interchange Port Talbot Parkway Gowerton station

Low

2,000

5,000

4,000

4,000

0

15,000

Interchanges tranche 2 Fishguard bus focal point Pembroke Dock interchange Carmarthen bus station Carms interchanges Llanelli Railway Stn

Low

0

0

1,000

3,000

6,000

10,000

79

Neath Railway stn Tenby bus focal point

             

Interchanges tranche 3 Goodwick rail .bus interchange Clynderwen station

Low

0

0

0

0

1,000 To be continued to next programme

1,000

Sustainable tranche 1 VCN and Connect 2 phase 1 European Boulevard, Swansea Sustainable towns development N/Sroute in Pembs St Davids Ped links

Medium

1,000

1,000

2,000

2,000

1,000

7,000

Sustainable tranche 2 VCN and connect2 phase 2 Cuty Centre urban network of routes

Medium

0

0

0

1,000

2,000 To be continued to next programme

3,000

PDR phase 2 (Top sliced from WAG budget)

Low

10,000

30,518

32,080

30,588

0

103,186

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 1 Outstanding Carms commitments PDR phase 1 Road Safety package Cross Hands ELR Southern strategic route - A477 Fingerpost Jct to Energy Site Route Corridor enhancement Baglan Energy Park Link Bridge Carmarthen west

Low

3,000

16,000

14,000

0

0

33,000

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 2 Northern Distributor Network–Bulford Road Pembs Community regen project Bridge improvements Carms Waterston bypass

Low

0

4,000

15,000

14,000

3,000

36,000

Econ’c Regen Infrastructure tranche 3 North Carms Ceredigion link rd Carmarthen east link Pontardawe Cross Valley link bridge Swansea West Access Road

Low

0

0

1,000

16,000

17,000 To be continued to next programme

34,000

Totals (excluding legacy schemes)

 

11,000

35,000

49,000

53,000

43,000

191,000

Totals including PDR phase 2

 

21,000

65,518

81,080

83,588

43,000

294,186

Shaded cells represent current Transport Grant commitments (legacy schemes) 80

Table 4.4 – RTP 2 (2015/16 – 2019/20) Outline Programme

Project Scheme

5 year totals

 

000s

Bus Corridors tranche 2

8,000

Bus corridors tranche 3

14,000

Bus corridors tranche 4

18,000

Bus Corridors total

40,000

Park & Ride tranche 2

15,000

Park & Ride tranche 3

15,000

Park and Ride total

30,000

Transport Interchanges tranche 2

27,000

Transport interchanges tranche 3

18,000

Transport Interchanges total

45,000

   

Sustainable tranche 2

22,000

Sustainable tranche 3

18,000

Sustainable and Healthy Travel total

40,000

   

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure tranche 2

50,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure tranche 3

31,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure total

81,000

   

Totals

236,000

RTP 3 (2019/20 – 2024/25) Outline Programme

Project Scheme

5 year totals

 

000s

Bus Corridors tranche 4

10,000

Bus corridors tranche 5

25,000

Bus Corridors total

35,000

Park & Ride tranche 3

20,000

Park and Ride total

20,000

Transport Interchanges tranche 3

10,000

Transport interchanges tranche 4

25,000

Transport Interchanges total

35,000

   

Sustainable tranche 3

10,000

Sustainable tranche 4

15,000

Sustainable tranche 5

18,000

Sustainable and Healthy Travel total

43,000

   

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure tranche 3

12,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure tranche 4

75,000

Economic Regeneration Infrastructure total

87,000

   

Totals

220,000

. • Park and Ride (Swansea and Carmarthenshire)

. • Rural bus services (Pembrokeshire Coastal bus network and Gower Explorer)

. • Bus priority schemes (Swansea Metro)

. • Infrastructure schemes (Port Talbot PDR, Ammanford and Morfa Berwick Distributor roads, Bluestone Access)

. • Interchanges (Haverfordwest bus station)

. • Community transport (Pembrokeshire Town Rider and Neath Port Talbot Transport for Communities schemes)

. • Walking and Cycling schemes: Pont King Morgan (Carmarthen) and Safe Routes in the Communities schemes and NCN schemes across the region.

. • Partnership schemes: Pembrokeshire Greenways and Baytrans (Swansea and Neath Port Talbot)

5.0 CHAPTER FIVE - DELIVERY AND MONITORING

Introduction

1. 5.1 A programme of transport projects has been developed as set out in Chapter 4. Delivery of the programme will be achieved through partnership working and will involve the use of a wide range of skills including planning, project management, engineering and marketing.

2. 5.2 Monitoring for the RTP will be closely related to the WTS outcomes and Strategic Priorities, the emerging Wales Transport Monitoring Plan (WTMP), and the RTP objectives. The WTMP has currently not been published because it needs to take account of the National Transport Plan which will be published in draft in Summer 2009 and in final form in Autumn 2009.

Delivery

1. 5.3 Success in delivering RTP objectives and key priorities will require sustained partnership working between a range of public, private and voluntary organisations and agencies. It will involve sharing information, agreeing challenging policies and developing joint projects to improve access and transport in South West Wales.

1.5.4 Many of the stakeholders who have contributed to the RTP development will be a part of the process of delivering objectives including:

. • Internal Local Authority colleagues from Environment, Planning, Economic Development, Housing, Education, Leisure Departments etc

. • National Park Authorities

. • Health Care planners and providers

. • Transport Operators, commercial and voluntary

. • Large Employers

. • Transport User organisations

. • Various Fora with wide ranging audiences

1. 5.5 It will be particularly important that the RTP objectives and key priorities are considered as part of the ongoing development of each local authority’s Local Development Plan (and National Park Authorities where appropriate) so that the link between land use planning and transport, identified so frequently as critical by stakeholders in the RTP process, can be strengthened.

2. 5.6 The RTP 5 Year Programme consists of specific capital schemes which will be mainly implemented within local authority boundaries. The four SWWITCH authorities have

SWWITCH Programme Management

5.8 SWWITCH will take a robust approach to risk management, ensuring that risks are identified, assessed and reduced wherever possible. SWWITCH will ensure that schemes are fully prepared and alternatives considered ensuring that the all schemes provide the best value for money and that the risk of unforeseen additional costs is minimised. Scheme risks will be the responsibility of the SWWITCH Programme Management Board. However the responsibility for programme risks will lie with the SWWITCH Joint Committee.

Monitoring the RTP

5.9 SWWITCH commissioned a Monitoring Action Plan in 2003, in the context of preparing a Regional Transport Strategy. This recommended that the following Key Performance Indicators should be adopted:

. • Public transport accessibility

. • % of rural households within 13 minutes walk of hourly bus service

. • % of urban households within 400m of hourly service

. • Bus and traffic journey times

. • Bus and traffic journey time reliability

. • Bus and rail passenger satisfaction

. • Environmental impacts

. • No of cycle trips to key destinations

. • No of cycle trips on National Cycle Network

. • Road Safety

. • number of children killed or seriously injured

. • number of people killed or seriously injured

. • slight injury rate per 100 vehicle kms

1. 5.10 While SWWITCH recognises the importance of monitoring, limited progress has been made in establishing baseline data due to high cost of data collection. However, bus and rail user satisfaction surveys were carried out in 2005, a Travel Pattern Research study was commissioned in 2006 and a Congestion Mapping study was carried out in 2007 and results from all of these have formed a part of the RTP development.

2. 5.11 The preparation of the RTP requires a more holistic approach to monitoring, however the previous work undertaken by SWWITCH remains relevant.

3. 5.12 The WTS sets out a number of indicators which WAG will use to measure progress towards its outcomes. The Welsh Assembly Government is developing a Wales Transport Monitoring Strategy which will provide a framework for a joined up and integrated system of monitoring by the Welsh Assembly Government, the transport consortia and the local authorities.

4. 5.13 Those indicators based on social aspirations, relating to improved access to a range of services will be assessed based on information provided through the transport consortia using the Accession™ programme. There are resource implications to update and develop the Strategic Accessibility Assessment and it would clearly be desirable for the transport consortia and WAG to work closely on this analysis in order to achieve a consistent approach across Wales. There remains some concern that Accession™ cannot be used to demonstrate access by walking and cycling and thus does not present a complete local picture of available access.

5. 5.14 The required indicators relating to road collisions and casualties are already collected, collated and analysed by local authorities and these will be collated and submitted regionally to WAG. Clearly this information will also be relevant to regional and local monitoring of the RTP.

6. 5.15 In developing a monitoring plan for the RTP, SWWITCH will seek to ensure that what is measured, and the results of the analysis, will inform the RTP Annual Progress Reports and indicate what types of intervention work well. This will guide future investment decisions.

1.5.16 There are as yet no targets established for the WTS and SWWITCH supports the WAG view that it is important to ensure that prior to establishing realistic but challenging targets:

. • Good baseline information is established

. • Affordable mechanisms to measure the impact of investment are in place

5.17 SWWITCH is required to identify regional indicators which will:

. • Monitor progress towards achieving regional transport objectives and priorities as set out in the RTP

. • Evaluate the effectiveness of different types and combinations of interventions to enable future strategies and plans to focus on the most effective measures

1. 5.18 While SWWITCH recognises the importance of monitoring, there remain serious concerns about the availability, practicality and cost of obtaining the necessary data, both baseline and ongoing.

2. 5.19 Table 5.1 (page 87) sets out SWWITCH’s proposed proposals for monitoring, data/information sources for each of the RTP objectives

3. 5.20 From this it can be seen that considerable further work is required to assess base line trends. Several monitoring measures would need data from repeated or ongoing surveys, which are likely to have significant revenue costs. Public transport patronage data is an obvious indicator. However, in the past operators have not been prepared to release data for reasons of commercial confidentiality. This is in marked contrast to the situation in England where bus patronage is a Best Value Indicator and an integral part of the shared priorities between national and local governments.

5.21 Targets have not been developed at this stage, because it would be premature to do so without establishing baseline trends.

Table 5.1 – Core Regional Indicators

RTP Objective

Indicator

Data Source

Baseline

Target

Timescale

1. To improve access for all to a wide range of services and facilities including employment and business, education and training, healthcare, tourism and leisure facilities.

• Accessibility: maps/stats o Car access o public transport access • Key Connectivity analysis

• Accessibility planning software (Accession), PTI Cymru database

RTP appendix J and K

• Improve accessibility • Improve connectivity to Key Settlements and Strategic Employment sites

2010 APR will establish trends

2. To improve the sustainability of transport by improving the range and quality of, and awareness about, transport options, including those which improve health and well being.

• Public awareness of transport options • Public perception of quality of transport options • Patronage of bus & train services

• Surveys • Surveys • Operators

Some baseline survey data (2005)

To improve all these factors

2010 APR will establish trends

 

• Public satisfaction with bus and rail services

• Surveys, operator market research

     
 

• Cycle usage

data • Cycle counters

     
   

     

3. To improve the efficiency and reliability of the movement of people and freight within and beyond south west Wales to support the regional economy.

• Journey time reliability - buses - cars - HGVs

• ITIS data

To be established

To improve efficiency and reliability

2010 APR will establish trends

4. To improve integration between policies, service provision and modes of transport in south west Wales.

• Passenger satisfaction about bus rail integration

• surveys

To be established

To improve integration

2010 APR will report progress on establishing baseline

5. To implement measures which make a positive contribution to improving air quality and reducing the adverse impact of transport on health and Climate Change.

• Number of AQMAs • air pollution index

• Local authority air quality monitoring

• Established LA monitoring

To meet requirements of the Air Quality (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2002

2010 APR will establish trends

87

6. To implement measures which help to reduce the negative impact of transport across the region on the natural and built environment, including biodiversity.

• Proportion of transport schemes having an adverse impact on national and built environment

Environmental Impact Assessments

To be established

To minimise impact

2010 APR will report progress on establishing baseline

7. To improve road safety and personal security in south west Wales.

• Road casualty stats • KSIs • Child KSIs • Slight injuries per 100m vehicle kms • Public perception of personal safety related to transport use

Local authority data

Established LA monitoring

To reduce casualities • Surveys

2010 APR will establish trends. Targets to be developed in the light current consultation on new Road Safety Strategy

88

6.0 CHAPTER SIX – WELSH TRANSPORT PLANNING AND APPRAISAL GUIDANCE (WELTAG)

1. 6.1 The Welsh Transport Planning and Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG) is designed to ensure that the Regional Transport Plan (RTP) is developed objectively and that every stage of the RTP links back to what SWWITCH is trying to achieve (the plan objectives and key priorities). It is intended to be an ongoing and participative process which shapes the RTP as it evolves, rather than a freestanding and one off appraisal.

2. 6.2 WelTAG Guidance12 states:

. the Welsh Assembly Government need to be planned and appraised to ensure that the resultant schemes are “fit for purpose” and achieve the expected and required outcomes

1. 6.3 The WelTAG guidance is comprehensive and is based on sound principles which SWWITCH has always applied. The engagement process and evidence based approach required by WelTAG has helped to make transparent the development and appraisal of the RTP strategy and programme.

2. 6.4 The intention is that WelTAG will enable a level playing field for the appraisal of all modes and across diverse areas as set out in the guidance:

The core purpose of WelTAG is to enable the appraisal of all types of transport proposals in a consistent manner across Wales, regardless of size, mode(s) or the nature of the location

12 Welsh Assembly Government (June 2008) Welsh Transport Planning and Appraisal Guidance

6.5 WelTAG was developed to assist consortia (and other projects sponsors) and is intended to provide guidance rather than to inhibit action. SWWITCH has taken on broad advice from WAG officials and thus far applied WelTAG in the following context:

. • Level of effort required - in keeping with costs, risks and appraisal stage. SWWITCH has adopted a pragmatic approach at each stage of the RTP development, assessing the benefits and risks associated with the time and cost implications of different levels of appraisal. At Strategy level where there are broad objectives, level of appraisal is broad - this is particularly relevant for South West Wales where the region is very diverse, with similar access problems, but very different transport problems and potential solutions

. • At Strategy level WelTAG as an integral part of existing work – SWWITCH believes that the appraisal process cannot be separated from the development of the RTP at the strategic planning level. As will be evident from preceding chapters the draft RTP has been subject to stakeholder engagement and scrutiny at each stage of the process. That has taken time and effort from all those involved, but has been invaluable as part of shaping the RTP strategy. To have separated the processes would be wasteful, confusing to stakeholders and ultimately could alienate key partners who are critical to helping to deliver the plan.

. • No separate Transport Planning Objectives have been developed - this was considered to be unnecessary with the RTP objectives having been developed consultatively and providing a proper framework to evaluate the options and strategy development

. • Participants in consultation should not be constrained by the application of WelTAG - this was seen by SWWITCH as critical. The RTP guidance and that for the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) are quite clear about the importance of involving stakeholders in developing and evaluating potential options. There are considered to be potential conflicts between the RTP and SEA guidance and the WelTAG guidance and SWWITCH decided that participants would not benefit from being constrained in making choices. They were therefore encouraged to consider all options at each stage (within the context of the RTP objectives once adopted)

. • No external costs should accrue for Strategy (Stage 1) WelTAG - This has been critical in the context of the SWWITCH budget position over the last two financial years and has resulted in a degree of familiarity with WelTAG application in SWWITCH.

6.6 The Stage 1 Strategy WelTAG was carried out prior to the draft RTP being published and Stage 1 project appraisal is now complete. However, to date there has been no Stage 2 appraisal of the projects in the RTP programme due to time and funding constraints. The one exception to this is those bus corridors included in tranche 1 of the RTP programme, which have been developed and appraised to Stage 2 as part of an evolving Convergence fund bid.

6.7 SWWITCH will carry out the Stage 2 WelTAG project appraisals in the coming year to allow prioritisation of the RTP programme to be completed and to ensure that as soon as RTP funding is allocated, progress on delivering projects can commence.

Stage One Strategy Appraisal

1. 6.8 The first step in the Stage One process was to set planning objectives. This was carried out after the analysis of problems and opportunities described in Chapter One (paragraphs 1.41 – 1.45) and resulted in the RTP objectives (paragraph 1.50). WelTAG then requires that the objectives are appraised against the problems and opportunities. This is shown in Table 6.1 (page 93).

06.9 The RTP objectives must also be tested against the Wales Transport Strategy (WTS) outcomes (in terms of the pillars of sustainability) and Strategic Priorities. This was carried out as a part of the ongoing RTP development and is shown in Tables 1.3 and

11.4 in Chapter One.

2. 6.10 The next stage of the RTP development was to identify possible options or mechanisms by which the RTP objectives could be achieved. The participative process which SWWITCH adopted for this stage is described briefly in Chapter Two and more fully in Appendix F. The outcome of the process was that no single option or mechanism could deliver the RTP objectives in South West Wales and that a “Mix and Match” approach would be needed.

3. 6.11 The development of the long term strategy for the RTP is also described in Chapter Two and Appendix F and appraised against WTS outcomes and Strategic Priorities in Tables 2.1 and 2.2. Table 6.2 (page 94) appraises the long term strategy for the RTP against the RTP objectives.

4. 6.12 SWWITCH is confident that WelTAG has been applied appropriately and thoroughly to the RTP strategy development process. The appraisal has been embedded into the ongoing RTP work and so has helped to shape and influence the engagement process, without constraining stakeholders who have been encouraged to articulate views and debate for and against a wide range of opinions and aspirations.

Stage One Project Appraisal

1. 6.13 More than three hundred project ideas were generated through the programme consultation and the summary of the filtering of projects is detailed in Appendix F. The mechanism adopted for appraising projects against the RTP objectives and subsequently in line with the SWWITCH prioritisation process is outlined in Chapter 4.

2. 6.14 The detail of the appraisal and prioritisation process, which has resulted in a list of seventy five RTP projects, is set out in Appendix S. The proformas used are shown on

6.15 Rather than adopt specific Transport Planning Objectives for each project as part of WelTAG, SWWITCH has used the overall RTP objectives (see page 25) as the baseline and then summarised the applicable objectives that the projects addresses in each AST.

Stage 2 Project appraisal

6.16 Stage 2 appraisal is not completed for a number of reasons:

. • The time taken to properly appraise RTP projects at Stage 2 level to ensure a cohesive RTP programme was developed

. • Determining what level of appraisal each project or package of projects should be subject to

. • The costs of detailed investigations for those projects or packages where very detailed examination is required in the context of budgetary constraints over the last two years.

1. 6.17 It is intended that during the next six to nine months that in discussions with the Assembly, agreement will be reached on appropriate levels of stage 2 appraisal ( or possibly extended stage 1 appraisal) and that funding will be allocated to allow external support to be secured to assist in the process. The detailed examination is essential to allow the projects to be more fully investigated and tested against required outcomes and also to allow more detailed prioritisation to take place.

2. 6.18 The outcomes of the stage 2 appraisal and an explanation of how that has shaped priorities and the SWWITCH RTP forward programme will form part of the first Annual Progress Report of the RTP in 2010.

Table 6.1- Appraising the RTP objectives against key problems identified by stakeholders

Commonly Raised Access Problems RTP Objectives

Poor access to health services and facilities

Poor Access to employment opportunities

Poor integration at policy and service delivery levels

Need for step change in quality and frequency of public transport options

Poor Quality Interchanges

Need more and better sustainable transport options

1. To improve access for all to a wide range of services and facilities including employment and business, education and training, healthcare, tourism and leisure facilities.

√√

√√√

√√

√√

√√

√√√

2. To improve the sustainability of transport by improving the range and quality of, and awareness about, transport options, including those which improve health and well being.

√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√√

3. To improve the efficiency and reliability of the movement of people and freight within and beyond south west Wales to support the regional economy.

√√

√√

√√

√√

4. To improve integration between policies, service provision and modes of transport in south west Wales.

√√

√√

√√√

√√

√√√

√√

5. To implement measures which make a positive contribution to improving air quality and reducing the adverse impact of transport on health and Climate Change.

√√

√√

√√√

6. To implement measures which help to reduce the negative impact of transport across the region on the natural and built environment, including biodiversity.

√√

√√

√√√

7. To improve road safety and personal security in south west Wales.

√√

√√√

Where = minor fit, √√ = moderate fit, √√√= major fit

Table 6.2 – RTP Long Term Strategy appraisal match with the RTP Objectives

RTP Objectives(see Table Ten for detail)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Long Term Strategy

Improving land use and transportation planning

√√√

√√√

√√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√√

√√

Improving strategic east/west road and rail links

√√√

√√√

√√

Improving Strategic Bus Corridors

√√

√√

√√

√√√

√√

√√

√√

Promoting integration

√√√

√√√

√√√

√√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√

√√

Improving safety in transport

√√

√√

√√

√√

√√

√√

√√

√√√

Providing more and better information

√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√

Improving linkages between key settlements and strategic employment sites

√√√

√√

√√√

√√√

√√

√√

√√

Improving the efficiency of the highway network

√√√

√√

√√

√√

√√√

√√

Where = minor fit, √√ = moderate fit, √√√= major fit

94

Table 6.3 - Appraisal Proformas Proforma used to Appraise all 120 projects against RTP Objectives

RTP Objectives

RTP Objective 1

RTP Objective 2

RTP Objective 3

RTP Objective 4

RTP Objective 5

RTP Objective 6

RTP Objective 7

Projects

               
               
               
               
               

Proforma used to Assess all projects in pool against RTP threshold

                 
     

Fit with RTP Objectives

Value for

 

Regional

   
           
     

Environmental

Social

Economic

Money

Delivery

Impact

Total

 
 

Weighting

 

1

1

1

3

3

2

   
 

Projects

 

Ob 5

Ob 6

Ob 2

Ob 7

Ob 1

Ob 3

Ob 4

         

1

                           

2

                           

3

                           

4

                           

95

7.0 CHAPTER SEVEN - STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROGRESS

Chapter Seven provides a brief summary of the complex procedures and assessments undertaken as part of the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Appropriate Assessment Screening (Habitats Regulations of 1994). It clarifies:

. • The status and purpose of the processes and the stages involved

. • Stakeholder engagement and key issues raised

Background and context

1. 7.1 SEA is a legal requirement for certain plans and programmes in Wales under the Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes (Wales) Regulations 2004 (Statutory Instrument No. 1656) which entered into force in July 2004. SWWITCH is undertaking a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the emerging South West Wales RTP.

2. 7.2 The purpose of the SEA is to integrate environmental concerns into the RTP throughout its development, from the inception stage through to plan adoption. It is a policy-aiding rather than a policy-making tool, and is a systematic process that assists with identifying and assessing the significant environmental effects of a plan or programme. The SEA guidance describes SEA in terms of five main stages as shown in Table 7.1 below:

Table 7.1 - Stages of Strategic Environmental Assessment

Stage A:

Setting the context and objectives, establishing the baseline and deciding on the scope. The consultation bodies Countryside Council for Wales, the Environment

 

Agency and Cadw must be consulted.

Stage B:

Developing and refining alternatives and assessing effects.

Stage C:

Preparing and production of an Environmental Report (ER) identifying the likely significant environmental effects of the draft plan or programme. The Environmental Report provides information to the RTP process on the environmental effects of alternative strategies.

Stage D:

Consulting the consultation bodies, other stakeholders and the public on the draft plan or programme and the Environmental Report. Providing information when the

 

plan or programme is adopted and showing how the results of the SEA and

 

consultation have been taken into account (the SEA Post Adoption Statement).

Stage E:

The SEA Regulations for Wales also require the significant environmental effects of

 

plan or programme implementation to be monitored, and for appropriate remedial

 

action to be considered in order to reduce or offset adverse environmental effects.

7.3 Appropriate Assessment is required where any plan, alone or ‘in combination’ with other plans, could have an adverse affect on the integrity of wetlands of international importance (designated as Ramsar sites) as well as those sites which are protected under Natura 2000 designation.

7.4 Natura 2000 is a European network of protected sites which represent areas of the highest value for natural habitats and species of plants and animals which are rare, endangered or vulnerable in the European Community. The Natura 2000 network includes two types of area; areas may be designated as

’Any plan or project not directly connected with or necessary to the management of the site but likely to have a significant effect thereon, either individually or in combination with other plans or projects, shall be subject to appropriate assessment of its implications for the site in view of the site's conservation objectives’. Article 6(3) of the European Habitats Directive 13

7.5 The basic stages of this assessment process are contained in Table 7.2

Task AA1

Screening – identifying likely significant effects

Task AA2

Appropriate Assessment and ascertaining the effect on site integrity

Task AA3

Mitigation measures and alternative solutions

Strategic Environmental Assessment

7.6 Work on the SEA for the South West Wales RTP commenced in October 2006 alongside the early stages of the development of the RTP. Following the workshop an SEA scoping report was prepared. The scoping report sought to:

. • Describe the SEA process

. • Establish the scope of environmental topics to be included in the South West Wales RTP SEA

. • Establish the spatial and temporal scope of environmental assessment

. • Provide a review of relevant policies, plans and programmes (at international national, regional and local levels)

. • Describe the environmental baseline and current environmental trends

. • Propose a set of SEA objectives against which the RTP could be assessed

. • Propose an approach to undertaking the main strategic environmental assessment for the RTP

7.7 Throughout the scoping report there were a series of consultation questions. The report was sent for consultation to the statutory consultees (Countryside Council for Wales, Environment Agency Wales and Cadw) and other non-statutory consultees including Sustrans, Neath Port Talbot CBC, City and County of Swansea Council, Pembrokeshire County Council, Carmarthenshire County Council, Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority, Brecon Beacons National Park Authority and the RSPB.

1. 7.8 SWWITCH worked with appointed Consultants on the preparation of the Environmental Report. Following the RTP consultation period, the Environmental Report was updated to take account of any resultant changes to the RTP. A copy of which accompanies the publication of the RTP in the form of an SEA Post Adoption Statement.

2. 7.9 Each RTP option in the programme pool has been assessed one at a time against all of the SEA objectives, allowing for a transparent environmental overview of each option. This approach had the further advantage of allowing the assessors to more easily review or amend the assessment should further detail on the RTP option become available at a later stage.

. • Temporal scale of effects (short, medium or long term; permanent or temporary)

. • Reversibility of effects

. • Magnitude and spatial extent of effects

. • Value and vulnerability of the area likely to be affected

7.10 An option would be assessed as having a major adverse effect where it would substantially exacerbate existing problems or create new problems. These are represented by a major adverse effect rating and red colour coding in the assessment tables. Significant positive effects are defined as those effects which would resolve an existing issue or maximise opportunities, represented by a major positive rating and green colour coding in the assessment tables.

Screening for Appropriate Assessment

7.11 Appropriate assessment tests whether a plan or a project is likely to have a significant negative impact on any of the following:

. • Special Protection Area (SPA) – a European Natura 2000 designation which protects birds

. • Special Area of Conservation (SAC) – a European Natura 2000 designation which protects habitats

. • Ramsar site – a European designation which protects wetlands.

1. 7.12 Appropriate assessment will only affect a project or plan if the project/plan will have a significant impact on the ‘site integrity’ of a European site: the reason why the site was designated. A methodical screening process was carried out for schemes considered within the project pool of the RTP with potential stand alone, in combination, cumulative and synergistic effects considered in relation to existing protected sites. The screening process followed that set out in Table 7.4 on page 100.

2. 7.13 The results of the initial study were subject to a consultation process involving the statutory consultees, the feedback from which was reflected in the final assessment contained in the AA report.

Table 7.4 - Appropriate Assessment Screening Methodology for SW Wales RTP

Step

Description

AA1

List any Natura 2000 sites within, adjacent to or associated with the area that the plan covers. Review the site(s)’ qualifying interest features, conservation objectives and Favourable Condition Tables. Analyse any underlying trends.

AA2

Determine whether the plan is directly connected with or necessary to the management of the Natura 2000 site. If it is, then no further assessment is necessary.

AA3

Identify and discount all policies and proposals that will have no significant impact on the Natura 2000 site(s) (including direct indirect and secondary impacts).

AA4

Identify any ‘in combination’ effects of the plan with other plans and projects (including direct indirect and secondary impacts) i.e. the cumulative effect of influences of all the plans and projects on the site(s)’ conditions required to maintain integrity.

AA5

Identify policies and proposals that may have a significant impact (including direct indirect and secondary impacts) to take through to the appropriate assessment phase if appropriate assessment is considered necessary (Task AA2).

 

REGIONAL TRANSPORT PLAN - GLOSSARY OF TERMS

AA

Appropriate Assessment

AONB

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

APR’s

Annual Progress Reports

AQMA

Air Quality Management Area

AST’s

Appraisal Summary Table

BSOG

Bus Service Operators’ Grant

CCW

Countryside Council for Wales

CPE

Civil Parking Enforcement

ER

Environment Report

EU

European Union

FQP

Freight Quality Partnership

HOWL

Heart of Wales LIne

HGVs

Heavy Goods Vehicles

KSI

Killed or Seriously Injured

LDPs

Local Development Plans

LNG

Liquid Natural Gas

LPG

Liquid Petroleum Gas

NMD

Network Management Duty

NTP

National Transport Plan

PIPs

Punctuality Improvement Partnerships

QBCs

Quality Bus Contracts

QBPs

Quality Bus Partnerships

RoRo

Roll on Roll off ferries

RSPB

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

RTP

Regional Transport Plan

SACs

Special Areas of Conservation

SEA

Strategic Environmental Assessment

Sewta

South East Wales Transport Alliance

SLAA

Strategic Level Accessibility Assessment

SPAs

Special Protection Areas

SPG

Specific Planning Guidance

SSSI

Sites of Special Scientific Interest

SWTRA

South Wales Trunk Road Agency

SWWITCH

South West Wales Integrated Transport Consortium

TENS

Trans European Networks

TEN-T

Trans European Network for Transport

TraCC

Mid Wales Transport consortium

UDPs

Unitary Development Plans

VMS

Variable Message Signing

WAG

Welsh Assembly Government

WelTAG

Welsh Transport Planning and Appraisal Guidance

WFS

Wales Freight Strategy

WLGA

Welsh Local Government Association

WSP

Wales Spatial Plan

WTMP

Wales Transport Monitoring Plan

WTS

Wales Transport Strategy