SECTION

Page

1.0 CHAIR’S FOREWORD

3

2.0 BACKGROUND

4

3.0 TERMS OF REFERENCE

4

4.0 SCOPE

5

5.0 APPROACH

5

6.0 KEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

7

6.1THE INCLUSION AND INTEGRATED DISABILITY SERVICE

7

6.2 CURRENT PERFORMANCE

11

6.3 RESOURCES FOR ADDITIONAL LEARNING NEEDS INCLUDING:

      6.3.2 SERVICE LEVEL RESOURCES

      6.3.3 SCHOOL LEVEL RESOURCING OF SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

      6.3.4 STATEMENTING OR STATUTORY ASSESSMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

12

13

14

15

6.4. SPECIALIST PROVISION IN THE COUNTY

16

6.5 TRANSITION PHASE

23

6.6 PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

25

6.7 ACCESS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES TO EDUCATION

27

6.8 CONSULTATION RESULTS

28

7.0 CONCLUSION

30

APPENDIX 1: MULTI-AGENCY ACTION PLAN OF SERVICES FOR DISABLED CHILDREN AND CHILDREN WITH COMPLEX NEEDS

32

APPENDIX 2: LIST OF SPECIALIST PROVISION WITHIN THE COUNTY

33

APPENDIX 3: A CARER’S ACCOUNT

41

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

43

6.1.1 An Inclusion Strategy for Lifelong Learning in the county has been developed by a multi-agency group, with a core aim of contributing to building an inclusive community. It is intended to form the foundation for planning inclusive services over the long term to achieve maximum effectiveness. The Group recognises that promoting inclusion in Carmarthenshire will have an impact on every aspect of the system of Inclusion mapped below:

6.1.4 This integration of services was pivotal in order to provide a coherent and consistent joined-up service for pupils, parents and schools and so to improve provision. The Service is at a very formative stage of development. Its key aims are to:

6.1.5 The Wales Assembly Government (WAG) intends making changes to statutory education assessment which are expected to be in place by 2012. In anticipation of these changes, the Service is seeking to develop a more integrated approach to assessment, planning, intervention and review in order to:

6.1.6 The Authority has already some experience of integrated team working through the long established Family Support Team within the social care provision. This team, which works with children with disabilities, was set up to meet the needs of children with a learning disability. Over the years the team has increased its involvement with children with learning and physical disabilities as well as children with complex health needs. In 2006/7 new eligibility criteria were agreed that reflected its wider remit. The learning from this team has contributed to the wider thinking about integration.

6.1.7 In the wider sphere of inclusion and where multi-professional advice, support and intervention are appropriate, the Service aims to achieve this in a consistent and coherent manner. It is therefore devolving services close to families of schools in the Team around Pupils, Parents and Schools (TaPPaS). This will ensure that families of schools are engaged with the same group of professionals, that information sharing is made much easier and joint practice more efficient. The Group recognises that the achievement of this change requires a great deal of development as it remains an innovative approach within Wales.

6.1.8 Where children and their families become the focus of our targeted services the Service aims to develop a shared approach to providing support, advice, guidance and intervention by developing the Team around the Child (TaC). The TaC will be the minimum number of professionals, from different disciplines and agencies needed to make a difference to the child and family. This approach requires all practitioners to think holistically about the needs of the child within the context of the family and the school. This will often necessitate professional sharing of information, developing a shared understanding of need and agreeing joint interventions to be delivered concurrently.

6.1.9 In taking this innovative approach to working with children, families and schools the Service will explore two key concepts over the next eighteen months:

6.1.10 Recommendation:

6.1.11 A Partnership Approach: The Group recognises the importance of working in partnership within this service area. The aim of the overarching Education and Children’s Service is to work with health services and the voluntary sector to provide coherent services for children and their families. This is evidenced within the Children’s and Young People Plan 2008-2011 which is currently in the process of being finalised. The approach to the provision of services is also to partner with parents; to consult and gather their views, as well as the views of their children, in order to tailor services to meet parents’ and their children’s needs wherever possible. A key element in this approach is to offer parental choice. Parental choice is where parents are given the opportunity to consider a number of ways in which their child’s needs could be met and so make an informed choice within the resources available. This will include making the option of access to mainstream education available to parents of children with even the most complex needs. Wherever reasonable the Service will endeavour to support them in making such choices a reality.

6.1.12 The development of parental choice will mean that many more children and young people will have their needs met in mainstream schools, wherever possible, or in a nearby specialist teaching and learning centre as part of a mainstream school closer to home.

6.2 Current Performance

6.2.1 The Group found that Carmarthenshire is doing reasonably well in terms of meeting special educational needs, as evidenced by the benchmarking data 2006/07. It is the:

6.2.5 A multi-agency review of Services for Disabled Children and Children with Complex Health Needs was conducted during 2006/07. This involved Carmarthenshire County Council, Local Health Board and Trust and considered how many children were included in this client Group, what services were being provided, client views of the current provision as well the cost of the services. An action plan was developed and progress against the key actions is noted in Appendix 1.

6.3 Resources for Additional Learning Needs

6.3.2 Service Level Resources: The Group found that the demand upon the service continues to rise due to:

6.3.4.1 Statements can be asked for by either the parents of the child, an involved agency or the school itself. Some children will be assessed before entering school, some after entry to school or if it becomes apparent that a child’s needs are not met by existing in-school support.

6.3.4.2 A statement will specify the nature of the support the Local Education Authority (LEA) needs to provide to an individual child with substantial and ongoing Special Educational Needs. The LEA needs to consult the parents and the child as well as the school and a number of agencies, such as health services. An LEA Statementing Panel (including representative Head teachers, an Educational psychologist and other advisers as necessary) will then consider all the findings and decide whether or not a statement is appropriate. Its decision can be challenged by parents who can take to the matter to either the Parent Partnership service, the Disagreement Service or the Tribunal for Special Educational Needs to help resolve any difference of opinion. Where statements of Special Educational Needs are made these should be reviewed on an annual basis.

6.3.4.3 It currently costs between 3,500 and 4,000 to produce a statement, which could be greater than the level of support package required. As well as being costly, the statutory assessment process is bureaucratic and can be extremely stressful for parents. An Audit Commission study in 20025 found that, whilst many parents valued the formal recognition of the needs of their children and knowing what support would be provided throughout their education, it often added too little value and could be unresponsive to changing needs. The pressure and focus has been one of securing a level of funding to support a child instead of examining what needs to done to secure his or her progress. There was also found to be a lack of monitoring by LEAs and schools as to the effectiveness of their approach to meeting pupils’ needs.

6.3.4.4 The Group recognises that statements do provide the means to target resources to children requiring very high levels of support but the current bureaucratic approach consumes resources in terms of professional skills and expertise that might be better used in focusing on meeting the needs of children and young people with Special Educational Needs and disabilities.

6.3.4.5 Carmarthenshire is currently the 3rd highest provider of statements in Wales as well as the 4th highest issuer of new statements. The Service is currently aiming gradually to reduce over reliance on statementing by the use of 2% eligibility criteria that is in line with statutory expectations, whilst at the same time enhancing the level of delegated funding at school Action Plus. The Group wishes to emphasise that this will not involve taking children or young people off existing statements and those children who meet the eligibility criteria will obtain a statement.

6.3.4.6 The WAG has been conducting a review of Special Educational Needs funding and provision, however the outcomes of this review have not yet been published. A pre-consultation was undertaken in relation to this however the delay in publishing the results has increased the frustration felt by parents who are wary of any changes being made.

6.4 Specialist Provision within the County

6.4.2.1 The Authority has obtained substantial funding from the WAG of 720,000 to develop a new regional Hub for children and young people with SEN at the Queen Elizabeth High School in Carmarthen. The Group visited the site which is due to open in September 2008. Although the development was not complete at the time of the visit, the Group was impressed by the range of facilities which will be available for children and young people with a large range of needs.

6.4.2.2 The facilities, which will include life-skills flat, sensory rooms, quiet rooms and a relaxation pool, are being built for purpose and should have capacity for up to 56 pupils. There will also be space for health services (nurses and therapists) on site.

6.4.2.3 A panel, including relevant Head teacher representation, has been involved in the planning of the new hub and it has also consulted with parents and staff from the local specialist units about the new development through a series of meetings. Further meetings are planned to take place during the course of the development and parents and staff will also be invited to see the hub when it is completed.

6.4.2.4 The Group was impressed by the potential of the new development, although it was concerned that places available for residents in the county might be limited by the “new school” effect with parents of children with complex needs moving into the area to access these resources. It felt that the hub, when completed, could provide a benchmark for future provision and therefore an evaluation of the development should be completed for future reference.

6.4.3 Ysgol y Gwendraeth, Garreglwyd Austistic Unit

6.4.3.2 Staff expressed serious concern, however, about the time taken to diagnose autism which can take up to 18 months. Concerns were also expressed about replacing the lead paediatrician who is due to leave.

6.4.3.3 Recommendation:

6.4.5.2 The Group was impressed by the successful inclusion initiatives linking with the mainstream school. Peer group classes in the main school visit the Unit regularly and are taught signing skills (reverse inclusion). Signing is used at school concerts etc and pupils from the Unit took part in the recent Christmas concert. Individual timetables are developed for each child and the TAs maintain individual Inclusion diaries recording any mainstream activity. There is one to one support for any children attending mainstream classes.

6.4.5.4 The Group noted that the Unit is located in a modern mobile classroom however the acoustic environment could be further improved. The prohibitive cost of soundproofing a classroom adjacent to the main School Hall had prevented it from being located in the main school. Hard floors in the main school were also not ideal for classes attended by children from the Unit. The Group was however impressed by the use of surround sound systems in some of the classes which had been bought through grant funding. The school would like to buy a further four such systems, which cost approximately 1,000 each, and will bid for these as grant funding becomes available.

6.4.5.5 Recommendation:

6.4.5.8 Recommendation:

6.4.8.4 Recommendation:

6.4.9 Modernising Education Programme (MEP)

6.4.9.1 The Group was feels strongly that special schools and specialist units should be included in the Modernising Education Programme (MEP), so that the strategic needs of existing provision can be met in the longer term, along with those of the primary and secondary schools in the county. A review of the condition of school buildings is expected to be undertaken in the coming year and the Group feels that this should include the special schools and units, alongside the accessibility issues in mainstream schools. The Group recognises that there is no capital funding allocated within MEP to invest in special schools and specialist units, and without additional funding being allocated it will not be possible to progress.

6.4.9.2 Recommendation:

6.4.10 The Group felt that the site visits had been immensely beneficial as it had been able to experience the excellent care and support given to the children and young people it had seen. It witnessed the dedication of staff at all units and their commitment to providing the best possible care for the children and young people who attend. It also provided an opportunity to assess elements of the current provision and identify necessary improvements. The Group felt that an induction and development programme for key aspects of Education and Children’s Services, including relevant visits, would be of great benefit for future members of the main Scrutiny Committee and all members, in their role as corporate parents.

6.4.11 Recommendation:

“Young people who require continuing services, such as those who are disabled or chronically ill, young people with persistent mental illness or disorders, vulnerable young people and their families and carers, and care leavers, are offered a range of co-ordinated multi-agency services, according to assessed need, in order to make effective transitions from childhood to adulthood.”

6.5.2 The standard sets out 6 key actions for local authorities, health services and Children and Young people Framework Partnerships. One of these is the appointment of a key transition worker at age 14 to co-ordinate the planning and delivery of services for a young person up to 25 years of age. The Group was informed that, at 18 years of age when the young person has adult status, there may be a number of changes in respect of assessment processes; eligibility criteria; funding; consent; charging policies for services and service provision.

6.5.3 Transition is defined as a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational and vocational needs of young people with chronic disabilities as they move from child-centred to adult-orientated services. It should be a holistic process of becoming an adult, which involves health, education, social and other relevant services.

6.5.4 Transitions occur throughout the lives of all young people as they progress from childhood through puberty and adolescence to adulthood, from immaturity to maturity and from dependence to independence. Young people with disabilities experience additional transitions in their lives.

6.5.5 Currently Adult and Children’s Services jointly fund two transition social workers based within the Family Support Team. They currently become involved with a young person at the age of 16 and usually continue until the young person becomes 18 years old. Adult Services also has a transition service that assists service users to make the transition from residential to community based care.

6.6.1 Re-profiling of Services to meet Anticipated Patterns of Demand

6.6.1.1 As discussed in para 6.3.2 there is increasing demands on the services. The Group recognises that, by providing appropriate services in the locality, it is ensured that children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities:

6.6.1.2 Whilst the aim is to meet the needs of a child/ young person in a mainstream local school or linked specialist unit, it is recognised that this is not always possible and the Service has developed the concept of the regional hub, in Queen Elizabeth High School (discussed in para 6.4.2), which is resourced at a high level to meet a wide range of special educational and disability need. This will reduce the need for costly out of county placements for children or young people with severe and complex needs.

6.6.1.3 The Group also recognises that a very small number of children have needs that are best met within the context of a special school. The Service aims to maintain, sustain and further develop the role of the special school within the Authority. This has begun with a Welsh Assembly Government funded project where a team, the Unlocking Potential Team, is based in the special school so that it can acquire ‘special school expertise’ but also works outwards into the mainstream providing support, advice and guidance to those working with children and young people with severe and complex needs.

6.6.1.4 Wherever possible the Service will seek local, inclusive solutions to meeting needs both in and out of schools. It is vital to invest to save by developing our local provision, e.g. in the specialist provision for autistic young people in Ysgol y Gwendraeth and in our respite care homes in Blaenau and Llys Caradog. This Authority aims to support children’s and their families’ needs in order to sustain their place in the community.

6.6.1.5 On exceptional occasions this has not proved possible and the Complex Needs Panel (made up of Health, Social Care and Education Mangers) has agreed a joint placement out of county. Such placements can cost up to 200,000 per year and across the educational career of one child could amount to 2 million. Often such placements are at a considerable distance, place great burdens upon families in terms of maintaining contact with their child, cause a challenge to services in terms of protecting the child and ensuring she/he is ‘safe’ and in reality provide a level of expertise and skill that with some investment we could more than match within Carmarthenshire. The Group was informed that the Service aims to assess the total costs of such placements and examine whether by investing to save locally we can provide as good, if not a better, level of service in a new centre in the locality. This has already been put into practice and formed the business case for developing the Autism Unit at Garreglwyd, Ysgol y Gwendraeth.

6.6.1.6 Recommendation:

6.6.2 Early Screening, Diagnosis and Assessment

6.6.2.1 The Group recognises that the Service has excellent and improving links with colleagues in health. This was demonstrated in health representatives input into the review. Professionals from the service participate in the Child Development Team7 meetings to ensure that children and young people with significant learning and disability needs have an appropriate level of service from the earliest moment possible. In the first instance this is often provided by the Family Support Team8 who provide a multi-professional service to children with a disability and their families.

6.6.2.2 The Service has also developed a process known as Entry to Education (E to E), where health and other early years professionals can seek action to ensure a child with significant needs (but below those addressed by the Child Development Team) can be bridged into school effectively.

6.7.9 Recommendation:

Multi-agency Action Plan of Services for Disabled Children and Children with Complex Needs

Action area

Progress / Development

Develop a single point of access

A Disability Manager is now in post with responsibility for the sensory impairment service.

A full mapping process has been developed as part of the Integration of Children’s Services, bringing referral pathways together.

There have been multi-agency developments around ‘Team Around the Child’ model.

There is a projected co- location at St David’s Park, Carmarthen in 2009.

Additional Activities and Out of school

In summer 2007 two additional specialist clubs were piloted at Llanelli and Carmarthen - 44 children with complex needs attended.

Additional support was funded for inclusion of children into mainstream activities- 142 children funded

Funding has been provided for After School pilots at Ammanford, Carmarthen and Llanelli for 2008.

A bespoke Group has been set up for those with Aspergers Syndrome for Duke of Edinburgh 2007/2008 - 12 children attend.

Funding has been gained for British Sign Language training for more inclusion of hearing impaired and profoundly deaf children for 2008.

Short breaks funding supported a range of voluntary services in expanding their holiday provision for disabled children.

Coherent preschool assessment and intervention

Mapping has been completed and Entry to Education has been re-organised ensuring multi-agency referral processes.

Expansion of the Pre-School Intervention Service.

Sustainable multi-agency care in the home

A range of models have been explored. Care in the home is commissioned via Swansea Trust.

A range of commissioning options is currently being considered with the LHB.

Expanded provision to Crossroads Care in the home via short breaks funding.

Reduce need for residential provision

A range of specialist carer and enhancement payment schemes has been explored.

Adverts for additional carers have gone out.

Links have been made with 2 IFA’s to recruit specifically for Disabled children.

Develop agreed interagency protocols

Protocols have been established and circulated for consultation end of 2007. These are currently being re-circulated for final approval by the end of March 2008.

Name of Provision

Type

Headteacher

Nature of Provision

Capacity

Gender

Res/Day

Contact Tel & Email

Ammanford Junior

RC

Mrs M Davies

ASD

6

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Autistic Unit caters for 6 pupils form 3+ to 11 years of age on the Autistic Spectrum continuum.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Myrddin CP

RC

Mr Julian Parker

ASD

6

Mixed

Day

01267 232626

Staff.myrddin@ysgolccc.org.uk

Myrddin Autistic Unit caters for 6 pupils from 3+ to 11 years of age on the Autistic Spectrum continuum.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Pwll CP

RC

Mrs Davies (Acting Head)

Autistic Sp. ASD

6

Mixed

Day

01554 759 465

Admin.pwll@ysgolccc.org.uk

Pwll Autistic Unit caters for 6 pupils from 3+ to 11 years of age on the Autistic Spectrum continuum.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ysgol Rhydygors

SS

Mr C Saunders

ESBD

50

Mixed

Res

01267 231171

Staff1bss@rhydygors@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol Rhydygors is a weekly residential Special school for 50 pupils with significant social, emotional and behavioural difficulties form 7+ to 16 years of age. Boys and girls attend the school.

Admission to Ysgol Rhydygors is via a placement panel. All pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review Procedure.

Ysgol Rhydygors Behaviour Support Centre

RC

Mr C Saunders

ESBD

48

Mixed

Res

01267 231171

Staff1bss@rhydygors@ysgolccc.org.uk

               
 
 

Ammanford Infants

RC

Mrs M Davies

Obs/Ass

12 Junior

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Infant Observation and Assessment Unit is a short-term placement for up to 24 children 3+ to 7 years of age with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

Admission is via a placement panel. Either a Review/Resource or Placement panel also determines a recommendation for future placement.

 

Ammanford Infants

RC

Mrs M Davies

Obs/Ass

12 Infant

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Infant Observation and Assessment Unit is a short-term placement for up to 24 children 3+ to 7 years of age with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

Admission is via a placement panel. Either a Review/Resource or Placement panel also determines a recommendation for future placement.

 

Richmond Park

RC

Mr M Griffiths

Obs/Ass

12

Mixed

Day

01267 238298

Staff.richmond@ysgolccc.org.uk

Richmond Park Observation and Assessment Unit is a short-term placement for up to 15 children 3+ to 7 years of age with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

Admission is via placement panel. Either a Review/Resource or Placement panel also determines a recommendation for future placement.

 

Ysgol y Felin

RC

Mr R Roberts

Obs/Ass

12 Junior

Mixed

Day

01554750328

Head.babanod@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol y Felin

RC

Mr R Roberts

Obs/Ass

12 Infant

Mixed

Day

01554750328

Head.babanod@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol y Felin Observation and Assessment Unit is a short-term placement for up to 24 children 3+ to 7 years of age with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

Admission is via placement panel. Either a Review/Resource or Placement panel also determines a recommendation for future placement.

 

Ammanford Infants

RC

Mrs M Davies

S&L

8 FTE

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Infants Speech and Language Unit caters for 8 pupils from 3+ to 7 years of age whose primary difficulties is a specific speech and/or language disorder.

Admission is via placement panel. A Review Panel comprising of respective parents and professionals monitors the children’s progress. Most pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review and/or Review procedures.

 

Brynteg

RC

Mrs D Williams

S&L

8 FTE

Mixed

Day

01554 776168

head@brynteg.ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol Brynteg Junior Speech and Language Unit caters for 8 full time equivalent pupils from 7+ to 11 years of age whose primary difficulty is a specific speech and/or language disorder.

Admission is via placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review Procedure.

 

Ysgol y Felin

RC

Mr R Roberts

S&L

8

Mixed

Day

01554750328

Head.babanod@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol y Felin Speech and Language Unit caters for 8 pupils from 3+ to 7 years of age whose primary difficulties is a specific speech and/or language disorder.

Admission is via a placement panel. A Review Panel comprising of respective parents and professionals monitors the children’s progress. Most pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review and/or Review procedures

 

Ysgol Nantgaredig

RC

Mr G Morgan

S&L (Welsh Medium)

8 Junior

Mixed

Day

01267 290444

Staff.garedig@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol Nantgaredig

RC

Mr G Morgan

S&L (Welsh Medium)

8 Infant

Mixed

Day

01267 290444

Staff.garedig@ysgolccc.org.uk

The Infant Welsh medium Speech and Language Unit and the Junior Welsh medium Speech and Language Unit is located at Ysgol Nantgaredig and caters for 16 full time equivalent pupils from 3+ to 11 years of age whose first language is welsh and whose primary difficulties is a specific speech and/0r language disorder.

Admission is via placement panel. Most pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure or Review procedure.

 

Myrddin (Whitemill)

RC

Mr Julian Parker

SLD

21

Mixed

Day

01267 290517

Staff.myrddin@ysgolccc.org.uk

Whitemill Special Needs Unit caters for 24 pupils from 11+ to 19 years of age with various categories of special needs, which are severe and/or profound in nature.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ammanford Junior

RC

Mrs M Davies

SLD PMLD

24 Sec

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Special Needs Unit caters for 24 pupils from 3+ to 19 years of age with various categories of special needs, which are severe and/or profound in nature.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ammanford Junior

RC

Mrs M Davies

SLD PMLD

8 Jun

Mixed

Day

01269 592356

Staff.amanbab@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ammanford Special Needs Unit caters for 24 pupils from 3+ to 19 years of age with various categories of special needs, which are severe and/or profound in nature.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Myrddin CP

RC

Mr Julian Parker

SLD PMLD

21

Mixed

Day

01267 232626

Staff.myrddin@ysgolccc.org.uk

Myrddin Special Needs Unit caters for 24 pupils from 3+ to 11 years of age with various categories of special needs, which are severe and/or profound in nature.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ysgol Heol Goffa

SS

Mr P Newell

SLD PMLD

75

Mixed

Day

01554 759465

Head.heolgoffa@ysgolccc.org.uk

Heol Goffa is a day Special school for 75 full time equivalent pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) and severe learning difficulties from 3+ to 19 years of age. Boys and girls attend the school.

Admission to Heol Goffa is via placement panel. All pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ysgol y Felin

RC

Mr R Roberts

SLD PMLD

8 FTE

Mixed

Day

01554750328

Head.babanod@ysgolccc.org.uk

Name of Provision

Type

Headteacher

Nature of Provision

Capacity

Gender

Res/Day

Contact Tel & Email

Ysgol y Gwendraeth

Garreglwyd Unit

RC

Mr P Williams

ASD

12

Mixed

Day

01269 841322

admin@gwendraeth.carms.sch.uk

Garreglwyd Autistic Unit caters for 12 pupils from 11+ to 16 years of age on the Autistic Spectrum continuum.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ysgol Tregib (Resource base for pupils with severe Language Disorder)

MR

Mrs J Griffiths

ASD (Sec)

Up to 12 FTE SP+L

Mixed

Day

01558 823477

frontdesk@admin.tegib.org.uk

Ysgol Tregib Speech and Language Resource Base caters for 8 pupils from 11+ to 16 years of age whose primary difficulty is a specific speech and/or language disorder.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

 

Ysgol y Gwendraeth (The Cottage Managed Resource)

MR

Mr P Williams

ASD (Sec)

Up to 8 FTE ASD

Mixed

Day

01269 841322

admin@gwendraeth.carms.sch.uk

               

Ysgol Gyfun Maes Yr Yrfa

MR

Mr I Rees

ASD, Social Communication (Welsh Sec)

8

Mixed

Day

01269 833900

swyddfa@maesyryrfa.carms.sch.ukq

               

Newcastle Emlyn Secondary School

MR

Mr I McLoy

Dyslexia Centre (Sec)

 

Mixed

Day

01239 710447

admin@emlyn.carms.sch.uk

               

Queen Elizabeth High School (Regional Hub)

MR

Mr T Day

GLD/ASD/HI/VI/SLD/PMLD/SPLD (Sec)

56 FTE

Mixed

Day

01267 245300

office@qehs.carms.sch.uk

               

Ysgol Parcyrhun (Resource base for HI)

MR

Mr G Broderick

HI

Up to 8 FTE HI

Mixed

Day

01269 593398

staff@parcyrhun@ysgolccc.org.uk

Ysgol Parcyrhun Resource Base is a placement for 6 FTE pupils 3+ to 7 years of age with significant/severe hearing impairment.

Admission is via a placement panel. Pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs and are subject to the Annual Review procedure.

Name of Provision

Type

Headteacher

Nature of Provision

Capacity

Gender

Res/Day

Contact Tel & Email

Pwll PRU

PRU

Mr P Williams

KS3

21

Mixed

Day

01554 773548

pawilliams@carmarthenshire.gov.uk

               

2nd PRU (Location TBC)

PRU

Mr C Aplin

KS3

21

Mixed

Day

TBC

               

KS4 Project Programme

 

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1 A statement of Special Educational Needs is made where it is necessary for the LEA to determine the special educational provision that a child’s learning difficulty (Education Act 1996). These are made through a statutory, multi-disciplinary assessment, Statement and Resources Panel (Special Educational Needs Code of Practice for Wales 2002).

2 School Action is when a class teacher or the school Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO) identifies a child with Special Educational Needs and provides interventions that are additional to or different from those provided a part of the usual differentiated curriculum.

3 School Action Plus is where a review of School Action concludes that the child’s progress is still a matter of concern and, after further consultation, a new Individual Education Plan is developed under School Action Plus.

4 The WAO July 2007 Report “Good Practice in SEN Funding” highlights the unreliability and inadequacy of the current data collated by the Wales Assembly Government in relation to SEN expenditure, which does not provide a robust basis for comparison.

5 Statutory Assessment and Statements of SEN: In need of Review? Audit Commission 2002

6 The Complex Needs Panel is a multi-agency panel based on the Placement of Children in Wales 2007 Regulation, chaired by the Head of Children’s services which oversees requests for multi-agency funding and out of county placements.

7 The Child Development Team is a multidisciplinary health based team who work with children and young people with medical and developmental needs to co-ordinate services.

8 The Family Support Team is a multi-agency team offering specialist health visitor, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, social work and teaching support to children and young people with significant needs.

9 Special Needs Advisory Partnership (SNAP Cymru), is a parent partnership commissioned by the Service which offers independent guidance and support to parents concerned about the assessment, statementing and support given to their child.