Sustainable improvement is not achieved through piecemeal change.

Real and lasting improvement occurs when elements identified as instrumental to desired improvement are addressed simultaneously and in a way that they complement and support one another”

School Effectiveness Framework 2008

CONTENTS

DESCRIPTION

PAGE

   

BACKGROUND

7

   

KEY PRINCIPLES

7

Carmarthenshire's core values for inclusion

8

Inclusion in Carmarthenshire

9

Purpose of the Plan

10

   

Carmarthenshire pen-picture- September 2010

11

Pupil numbers and number of schools

The number of support staff

13

SEN/ALN data- the number of Statements

Pupils with SEN but no Statements

14

Special Units/Classes in Carmarthenshire

16

INCLUSION AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

18

EVIDENCE BASE FOR REVIEW AND DEVELOPING ACTIONS

21

   

EVIDENCE

23

The Learning Country: Vision into Action- 2008

24

School Perception Survey 2009

25

ESTYN Inspection 2009

27

ESTYN Action Plan

29

SEN Task and Finish Group

33

Budgeted Expenditure on SEN Provision 2010-2011

34

Special Educational Needs- Statements

38

Team around the Child Approach

43

SNAP Cymru Service Report- 2009-2010

44

Suggestions from staff members

46

   

KEY PRIORITIES FOR CARMARTHENHSIRE

47

   

APPENDICIES

49

1. Managing Behaviour in Carmarthenshire

51

2. Review of the funding of SEN/ALN

54

3. SNAP Data

57

4. Carmarthenshire SEN/ALN Provision

59

5. Carmarthenshire Behaviour Management Services

63

6. Acronyms/Definitions

64

BACKGROUND

This document sets out the ways in which the local authority plans to transform its inclusion services by introducing change and development for an improved service.

The Inclusion Division is an integral part of the Local Authority’s front line service to children and young people with additional learning and complex needs. It is a division which has a challenging role including the statutory responsibilities and providing support and intervention where necessary within a limited budget.

The Department has faced numerous challenges and changes in key personnel during the past 2 years. It is now time to consolidate our position, to review our performance and develop a concise, focused action plan which will address our main issue and challenges.

KEY PRINCIPLES

Carmarthenshire’s approach to inclusion is clearly articulated in the Inclusion Handbook for Schools. The Inclusion Strategy has 3 key purposes-

The following are our key statements-

Inclusion for All

Inclusive learning is the best practice in teaching and learning. A school's approach to teaching and learning involves:

Taken together, all of the above apply to effective whole school approaches to working with all children.

Carmarthenshire's core values for inclusion

We value:

BEING LEARNER-CENTRED- Placing the learner at the centre of all that we do by involving the learner in all planning and delivery to meet his or her needs.

Clearly, this needs to be linked to the individual’s capacity to understand and make informed decisions. However, the active involvement of all children and young people in developing plans to meet their needs should be evident in all that we do.

A DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACH- Personalising learning so that individuals can achieve their full potential.

We recognise that children and young people learn in different ways and at different speeds. The success of inclusion depends on children, whatever their level of learning, having the opportunity to learn in the way most effective for them.

A COMMITMENT TO ENABLING EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR ALL- This forms the core of our commitment to ensuring all make optimum progress and to ensuring that inclusion is not at the expense of achievement.

Inclusion involves ensuring that all children in the classroom can learn effectively. The child with special educational needs must be taught and supported in a way that ensures that s/he continues to make optimum progress. Equally, the inclusion of children with additional learning needs must be managed to ensure that in meeting their needs the learning of others is not jeopardised.

SHARING RESPONSIBILITY- Recognising that learners learn from each other, from their teachers, from those who provide additional support and from experiences at home and in the wider community.

Children learn in diverse ways and in different contexts. Inclusion involves maximising the opportunities children have to learn from as wide a range of experiences as possible.

WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP- Appreciating that by pooling our expertise and understanding, we are likely to achieve much more with and on behalf of the learner.

This means partnership with pupils, parents and professionals. It recognises that parents in particular will have knowledge and understanding of their children’s needs that may be pivotal to maximising learning.

BEING TRANSPARENT IN OUR METHODS- Being open in all that we do so that anyone can scrutinise, challenge and be able to see that our approach is both open and fair.

Achieving inclusion requires openness so that all can see children and young people receiving a fair and appropriate level of resourcing to ensure that they make progress.

USING EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE- Drawing on methods and approaches that have been proven to work, and where we innovate, properly monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of new approaches

We recognise that children and young people have one school career and that we must draw upon the best available evidence to deploy teaching and learning methods that have the best provenance of success. At times, this may mean giving up methods with which we have become comfortable and familiar and using approaches that have proven outcomes.

Developing and sustaining our commitment to working in ways that reflect these values requires an investment in reflective practice and review to ensure that the values-based focus of our practice is constantly renewed. Applying these values to the development of inclusive practice in Carmarthenshire helps define what inclusion means. This is set out in our Statement of Inclusion.


Purpose of the Plan

The Inclusion Action Plan for 2011–2014 has been drawn up to identify activities for change and development to improve services in Carmarthenshire. The plan is a working document to assist in the implementation of policy. The purpose of the plan is:

CARMARTHENSHIRE PEN PICTURE

September 2010

Pupil Numbers/ Number of Schools

Pupil numbers/Number of Schools

Carmarthenshire

Wales

Number of schools

134

1,826

Number of primary schools

115

1,478

Number of secondary schools

14

223

Number of pupils in primary schools

14,649

258,314

Number of pupils in secondary schools

12,392

205,421

Source: Welsh Assembly Government

The number of schools in Carmarthenshire by sector and number of pupils

 

Nursery School

Primary Schools

Secondary Schools

Special Schools

TOTAL

Number of schools

1

114

14

2

131

Number of pupils

84

14,274

12,238

115

27,804


The number of qualified teachers in Carmarthenshire by sector and sex

 

Nursery School

Primary Schools

Secondary Schools

Special Schools

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

 

0

4

143

728

289

520

9

13

Carmarthenshire

4

871

806

22


The number of support staff in Carmarthenshire by category

 

Higher Level Teaching Assistants

Other teacher assistants/aides employed in the classroom

Nursery Assistants (applies to Nursery)

Qualified nursery assistants (Applies to Primary)

All nursery assistants (Applies to Nursery and Primary)

CACHE students in training (Applies to Primary)

All CACHE students in training (Applies to Nursery and Primary)

Foreign language assistants (Applies to Secondary)

Unqualified ancillary staff who assist directly in the classroom (Applies to Special)

All special needs support staff (Applies to Secondary)

All special needs support staff (Applies to Secondary and Special)

Carmarthenshire

91.4

449.3

2

301.9

303.9

29.4

29.4

3.7

21

230.7

251.7

SEN/ALN Data- the number of Statements in Carmarthenshire

 

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Moderate learning difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Severe learning difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Profound and multiple learning difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Specific learning difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Physical and medical difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Hearing Impairment

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Visual Impairment

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Multi sensory impairment

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Speech, language and communication difficulties

Pupils with a statement of SEN- Behavioural emotional and social difficulties

Nursery

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Primary

26

51

36

27

63

47

17

6

1

66

49

Secondary

107

61

17

87

66

53

8

15

0

60

86

Special

0

52

23

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

39

TOTAL

133

164

76

114

130

100

23

21

1

126

174

Carmarthenshire pupils with SEN but no statement

 

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Moderate learning difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Severe learning difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Profound and multiple learning difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Specific learning difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Physical and medical difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Hearing Impairment

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Visual Impairment

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Multi sensory impairment

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Speech, language and communication difficulties

Pupils with SEN but no statement- Behavioural emotional and social difficulties

Nursery

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

Primary

2335

37

5

475

14

73

45

30

4

298

276

Secondary

1273

6

0

503

9

74

20

9

0

61

467

Special

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL

3608

43

5

978

23

147

65

39

4

364

743

Carmarthenshire County Council Data- 1069 pupils with Statements of SEN in Carmarthenshire.

 

No provision

School action

School Action Plus

Statements of SEN

Moderate learning difficulties

0

2884

724

133

Severe learning difficulties

0

15

28

164

Profound and multiple learning difficulties

0

1

4

76

Specific Learning difficulties

0

675

305

114

Autistic Spectrum Disorder

0

5

18

131

Physical and Medical Difficulties

0

51

96

101

Hearing impairment

0

20

45

25

Visual impairment

0

9

30

21

Multi sensory impairment

0

1

3

1

Speech, language and communication difficulties

0

123

241

126

Behavioural, Emotional and Social difficulties

0

319

427

177

 

19992

4103

1921

1069

The majority of these pupils are educated within mainstream schools. Carmarthenshire LA maintains a number of Special Educational Needs Units (these are small classes attached to mainstream schools, where pupils have opportunity for inclusion). At present we have the following type of provision-

- Special Units/Classes in Carmarthenshire -

Name of Special School/Unit

Capacity

KS 1

KS 2

KS3

KS4

Bro Banw Autistic Unit

6

   

Bro Banw O. & A. Unit 1

8

     

Bro Banw O. & A. Unit 2

8

     

Bro Banw Speech & Language

8

     

Bro Banw Special Unit - Infant/Junior SLD Class

8

   

Bro Banw Special Unit - PMLD Class

6

Bro Banw Special Unit - Senior SLD Class

10

   

Canolfan Elfed - Sensory Impaired

8 (FTE)

   

Canolfan Elfed - A.S.D.

17

   

Canolfan Elfed - P.M.L.D.

14

   

Canolfan Efled - M./S.L.D.

17

   

Canolfan y Gors

15

   

Garreglwyd

18

   

Heol Goffa

75

Maes-yr-Yrfa A.S.D. & Social Use of Language

8

   

Myrddin Autistic Unit

6

   

Myrddin Special Unit

22

   

Nantgaredig Speech & Language Unit (Infants)

8

     

Nantgaredig Speech & Language Unit (Junior)

8

 

   

Parc-yr-Hun Hearing Impaired Unit

8

   

Pwll Autistic Unit

6

   

Pwll Key Stage 3 T.L.C. Centre

21

   

 

Rhydygors Residential School

46

 

Rhydygors - Day Centre (Primary)

21

   

Rhydygors - Day Centre (Secondary)

21

   

Richmond Park O. & A. Unit

12

   

Tre-gib Speech & Lang & Communication Centre

30

   

Ysgol Bryn Teg Language Unit

10

   

Ysgol y Felin - Key Stage 2 Centre SLD

6

   

Ysgol y Felin Infant Language Unit

8

   

Ysgol y Felin O. & A. Unit 1

8

   

Ysgol y Felin O. & A. Unit 2

8

   

Alternative provision at KS3 includes a PRU with 21 places, and a vulnerable pupils’ group at KS4 for up to 12 pupils. EOTAS provision also includes a Home Tuition Service for pupils deemed as medically unfit to attend school. The Home Tuition Service also contributes to tailor-made packages for individual pupils.

The authority has two special schools- Rhydygors which can accommodate 46 residential pupils and Heol Goffa which can provide for 75 pupils with ALN/SEN. Rhydygors EBD School has recently developed a service for 15 pupils with emotional issues.

A number of pupils are educated outside the authority. In September 2010 the following pupil numbers were educated outside the authority-

Carmarthenshire Pupils registered at other LA Schools (incl. Post 16)

Bridgend

3 (Specialist Placements)

Total No. Pupils: 55

Total Expenditure: 855,556

Ceredigion

33

Neath Port Talbot

2

Pembrokeshire

8 (2 Specialist Placements)

Powys

1

Swansea

5

Carmarthenshire Pupils attending Independent Specialist Placements

Pre 16: 6

Total Expenditure: 222,389

Post 16: 9

Total expenditure: 554,701

In addition pupils from outside the authority attend our schools and specialist provisions-

Other LA pupils attending Ysgol Rhydygors Special School

Pembrokeshire

2

Total Pupils: 4

Income Projection: 91,607

Ceredigion

1

Neath Port Talbot

1 (Summer Term only - Post 16)

Other LA pupils attending Carmarthenshire Schools

Caerphilly

8

Total No. Pupils: 52

Income Projection: 622,545

Cardiff

4

Ceredigion

16

Merthyr Tydfil

1

Monmouthshire

1

Neath Port Talbot

5

Pembrokeshire

1

Powys

3

Surrey

1

Swansea

11

Torfaen

1

Currently Inclusion support for schools is made up of Educational Psychologists, Pupil Progress Officers, Advisory Teachers for Dyslexia, Autism, Speech and Language, English as an Additional Language, Traveller Education and Behaviour Support Teachers.

A key statutory responsibility for the department is to provide advice to the LA about pupils who are undergoing statutory assessment. However, the major role is to contribute to the national and local agenda for raising achievements of all children and young people, but particularly those with ALN and work in partnership with colleagues to support schools in building their capacity to address the needs of all their pupils.

The authority is committed to working jointly with SWAMWAC authorities on joint planning and provision of SEN services on a sub-regional basis.

INCLUSION AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

Functional Framework






Additional Learning Needs Manager (1)

 

Social Inclusion and Behaviour Manager (1)

 

Governors Support Manager(1)




STATUTORY TEAM (4)

To ensure that the Local Authority fulfils its statutory functions in relation to Statements of Additional Educational Needs. This is managed by a team of 4 members of staff through the Assessment Panel.

 

BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT (6)

The BSCT (Behaviour Support Community Team) works with schools to support them in changing the behaviour of individual pupils by working with the pupil, their parents/carers and the teacher(s).

 

SCHOOL GOVERNANCE (3)

Support for School Governors and Clerks

Maintains a database of all school governors and facilitates the elections of new governors

Provides a Training Programme for both new and experienced Governors, Chairs and Clerks

Prepares the Termly Agenda and provides the accompanying papers.

         

SUPPORT FOR PUPILS WITH ALN (4)

To provide support for pupils with ALN via the Directors Panel, this meets on a fortnightly basis.

The monitoring of support for pupils with ALN and use of ALN resources in schools is managed by the Pupil Progress Officers (3)

 

THE KS3 TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTRE- PWLL PRU (13)

This is a county pupil referral unit for pupils in Years 7-9 who are deemed at risk of exclusion or who have been permanently excluded from school.

THE KS4 VULNERABLE PUPILS’ PROGRAMME

This is a provision for pupils in KS4 who have failed to engage in school and with alternative provision such as SMART and FACE, and are consequently out of school.

 

ADMISSIONS

Provides information and advice to parents regarding School Admissions and Transfers.

Deals with Schools Admission requests.

Deals with all Primary to Secondary School transfers.

Arranges School Admissions Appeals.

       

ADVISORY SUPPORT (3.6)

The LA funds three advisory teachers with specialism in Dyslexia, Autism, Speech and Language who support schools and our specialist placements. (3) We also provide Music Therapy (0.6)

   

OTHER

Services the following bodies: Shadow/ Temporary Governing Bodies, The Admissions Forum., The Standing Advisory Committee for Religious Education (SACRE).

Issues an annual 'Information for Parents' booklet that provides guidelines and information to parents whose children are moving to a new school and to those parents who intend moving into Carmarthenshire.

In collaboration with the lead advisor on Outdoor Education certain categories of School Educational Visits are administered by the department's staff.

Together with SWAMWAC (The South, Mid and West Wales Consortium) information and advice is sourced to schools on Performance Management issues.

       

METAS (10)

The METAS service comprises of two elements- provides support for pupils who have English as an Additional Language (7) and provides support to pupils from a Travellers background (2). There is 1 manager.

 

    AALTON HOUSE TUITION CENTRE (3.8)

This is a county pupil referral unit for pupils of secondary age who are deemed to have emotional and/or mental health difficulties, and who require a safe, nurturing environment in which to learn Referrals to the Centre are made by schools through the County’s Placement Panel. The service is being relocated to Rhydygors EBD School.

 

SPECIALIST PROVISION

The ALN Manager coordinates the work of our 17 School Centres. This includes managing the Placement Panel which discusses and agrees the best placement for pupils with ALN.

 

RHYDYGORS BEHAVIOUR CENTRE (DAY PROVISION)

This is a provision for primary and KS3 pupils who need sustained, intensive support in learning to manage their behaviour.

   
   

 

ALTERNATIVE TO STATEMENTING PROJECT

The Authority is developing a pilot on behalf of WAG’s Statutory Reform Group. Working in partnership with Torfaen on the Statements or Something Better? Pilot but concentrating on complex needs / multiagency model. (3)

 

HOME/ INDIVIDUAL TUITION SERVICE (1 FTE, 24 PT)

This is a provision for pupils aged 5 -18 who are deemed temporarily unfit by a medical practitioner to attend school for medical reasons.

 
       

Unlocking the Potential of Special Schools (Phase 2)

Working in partnership with our two special schools on this WAG funded project ‘Helping mainstream schools to engage with hard to reach families to ensure better outcomes for children with EBD and Disabilities.’

 

ELECTIVE HOME EDUCATION

To coordinate the education of all pupils who have opted for Elective Home Education.

 
       

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

A variety of course and resources are available to schools to support their work in managing ALN. A number of course are available through the Better Schools Funding programme, in addition to tailor-made courses for individual schools devised in partnership with schools.

 

EXCLUSIONS (1)

This Service advises schools on permanent exclusions and works with the Governors section on placements and/or provision for any pupils out of school.

 
       

SENCO FORUM

The ALN Manager coordinates the work of the SENCO Forum- a vehicle to share good practice, discuss challenges and developments as well as address process and procedure issues

 

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

A variety of course and resources are available to schools to support their work in managing challenging behaviour. A number of course are available through the Better Schools Funding programme, in addition to tailor-made courses for individual schools devised in partnership with schools.

 

C. EVIDENCE BASE FOR REVIEW AND DEVELOPING ACTIONS

The evidence used to compile our action plan will include-

In addition we have considered the following initiatives when developing this action plan-

This evidence and information gleaned from discussions and meetings with a range of officers and stakeholders during 2009/2010 reinforce the need to update and further develop Carmarthenshire’s Action Plan.


The Learning Country: Vision into Action- 2008

Promote inclusion in education and learning

To do this we will:


SCHOOL PERCEPTION SURVEY 2009

The survey undertaken in the summer was made up of 80 core questions and 14 local Carmarthenshire questions. 47% (64 out of 135) of schools responded, a significant increase from the disappointing 29% in 2007. The response rate compares relatively favourably to the national average response rate of 52%, but there remains significant room for improvement.

The core survey covers six areas:

The good news

Of the 64 average scores that had improved since 2007, the following 31 questions were those rated significantly better (an improvement of 5% or more since 2007):

Ref

Question

%

Score

G12

How well your council facilitates multi-agency working

+10

2.65

F4

The efficiency with which statutory assessments of pupils with ALN are made

+6

2.73

F13

The effectiveness of educational psychology support

+5

2.69

The not so good news

The following 6 questions were rated Satisfactory (3) or below:

Ref

Question

Score

%

F7

The effectiveness of the council's assessment of and provision for pupils with ALN through the medium of Welsh

3.26

-7

F10

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils from minority ethnic groups, refugee families and Traveller communities

3.10

-5

F9

The effectiveness of your council's support for meeting the needs of pupils with English as an additional language

3.03

-7

The following 19 questions were rated in the worst quartile (in comparison to the rest of Wales):

Ref

Question

Score

Welsh average

%

F7

The effectiveness of the council’s assessment of and provision for pupils with ALN through the medium of Welsh

3.26

2.70

-7

F10

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils from minority ethnic groups, refugee families and Traveller communities

3.10

2.59

-5

F9

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils with English as an additional language

3.03

2.65

+8

F13

The effectiveness of educational psychology support

2.69

2.38

+5

F12

The effectiveness of specialist learning support

2.60

2.43

+1

Of the 28 average scores that had declined since 2007, the following 9 questions were those rated significantly poorer (a decline of 5% or more since 2007):

Ref

Question

%

Score

F7

The effectiveness of the council’s assessment of, and provision for, pupils with ALN through the medium of Welsh

-7

3.26

F9

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils with English as an additional language

-7

3.03

F3

The clarity of your council’s rationale for the deployment of ALN funding

-6

2.85

F2

Your council’s planning of ALN provision to meet identified needs

-6

2.71

F10

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils from minority ethnic groups, refugee families and Traveller communities

-5

3.10

Qualitative comments

Schools had an opportunity to add additional qualitative comments when responding to the survey. Out of a total of 95 comments received, 16 (17%) were positive, 14 (15%) were neutral, and 65 (68%) were negative. These are summarised below.

Additional learning needs (10 received)

Additional comments (47 received)

Action Plan

F2

Your council's planning of ALN provision to meet identified needs

The departments Inclusion Strategy and Development Plan will be updated by the end of the Summer term 2010 and respond to additional needs and newly identified challenges.

F3

The clarity of your council’s rationale for the deployment of ALN funding

This is an issue which is being addressed. A working party has been set up to look at different models of allocating funding

F7

The efficiency with which statutory assessments of pupils with ALN are made

This contradicts what was noted in the 2009 ESTYN Inspection Report- ‘There are good arrangements for the identification and statutory assessment of pupils with ALN …The authority meets the statutory requirements of the SEN and Disability Act (2001). Statutory processes are well planned and co-ordinated. Statements are well written and appropriately detailed to clearly specify pupils’ needs, educational objectives and provision. Over the past year, 97.1% of statements have been completed within statutory time limits. ….’ I plan to prepare a short presentation to SENCO’s/HT’s regarding the process to improve their understanding.

F8

Your council’s effectiveness in developing your school’s capacity to meet the needs of pupils with ALN

BSF monies are used to provide a range of training events throughout the year- these include training for school SENCO, Autism, ELKLAN, Teaching Talking and Dyslexia. Pupil Progress Officers visit schools on a regular basis and schools are supported by Educational Psychologists and a range of Advisory Teachers. ESTYN confirms this- ‘Specialist teachers, Pupil Progress Officers, support workers and educational psychologists provide schools with good support.’ Again this issue depends on individual school experience and improved communication.

F9

Your council’s effectiveness in monitoring the progress of pupils with ALN at your school

This was also an issue identified by ESTYN. This is now part of our Action Plan- PPO’s have been deployed to take on this monitoring role. In addition there is a schools Audit of ALN which includes aspects of monitoring of provision.

F10

The effectiveness of your council’s support for meeting the needs of pupils from minority ethnic groups, refugee families and Traveller communities

The 2009 ESTYN report contradicts this view- ‘Effective collaboration has improved the support for learners with English as an additional language (EAL) and gypsies and travellers. Attainment outcomes for these groups have improved, specifically for EAL learners whose language acquisition levels progress swiftly from term to term.’ However the department is reviewing current provision at Bynea and the work of the MEAS team.

F13

The effectiveness of specialist learning support

The LEA has a range of specialist provisions to meet the needs of pupils. The LEA in partnership with WAG and Pembrokeshire invested in the new Canolfan Elfed hub and as part of the Dinefwr developments there are discussions regarding extending current provision. Inspections of schools with specialist provision have been successful.


ESTYN INSPECTION, MAY 2009

In May 2009 Carmarthenshire Local Education Authority was inspected by ESTYN. The report was complimentary and identified good practice. However, issues were identified as being in need of further development. There were three main recommendations with direct reference to the Inclusion Department-


In addition in the main text of the report there were other issues identified which need to be developed/resolved (
highlighted in red)-

Promoting social inclusion and wellbeing

Performance: Grade 2: Good features and no important shortcomings

Prospects for improvement: Grade 2: Improvement prospects are good, with no major barriers

Additional learning needs (ALN)

Performance: Grade 2: Good features and no important shortcomings

Prospects for improvement: Grade 2: Improvement prospects are good, with no major barriers

ESTYN ACTION PLAN

In response to the report the Authority developed and Action Plan to address the recommendations. Here are the recommendation in relation to inclusion and the most recent update-

3. Improve the capacity of the service by developing further, more cohesive, working between Pupil Progress Officers, Educational Psychologists, and School Improvement Officers

How will it be achieved?

PROGRESS

Further development of the integrated approach to working across divisions via the following work streams- TaPPaS, TAC, Area Teams and Strategic Area Teams.

All the professionals listed, Pupil Progress Officers, Educational Psychologists, and School Improvement Officers, are involved in professional discussions regarding standards, whole area issues and areas/aspects to develop. e.g. Llanelli Team developed a ‘Safeguarding/Child Protection Toolkit.

Regular discussions at the ‘Opening Doors’ forum in relation to this issues and the development of integrated management team meetings across education, inclusion and children’s services will support further progress.

The development of the Team Around the Child (TAC) will enable a more integrated and well thought-out approach to supporting specific children. In addition the placing of TAC under the management of the Corporate Parenting Officer will provide a more coherent and structured approach to its development and a crucial link with Education Welfare Service.

The co-location of most of the education staff at Parc Dewi has enabled a more coherent, integrated approach to delivering an innovative and integrated department that supports all children and young people and encourages lifelong learning. Being situated in one place has improved communication.

Continue the practice of regular meetings of lead professionals from a range of divisions (SIO, PPO, Ed. Psych, EWO, and Finance Officers) to support and challenge schools.

Regular meetings are arranged where Pupil Progress Officers, Educational Psychologists, and School Improvement Officers work together to identify schools who have good practice or require additional support.

All officers contribute to and work collaboratively with colleagues on a departmental approach to challenging and supporting schools and learning settings. A lead School Improvement Officer compiles a report of issues and officers best placed to address them. This document is a ‘live’ document which is updated and discussed regularly. In 2009/10 the integrated group met as follows-

September 2nd, 2009- full day- to discuss schools who require support/challenge

March 2nd, 2010- Support and Challenge- update

July 15th 2010- Support and Challenge- Progress and issues

Develop one system of recording, storing and sharing information and data regarding standards and issues.

The issue of sharing information and data is being addressed. There have been initial meetings between Heads of Service and managers in relation to availability and validity of data. An Action Plan needs to be devised to agree the way forward on a schools and LEA basis.

Embedding the role and responsibilities of the Pupil Progress Officers in regard to monitoring SEN/ALN in order to ensure effective practice.

At present Pupil Progress Officers are the key personnel in supporting schools with applications for support and specialist placements. The processes are bureaucratic and time consuming. Work is underway to release Pupil Progress Officers from some of their administrative duties in order that they can develop and undertake their monitoring roles. Their Job Descriptions include reference to-

    1. to challenge schools in terms of their:

      assessment for learning including diagnostic assessment

      support planning of interventions

      and where necessary target setting

      teaching and learning

      monitoring and progress reviews

      analysis of outcomes

As from September 2010 schools will have to take responsibility for requests for resources and specialist placements thus releasing PPO time to visit schools and evaluate the impact of approaches and investment in specific groups/pupils.

Develop a shared conversation with schools regarding standards, linked with the mid-term review, including the Educational Psychologist, PPO, SIO and Chair of Governors where appropriate and relevant.

Pupil Progress Officers/ALN Advisory Teachers will form part of the core team of professionals involved in mid-term reviews of schools. They will monitor inclusion and provision for ALN as well as contribute to whole team discussions in regard to standards and practice. In addition the Inclusion Department will audit the provision for pupils with ALN in schools causing concern or where there are specific ALN issues.

4. Develop robust exit criteria to manage Statemented and School Action Plus in order to deploy resources better and improve resource delegation

How will it be achieved?

PROGRESS

Ensuring the of use robust criteria for allocating support, issue timed interventions and provide schools with clear guidelines on their responsibilities.

Panels are far more structured and a clear protocol is followed. Panel membership reflects a range of experienced stakeholders including Headteachers, SENCOS, Educational Psychologists, Pupil Progress Officers and Managers who are well informed in relation ALN and provision. Panel protocols have been further reviewed recently with a greater emphasis on schools taking the lead.

Decisions are thoroughly discussed and carefully noted in order that all concerned, schools and LA, are clear about the decisions and actions required. Applications are refused if there is lack of evidence. Panels often ask for further information and evidence of involvement of other professionals before allocating resources. Often resources allocated are time-related in order that there is an opportunity to evaluate impact and adjust approaches e.g. 2 hrs teaching support for 2 terms

Regular meetings with school SENCO’s enable managers to highlight areas of concern and address aspects of monitoring and respective responsibilities. There workshops have proved useful for all concerned and an opportunity to develop inclusion and inclusive practices within our schools.

WAG funded project to look at an alternative to statementing will ensure better and improved resource delegation.

The Alternative to Statements for pupils with Complex Needs Pilot is progressing well. The work was showcased at the National Inclusion Conference in Llandudno, March 25th/26th and in a further conference in June. Lessons learned from this exercise will inform discussions in relation to mainstream support for ALN and the future direction of statements.

Develop an ethos of shared ownership of resources and the ability of schools/SENCO’s in partnership with Pupil Progress Officers to deliver high quality annual review meetings which effectively assess progress and critically look at provision.

SENCO Training has referred to roles and responsibilities, the quality of evidence, ALN processes, annual reviews as well as SENCO/ Headteacher roles in tribunals. (i.e. LA witness). Further work needs to be done to ensure that schools develop annual reviews as robust, challenging and effective means of measuring progress and adjusting support levels for pupils with ALN.

Further develop the capacity of the Pupil Progress Officers to monitor the use and effect of allocated resources.

Work is underway to release Pupil Progress Officers from some of their administrative duties in order that they can develop and undertake their monitoring roles. As from September 2010 schools will have to take responsibility for requests for resources and specialist placements thus releasing PPO time to visit schools and evaluate the impact of approaches and investment in specific groups//pupils.

Discuss/research and develop an alternative method of allocating SEN/ALN resources currently held centrally through dialogue with lead professionals and visiting other LAs in Wales.

Working Party for Support Outside of Statements (WPSOS) formed to look at different methods of allocating ALN resources to schools. Through visiting other authorities/obtaining copies of different funding mechanisms a preferred model has been identified which is being researched in more detail. A model is being developed for consultation during the Autumn Term, 2010.

Develop the Inclusion area of AMDRO to share information and guidance.

This has been delayed due to the fact that the AMDRO website is being transferred to another software package (SharePoint) which will be easier for officers to manage and update. Inclusion division staff are being requested to provide information and guidance which could be hosted on the site. The newly appointed Statementing Officer will take a lead role in coordinating the division’s content as well as updating information for parents. The Governance Research and Development Officer will provide IT support, designing the site and supporting staff members with IT issues.


SEN TASK AND FINISH GROUP

At its meeting in November 2007, the Education and Children’s Services Scrutiny Committee therefore resolved to establish a Scrutiny Task and Finish Group to review this area. The Committee agreed the main aim of the Group was to investigate how the Authority and its partners meet the needs of growing numbers of children with disability and Special Educational Needs.

The Group agreed that it should focus on three key areas:

The group made 15 recommendations, 10 of which are relevant to this review (in bold)

R2: To acknowledge the efficient use of existing resources and recognise that only limited further efficiency gains are possible in the future. (Short term)

R3: To acknowledge that the rise in diagnosis and demand may require a significant enhancement of budget in the next 2 to 3 years. (Medium term/ Financial implications)

R4: To review and report to the Education and Children’s Services Scrutiny Committee the progress made with the approach of focusing on pupil progress and their linked level of support in three years time, when the Children and Young People Plan 2008-11 is due to be reviewed (Medium term)

R5: To review the method of delegated funding to special schools to take account of pupils attending compared with the planned capacity of the schools. (Short term)

R6: To review multi agency diagnostic process for Autism and capacity to significantly reduce overall time from initial consultation to final diagnoses. (Medium term)

R8: To work with the school to help identify additional funding opportunities for more surround sound systems for the Ysgol Parcyrhun Hearing Resource Base. (Short term)

R9: To bid for regional resources to co-ordinate the modification of curriculum resources for children with Special Educational Needs. (Short term)

R11: To include the special schools and all specialist units in the school stock condition survey to be undertaken in 2008/09 and to prioritise the refinement and renewal of the current specialist provision within the Modernising Education Programme. (Medium term/ Financial Implications)

R14: To examine further opportunities to reduce the need for out of county placements by investing in local provision. (Short Term)

R15: To review the level of the capital budget established for DDA adaptations in schools as the Accessibility Strategy is developed. (Medium term)


BUDGETED EXPENDITURE ON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (SEN) PROVISION: 2010-11

Key points in 2010-11

Delegated SEN expenditure

thousand

Non-delegated SEN expenditure

thousand

Nursery Schools

8

   

Primary Schools

5,775

School budgets

4,375

Secondary Schools

4,734

Inter-authority recoupment

1020

Special Schools

2,911

LEA budget

1965

Total

13,428

Total

7,350

Post-16 SEN Funding Analysis 2010/11

    LEA Maintained Special Schools in County

    Placements in other authorities’ mainstream or special

    Specialist Out of County Placements in other LAs

    TOTAL

    TOTAL of these with Statements

    Cost to Education of Out of county Specialist Places

    Budget short fall for LA's own Special Schools

    Have LA's made up the shortfall in delegated budgets?

    LA's central budget shortfall for Out of county placements

    Cost to Health

    Cost to Social Services

No's

No's

No's

No

No's

Yes / No

34

12

9

55

55

900,008

72,376

Yes

135,001

164,958

194,747

Funding of ALN within Carmarthenshire

The Local Authority (LA) has sought to implement an inclusive approach towards the education of pupils with special educational needs (SEN). Wherever possible, pupils are taught in their local mainstream schools with the LA supporting schools in helping to meet the needs of SEN pupils. Schools are responsible for drawing up and implementing individual education plans (IEPS) for their pupils with SEN. A range of services and provisions are made available to support these pupils and to complement the school based work provided by the school from their delegated monies.

Funding through the Age Weighted Pupil Unit

Schools in Carmarthenshire receive the majority of their funding through the pupil driven funding element: the Age Weighted Pupil Unit (AWPU). This means that every pupil of the same age in a mainstream school receives an equivalent level of resource to fund a broad range of educational activities which all schools are reasonably expected to provide. This includes the school's response to the special educational needs which children may have for some time in their school career. These activities will need to be undertaken to some degree in all schools though the size and scope of this provision may be varied.

All children, including those with special educational needs are full members of the school community. This means that schools have to be prepared to meet the needs of all their pupils when they plan the broad activities of school life.

Each school receives an allocation of funding for pupils without Statements through its delegated formula budget. It is assumed that a notional amount (5%) is to be used by schools for special educational needs provision.

Individual resources are allocated to pupils with significant levels of SEN via statements or through subsequent audits or annual reviews.

Provision for SEN in AWPU

This funding is expected to cover the following activities: -

Resourced Provision Funding and Central Support Services

Special School Funding

The authority has 2 special schools- Heol Goffa and Rhydygors. The funding mechanism is based on a number of planned places and upon individual pupil's needs.

YSGOL HEOL GOFFA (From ESTYN Report 2010)

YSGOL RHYDYGORS (From ESTYN Report 2010)

There has been concern expressed about the future of special schools. However their future is a strong one given that more and more babies are surviving at the margins of life often with consequent ongoing multiple and complex additional learning needs.

The special school, Heol Goffa, and the linked units for pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties, together with the regional hub at Queen Elizabeth High School all have staff with highly developed specialist skills.

The authority will work with these provisions to develop ways of enabling them to share their skills and expertise with colleagues in mainstream settings. By so doing we will raise the capacity of mainstream schools to include pupils with complex needs.

Our special schools have won a two year grant from the Welsh Assembly Government under its ‘Unlocking Potential’ initiative to enable these specialist settings to begin to share their expertise with the mainstream.

Rhydygors and Heol Goffa schools have employed a team of Learning Support Assistants who:-

Centrally held Funding for Pupils with SEN

The centrally held funding for SEN is split into a number of categories with various funding mechanisms for each heading. The main categories are: -

These comprise Educational Psychologists, Behaviour Support Service, Sensory Service, Special Needs Service Teachers and Statementing Team. The level of support and services provided to schools and/or individual pupils is determined by the school population and severity of need. In addition we have Service level Agreements with agencies which provide us with a specific service- Speech and Language (Hywel Dda Health Trust), advocacy for parents/carers (SNAP Cymru).

This is centrally funded but provided at school level. This resource complements the support provided by school and provides additional classroom support to specific children with a variety of difficulties. The Director’s Panel, a moderation panel of officers and school representatives, determines resource allocation to schools for the support of individual pupils. In addition, expensive specialist equipment (e.g. hoists, laptops, specialist seating etc) are purchased for individual pupils.

In some cases, where specialist provision is not available within Carmarthenshire Local Authority, it is necessary to secure Out of County provision. The placement would either be with another Local Authority or an independent school. These cases are discussed and agreed at the Complex Needs Panel which is a multi-agency panel of education, Children’s Services and Health professionals. Where appropriate, the Local Authority secures joint funding arrangements with Children Service and/or the Local Health Board.


Special educational needs: statements

A statement of special educational needs (SEN) sets out your child's needs and the help they should have. It is reviewed annually to ensure that any extra support given continues to meet your child's needs.

Statementing data

According to January 2010 PLASC data 27,026 pupils were registered in Carmarthenshire schools and provisions. The Statistic Wales publication ‘Pupils with Statements of SEN, January 2010’ note that 1,047 of Carmarthenshire pupils had a statement. This equates to a percentage of 3.87%. This has reduced over the last few years but is still above the all Wales average of 3%.

It means that a disproportionate share of additional learning needs resources in the form of teachers, SENCOs, educational psychologists, learning support officers and advisory teachers is taken up with the preparation of formal advice for statutory assessments, the preparation of statements and the undertaking and reporting by way of formal annual review. All this bureaucracy means that these specialist professionals are spending much of their time on paperwork and too little in working with children, parents, carers and colleagues to enhance children’s learning.

This bureaucracy brings rigidity to the process of meeting additional learning needs that means at school level there is a marked reduction in flexibility and responsiveness to need. Too often schools have to wait 6 months in order to be able to respond and react to a statement rather than be proactive in using local, flexible resources with which to meet priority needs.

In part this situation exists because the statementing process has become the vehicle by which schools and parents secure additional resources to ensure their children’s needs are met.

Alternative to Statements Project

After several years of consultation with parents, carers, professionals and voluntary organisations the need to change the current statutory framework for children and young people with additional learning needs (ALN) has now moved into the next phase.

Background

The National Assembly for Wales (Legislative Competence) (Education and Training) Order 2008 was approved by Privy Council on 9 April 2008. The Assembly is now able to make changes, by way of an Assembly Measure, to the statutory assessment process in Wales.

Proposal for making changes based on consultation with parents, professionals and children:

The aim is to have a uniquely Welsh approach that is embedded in the principles of inclusive education and in line with the School Effectiveness Framework:

In 2008 WAG commissioned a 2 year pilot to consider what an alternative to a statement would look like. It was envisaged that any alternative would need to be in line with the ‘Support and Challenge’ agenda and a wider expectation of inclusion. The intended outcomes of statutory reform are:

Four inter-linked pilot projects across eight of the Welsh authorities are looking at developing a new more effective framework that supports children, young people and their families. The Welsh Assembly Government now has the legislative powers to make the changes to the statutory system that will hopefully ensure better outcomes for children and families as well as protecting their rights and entitlements.

In Carmarthenshire, we are developing a flexible, multiagency Individual Development Plan (IDP) that will support children / young people, 0 – 25 years, with complex needs. The IDP is a single, 24 hour plan for the child across all settings and services, which is truly holistic and based on the functional needs of the child. The intention is that the IDP uses a person centred approach, putting the individual at the centre of their own plan but with the wrap around support of the family, the community and the partner services.

Colleagues in Torfaen are developing an online IT system which would be a common planning tool with all the functional information about the child in one place. This would also facilitate real-time communication of the relevant changes in the child’s life to all concerned, including parents and most importantly, the child them-selves.

The proposed IDP would also en-compass children with less complex needs, who are currently supported at School Action and School Action Plus, and indeed all children could benefit from their own individual plan. At this level, an IDP would be developed by the school in partner-ship with parents and any outside supporting agencies e.g. educational psychologist or therapists. (Pembrokeshire and Bridgend)

So what’s different?

Current bureaucratic processes, coupled with a lack of communication between partner agencies can be a barrier to working effectively with children and families. The cost, not only in monetary terms for professionals, but in stress, anxiety and time for families can also be very high. A truly multiagency approach, encompassing education, health and social care, which funds flexible support pack-ages based on the child’s current and future needs, certainly appears to be the way forward. However, the key to the success of this approach is good, effective communication. This will enable parents to develop trust in professionals who are committed to providing a robust wrap around package of support for their children.

For parents and professionals alike, it is important to examine the services we provide and receive, and ask ourselves could we be doing a better job? Are our aims realistic, relevant and appropriate? Are we asking too much, or are we selling our children and young people short? At this time of financial uncertainty, it is vital we work together with families and services to provide the best possible out-comes for our children at an affordable price. Communication, negotiation and sometimes compromise are needed to work towards these aims.

Pilot schemes:

Other reform developments

Developments to date

Many authorities in Wales are already reducing statements and many are now utilizing the tools developed by the pilot group. Each of the authorities leading on the 4 pilot areas above is able to offer authorities the tools and training to implement the changes. This can have a very practical impact on helping authorities to reduce statements prior to the legislative changes in 2013.

Number of Statements issued per LEA

LEA

2003/04

2005/06

2009/10

Reduction

Blaenau Gwent

464

426

385

79

Bridgend

374

345

330

44

Caerphilly

1034

989

948

86

Cardiff

1754

1772

1761

0

Carmarthenshire

1077

1208

1047

30

Ceredigion

437

462

302

135

Conwy

808

735

459

349

Denbighshire

665

586

443

222

Flintshire

1087

942

759

328

Gwynedd

732

738

525

207

Merthyr Tydfil

240

200

185

55

Monmouthshire

435

456

510

0

Neath Port Talbot

852

744

724

128

Newport

1286

1069

927

359

Pembrokeshire

625

516

403

222

Powys

846

930

680

166

Rhondda Cynon Taf

666

643

611

55

Swansea

1182

1235

1419

0

Torfaen

507

427

293

214

Vale of Glamorgan

446

437

478

0

Wrexham

950

856

758

192

Ynys Mon

492

467

380

112

Number of tribunals per LEA

LEA

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

20010-

Blaenau Gwent

2

0

3

4

2

1

2

 

 

Bridgend

7

2

2

2

3

1

0

   

Caerphilly

7

3

1

3

12

2

9

 

 

Cardiff

28

35

33

37

26

19

19

   

Carmarthenshire

8

5

6

5

5

19

17

12

 

Ceredigion

2

1

2

2

2

1

2

 

 

Conwy

1

8

4

1

6

8

4

   

Denbighshire

1

0

6

2

4

2

0

 

 

Flintshire

7

3

2

0

1

1

4

 

 

Gwynedd

3

3

3

2

1

2

2

   

Merthyr Tydfil

1

0

2

1

2

0

0

 

 

Monmouthshire

2

5

8

11

9

8

8

 

 

Neath Port Talbot

4

6

7

14

2

3

3

   

Newport

5

15

30

45

19

2

8

   

Pembrokeshire

24

0

2

0

2

0

0

 

 

Powys

7

7

3

5

7

3

1

   

Rhondda Cynon Taf

1

4

2

3

4

5

0

   

Swansea

3

7

5

7

4

5

7

 

 

Torfaen

13

3

4

1

4

9

5

 

 

Vale of Glamorgan

8

8

0

1

2

2

0

   

Wrexham

2

2

1

2

0

1

0

   

Ynys Mon

0

0

1

2

1

0

1

 

 

How the changes are being implemented in relation to the pilot areas:

The pilot has raised a number of questions on wider statutory education provision:

What Carmarthenshire has achieved to date as part of the pilot:

Alongside Torfaen LEA Carmarthenshire have produced a model of an Individual Development Plan (IDP).

The IDP:

The model is based on principles developed through multi-agency working in the area of complex needs in Carmarthenshire between 2004- 2009. This approach significantly reduced the need for expensive out of county placements and ensured that Health, Education and Social Care contributed to meeting the needs of children with complex needs in their own community.

WAG is confident that the Carmarthenshire IDP will form the basis of statutory reform of statements for complex needs and will have a wider use for all children who require additional services or who have greater levels of need. Further, WAG has acknowledged that implementing a more multiagency approach to meeting the needs of learners will require changes in Health and Social Care legislation.

Trends of provision for Complex Needs in Carmarthenshire

Risks and Challenges

The Welsh Assembly Government provided Carmarthenshire with 154,079.36 to develop the tools for this pilot and share expertise across the 22 authorities.

Carmarthenshire pilot leads and the work they have produced is being utilised by other authorities and the Welsh Assembly Government has acknowledged the work to be of a very high standard and at the forefront of developing holistic multiagency Individual Development Plans for children without the need for Statutory Statements.

Reducing or removing statements to offer a more flexible and responsive intervention for children requires significant remodelling of services, delegation of funds, the embedding of quality assurance systems and a cultural shift in attitude. The pilot offers a vast array of support to help authorities achieve this. In 2013 the piloted model will be rolled out across Wales. Carmarthenshire has an opportunity to get a ‘head start’ through having a key role in the pilot.

The Challenge (from evidence)


The proposed development of a Team around the Child (TAC) approach across Carmarthenshire.

The department has made good progress in interagency working across health, education, social care and voluntary sector provision. The department’s inter-agency work is consistently praised in inspections by ESTYN and the CSSIW and multi-agency practice for children with complex needs is contributing towards the all Wales statutory reform agenda. However, with the ever increasing demand for specialist services and diminishing resources being available for prevention and early intervention it is crucial that we maximise the potential of inter agency working still further.

We need to ensure that:

The TAC paper (Appendix) aims to outline a model of how Carmarthenshire can achieve greater interagency effectiveness through the implementation of a Team Around the Child (TAC) approach to problem solving and planning services for vulnerable children and young people.

Specifically the paper will:

PROPOSED TIMEFRAME FOR IMPLEMENTATION

On agreement of Heads of Services to implement this proposal the timescales for implementation are as follows:

December 2010- Consultation Internally; Consultation with key CYPP partners;

January 2011- Appraisal and review of new and existing EWO job specs;

January 2011- Advertise Team manager Post and appoint

September 2010- Permanent transfer of further posts


SNAP CYMRU-SERVICE REPORT- 2009-2010

As part of our statutory duty the department has to provide Parent partnership services-


As an Authority we have a Service Level Agreement with SNAP Cymru who provides parents with accurate information, objective advice and support for a range of issues including assessments, statements of special educational needs, bullying, school attendance, exclusion, health and social care provision and discrimination.

On an annual basis SNAP Cymru provides the authority with a detailed report and analysis of the service usage. The 2009-10 report raises some key issues and challenges-

Key issues arising for service users:

The referrals that have come into the service this year have been, in the main, very complex cases requiring a great deal of input. If we average out the figures above for matters per referral we will see that each case presented us with between two and three issues which is a higher average than any other county in the South West and Mid Wales region.

Communication Breakdown occurred in a staggering 50% of cases and has remained the most prevalent issue right across the year. The failure by schools and the Local Authority to communicate effectively with families has exacerbated situations where a difference of opinion has occurred. This has caused a great deal of undue stress and frustration for those families. Requests for information/meetings have been made by families and Development Staff with very little response on occasion meaning families feel that they cannot move situations on and subsequently rely on our service to chase up answers to questions. Our role is to empower parents to be able to resolve issues themselves where possible but this is difficult when communication isn’t returned.

SNAP Cymru has supported a number of families to negotiate with the LA regarding statutory assessment issues. The non issue of statements in some cases has meant a significant amount of Development officer time has been spent on appeal preparation. Issues regarding school reviews have also meant a lot of time has been spent on discussion with parents and the LA in coming to agreement or going further to appeal. However, there has been some positives with some schools referring in to SNAP Cymru for parents who need support at reviews in school, especially where there are issues regarding statutory assessment, draft statements that do not match the child’s needs, ‘refusal to assess’ and issuing of notes in lieu detailing 1:1 support instead of a statement. This has caused concerns for the schools and parents alike.

During the summer the Telephone Helpline (THL) took 7 new referrals. The THL was successful in providing parents with sufficient advice to make them feel less stressed and able to wait until the beginning of term to get further on with their requests for statements, mediation meetings for appeals, and proposed provision for their children in school. The LA was proactive in referring the parents to SNAP Cymru and despite the Carmarthenshire Development Officer being on leave, regional staff worked with Pupil Progress Officers in Carmarthenshire to deal with issues for some parents.

We have supported four Looked After Children in Carmarthenshire and this has produced good working relationships with Foster carers and SSD. Two of these cases involved children placed in Carmarthenshire from neighbouring authorities. As a result we have also built relationships with professionals from Torfaen and Caerphilly LA’s. The National Youth Advocacy Service (NYAS) asked for advice and actively promoted our service to foster parents for support. All children fitted the remit of the Reach The Heights project with positive results for looked after children.

SNAP Cymru supported one family at a Disability Discrimination Tribunal in November. This proved to be extremely time consuming due to preparatory work and the level of need of the parent. Due to the complexity of the case and the time commitment required by the family the Senior Development Officer assisted the Carmarthenshire Development officer to support the family.

There have been difficulties with a new County provision in Queen Elizabeth High School. SNAP Cymru helped to facilitate open communication between the LA, the school and parents to discuss the issues as many parents were unhappy with what they saw as a lack of provision as well as delays in provision for their children.

Key issues arising for SNAP Cymru

KEY PRIORITIES FOR

CARMARTHENSHIRE LOCAL AUTHORITY

Priority 1

To improve communication with a range of stakeholders- staff, pupils, schools, parents…

Priority 2

Remodel how we use current ALN resources- provision, Statementing/ School Action, budget, staffing.

Priority 3

Improve our practice in monitoring the support for pupils with ALN and use of resources by schools- PPO role, Inclusion Mark approach

Priority 4

To review our current provision and services (right service in right place?) for pupils with ALN to strengthen and improve our service for pupils with Additional Learning Needs and to work collaboratively with partners across SWAMWAC

Priority 5

Maximising the potential of the Statements or Something better Pilots- to implement the strategies and ideas being developed by WAG’s Alternative to Statements Pilot

Priority 6

To develop the Team Around the Child/Family approach in Carmarthenshire

Priority 7

Developing the idea of system leadership/PLC’s in the ALN community




Managing Behaviour in Carmarthenshire- Behaviour Management Plan 2010-13

The current plan has been formulated following extensive consultation with the Schools’ Strategic Forum, secondary headteachers and senior managers from Children’s Services, School Improvement, and Inclusion and Governance.

Aim

Action

Lead staff

Target dates

Outcomes

To ensure delivery of an effective programme of training and development

    Re-present Behaviour Resource Pack Vol. 1 in modular format to enable self-study at school level.

    Make modules accessible on AMDRO.

    Respond to WAG National Priorities on Behaviour Training

    Complete Volume 2 of Behaviour Resource pack

Senior EP (Behaviour)

Behaviour Services Manager

September 2010

On-going

Academic Year 2011-2012

 

To enhance Educational Psychology Support to schools

    Explore opportunities to provide in-school surgeries on behaviour management

    Explore “drop-in” centre sessions based on families of schools

Principal EP and team

Academic Year 2010-2011

 

To provide in-school support for managing pupil behaviour through the work of the Behaviour Support Community Team

    Embed the current intensive model of working with pupils, their parents and teachers.

    Continue to offer customised training at school level

    Develop a pilot programme with two primary schools focussed on an early intervention/nurture approach linked with the Foundation phase

Team Leader BSCT and Senior EP (Behaviour)

   

To support the work of the Day Centre provision at Rhydygors School campus

    Develop an effective monitoring system for pupil placements, including reporting back to Placement Panel on individual placements as necessary

Behaviour Services Manager, School link EP, PPOs

   

To improve rates of reintegration of pupils back into schools

    Improve quality of planning with schools for individual pupils’ integration to school

    Explore different models of pupil placement at the KS3 Centre

    Develop a contract with schools regarding the placement

All schools

and Heads of Centre Pwll KS3 Teaching and Learning Centre and Rhydygors Day Centre

Behaviour Services Manager, Head of KS3 Centre and secondary schools

Academic Year 2010 - 2011

 

To improve the quality of teaching premises used by the provision for emotionally fragile pupils

    Identify suitable teaching premises for this provision

    Clarify criteria for referral to this provision

Head of Governance and Inclusion

Behaviour Services Manager

Summer Term 2010

 

To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the LA’s Home Tuition Service

    Conduct a review of the provision to include

      1. number of hours allocated per pupil

      2. an analysis of type of referral

      3. Produce proposals for future service operation

Behaviour Services Manager

Summer Term 2010

 

To develop a coherent authority-wide KS4 provision for pupils exhibiting challenging behaviour

    Examine the Department’s use of funding in this area

    Explore potential funding streams from 14-19 Network and from secondary schools

    Review the provision for Vulnerable Pupils at KS4

    Review the Youth Access Programmes including the work of SMART

    Engage with other service providers such as West Wales Chamber (FACE) regarding LEA monitoring arrangements

Behaviour Services Manager

   

To review demand for different types of ESBD placement

    Explore options for more flexible arrangements for admission at Rhydygors Residential Special School e.g. permanent day places at the school (not the Day Centre)

Head of Governance and Inclusion, Behaviour Services Manager and Headteacher RYG School

   

To publish a Managed Moves protocol for the local authority

    Present agreed protocol on Managed Moves to Admissions Forum for signing off.

Head of Governance and Inclusion

Summer Term 2010

 

To improve the working of Placement Panel

    Headteacher members of panel to sit for a minimum one term on a rotational cycle

Head of Governance and Inclusion

Academic Year 2010

 

To improve the working of the Director’s Panel

    The Director’s Panel to ensure, when allocating a human resource, that a school evidences a commitment to supporting the development of the Learning Support Assistant’s skills and expertise

    Individual schools to ensure named LSA accesses Induction Course provided by EP/BSCT teacher

    Identify 3 or 4 schools to operate a pilot project -delegate their non-statement resources, allowing these schools to make their own decisions

ALN Manager and Principal EP

Headteachers, Senior EP (Behaviour)

Head of Governance and Inclusion, ALN Manager, Behaviour Services Manager and Inclusion Finance Officer

Academic Year 2010

 

To improve our processes for data collection and analysis

    Review current processes and procedures

    Identify the range of personnel currently involved in data collection and analysis

    Produce a report identifying changes needed to enable officers to form a holistic view of demand, input and results

 

Academic Year 2010-2011

 


Review of the funding of SEN/ALN in Carmarthenshire Schools- DRAFT

1. Introduction- why the study is required

The SEN/ALN budget is at present held and managed centrally. The budget provides-

A significant percentage of the budget is delegated to individual school budgets at the start of the financial year; this funding is to cover the cost of our specialist provisions and to provide additional support for individual pupils with and without statements of SEN which has already been committed.

The remaining budget is allocated during the financial year following applications to the Local Authority’s panels-

The current process is bureaucratic and time consuming for schools and officers. The panel process entails producing and providing evidence in order to ensure consistency of approach in dealing with applications. In addition as the LA holds the purse the onus is on the local authority to resolve issues and to deal with complaints. The current process takes key officers away from their strategic and supportive roles. The current process needs a high level of administrative input.

In addition there are other budget headings which provide services for pupils with additional learning needs which can and need to be considered as part of this review e.g. Education Psychology, Sensory Impairment Service, Special Schools, and Behaviour Support.

The PWC report makes recommendations (hypotheses) aimed at ‘shifting resources from administrative/back office type functions to enable more to be directed to front line teaching and learning. The PWC analysis identifies costs of administration within school budgets as well as outside school budgets. Therefore it is in schools’ best interests to ensure that the valuable resources they receive are prioritised into front line teaching and learning rather than into the administration associated in maintaining separate financial systems.

It is widely anticipated that there will be significant reductions in public expenditure over the next three years or so that will impact on the availability of resources within school budgets as well as for other budget areas.

Carmarthenshire CC is developing its own budget strategy in line with the anticipated level of funding reductions and is currently assuming a provisional reduction of 6% in delegated budgets and 15% for all other budgets. In order to ensure that maximum resources are allocated to front line teaching and learning, schools must play their part in reviewing current spend on areas such as funding for SEN/ALN and the costs associated with its administration.

The provisional budget strategy was discussed at the last SBF meeting in September albeit that the Council is still awaiting the outcome of the Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review later in October. The outcome of the CSR will undoubtedly mean less resources being available including grants on which education heavily relies.

The group considered areas for review and agreed that two specific workgroups be set up to review the way that financial systems operate between schools and the Council and the other to look at SEN.

Agree scope of study etc through SBF

November 2010

Initial research

November – January 2011

Formalise Options for change

February – March 2011

School Budget Forum

March/April

Consultation with schools

May/June

Political process etc

June/July 2011?

Depending on outcome of study, could involve staffing changes (union consultation), notice to existing providers, etc in order to implement by the following year 2012-13

The working group will report progress of the study and options for future delivery via the Strategic School Budget Forum. However, accountability will ultimately lie with the Head of Governance and Inclusion/Chief Education Officer to ensure compliance with standards and value for money.

Aspect

RISK

Cooperation from schools on developing a new approach to funding/supporting ALN

Low/Medium

Cooperation of staff and departments in identifying alternative approaches.

Low

Availability/capacity of relevant staff to carry out the research

Medium

Buy in of recommendations

Medium/High

Capacity of small schools in being able to take on additional responsibilities

High

Availability of key practitioners in each ‘family’ to lead on new approach

Low

Possibility of little savings being generated

High

Impact on pupils/teaching staff if study not progressed properly

High

Questions to ask in relation to models developed by other local authorities


SNAP DATA reported from01.04.09 70 29.03/10

MATTERS REPORTED

   

Description

No.

%

16+ Provision

2

1%

Access to Services

12

5%

Amendment to Statement

2

1%

Appeals - Admission

2

1%

Appeals - Exclusion

3

1%

Appeals - SEN Tribunal

5

2%

Bullying

6

3%

Communication Breakdown

43

20%

Complaints

2

1%

Diagnosis

3

1%

Discrimination

4

2%

Early Years Provision

3

1%

Exclusion-Fixed

4

2%

Exclusion-Permanent

5

2%

Exclusion-Voluntary/Soft

2

1%

Final Statement

2

1%

IEP

2

1%

Local Service Provision and Practice

6

3%

Medical Assessment

7

3%

Medication

1

0%

No School Placement

4

2%

Placement

4

2%

Proposed/Draft Statement

5

2%

Reduced Timetable

1

0%

Refusal to Assess

1

0%

Review

20

9%

School Provision

36

16%

Statement

2

1%

Statutory Assessment

19

9%

Transition

7

3%

Transport

3

1%

TOTAL

220

 

REFERRAL TYPE

   

Gender

No.

%

Male

66

76%

Female

21

24%

TOTAL

87

 
     

Living Arrangements

 

%

Family

83

95%

Foster Carers

4

5%

TOTAL

87

 

Family Language

   

English

77

89%

Welsh

5

6%

Bi-Lingual

5

6%

Other

 

0%

TOTAL

87

 
     

Referral Source

   

Childrens Commissioner

2

2%

CYP Partnership

1

1%

Health Centre/Clinic

3

3%

LEA

10

11%

Multi-Agency Team

2

2%

Other Parent

17

20%

Re-Referral

11

13%

School

8

9%

SNAP - Leaflet

2

2%

SNAP - Website

2

2%

Social Services

2

2%

Telephone Helpline (THL)

20

23%

Voluntary Organisation

7

8%

TOTAL

87

 

AGE

   

Description

No.

%

3 year

7

8%

4 year

3

3%

5 year

5

6%

6 year

6

7%

7 year

9

10%

8 year

11

13%

9 year

3

3%

10 year

10

11%

11 year

3

3%

12 year

13

15%

13 year

8

9%

14 year

5

6%

15 year

2

2%

16 year

1

1%

17 year

1

1%

TOTAL

87

 
     

AGE GROUPS

No.

%

0 to 3

7

8%

4 to 10

47

54%

11 to 15

29

33%

16 +

4

5%

TOTAL

87

 

 

Carmarthen

Dinefwr

Llanelli

Welsh Provision

O + A

Richmond Park

Bro Banw

Y Felin

-

Speech and Lang Infants

-

Bro Banw

Y Felin

Nantgaredig

Speech and Lang Junior

-

-

Brynteg

Nantgaredig

Autism

Myrddin

Bro Banw

Pwll Primary Provision

Myrddin

SLD

 

Bro Banw

Heol Goffa

Y Felin

-

Hearing Impairment

-

Parcyrhun

-

Parcyrhun

PMLD

Myrddin

Bro Banw

Heol Goffa

-

Behaviour/Emotional

Rhydygors

-

-

-



PRIMARY PROVISION

SECONDARY PROVISION

 

Carmarthen

Dinefwr

Llanelli

Welsh Provision

Speech and Language

-

Tregib

-

-

Autism

Canolfan Elfed

Garreglwyd

-

Maesyryrfa

SLD

Canolfan Elfed

Bro Banw

Heol Goffa

-

Hearing Impairment

Canolfan Elfed

-

-

-

PMLD

Canolfan Elfed

Bro Banw

Heol Goffa

-

Behaviour/Emotional

Rhydygors

Aalton House

-

Pwll KS3 Teaching and Learning Centre

-

OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT UNITS

Carmarthenshire has three observation and assessment units comprising five classes in all, with provision for up to 60 pupils aged three to seven years.

BRO BANW INFANTS OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT UNIT

Bro Banw observation unit is a short term placement for 18 children three, to seven years of age, with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

RICHMOND PARK CP OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT UNIT

Richmond Park assessment unit is a short term placement for 12 children, three to seven years of age, with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

YSGOL Y FELIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT UNIT

Ysgol y Felin assessment unit is a short term placement for 16 children, three to seven years of age, with general/specific developmental delay undergoing intensive assessment.

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNITS

The Authority recognises that speech, language and communication difficulties form a barrier to learning and are therefore educational needs for which provision needs to be made. The bulk of its provision to meet speech and language needs is in mainstream schools, supplied under service level agreements by health.

Pupils whose needs warrant provision in a specialist speech and language unit have access to mainstream experiences and opportunities in the host school. The authority has the following speech and language unit provision:

BRO BANW INFANTS SCHOOL SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNIT

Bro Banw speech and language unit caters for eight children, three to seven years of age, whose primary difficulty is a speech and/or language disorder.

NANTGAREDIG CP SCHOOL SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNIT (INFANTS)

Nantgaredig speech and language unit caters for eight to ten children three to seven years of age, whose first language is Welsh and who are experiencing a specific speech and/or language disorder.

YSGOL Y FELIN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNIT

Ysgol y Felin speech and language unit caters for up to eight children, three to seven years of age, with a specific speech and/or language disorder.

YSGOL BRYNTEG SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNIT (JUNIOR)

Brynteg Junior speech and language unit caters for ten children, seven to eleven years of age, with a specific speech and/or language disorder.

NANTGAREDIG JUNIOR CP SCHOOL SPEECH AND LANGUAGE UNIT

Nantgaredig Junior Language Unit caters for eight to ten children, from seven to eleven years of age, whose first language is Welsh and who are experiencing a specific speech and/or language disorder.

PROVISION FOR PUPILS WITH SEVERE, PROFOUND AND MULTIPLE LEARNING DIFFICULTIES

HEOL GOFFA SPECIAL SCHOOL

Heol Goffa is a day special school for up to 75 children and young adults with severe, profound and multiple learning difficulties from three to 19 years of age.

BRO BANW SPECIAL NEEDS UNIT

Bro Banw special needs unit caters for 24 children, three to 19 years of age, with various categories of special needs.

MYRDDIN SPECIAL NEEDS UNIT

Myrddin special needs unit caters for 20-24 children, three to 11 years of age, with various categories of special needs.

WHITEMILL SPECIAL NEEDS UNIT

There are no longer any admissions to this provision as an alternative provision has been developed.

CANOLFAN ELFED

Canolfan Elfed provides 56 full time equivalent places for pupils, 11 up to 19 years of age, for pupils with sensory impairment (8), ASD (17), PMLD (14) and SLD (17).

SPECIAL PROVISION FOR PUPILS ON THE ASD (AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDER) CONTINUUM

Autistic Spectrum Disorder is experienced on a very wide continuum. At one end of the continuum children and young people can experience mild and moderate difficulties in engaging with their peers. By contrast, at the other end of the continuum, pupils can experience very severe difficulties in accessing learning and engaging with others. The specialist provision is targeted at those pupils who experience greatest difficulty in engaging with others.

PRIMARY- PWLL AUTISTIC UNIT

Pwll autistic unit caters for six children, three to 11 years of age on the autistic spectrum.

BRO BANW AUTISTIC UNIT

Bro Banw autistic unit caters for six children, three to 11 years of age on the autistic spectrum continuum.

MYRDDIN AUTISTIC UNIT

Myrddin Autistic Unit caters for six children three to eleven years of age on the autistic spectrum. This is a bilingual provision.

SECONDARY- YSGOL Y GWENDRAETH/GARREGLWYD AUTISTIC UNIT

Garreglwyd autistic provision caters for 18 pupils.

PROVISION FOR PRIMARY AGE PUPILS WITH HEARING DIFFICULTIES

The authority has developed a resource centre based approach to meeting the needs of children and young people with hearing difficulties.

The resource centre is at: PARC Y RHUN SCHOOL. This caters for 8 pupils. The resource centre provides an inclusive base for pupils from schools in Carmarthenshire.

They attend the resource centre to access specialist teaching facilities and support. The focus of this support is to develop pupils’ confidence to engage and make progress in learning in mainstream settings. As children make progress, they will have opportunities for inclusion in the host school.

SPECIALIST PROVISION TO MEET THE NEEDS OF PUPILS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES- DYSLEXIA

The authority’s strategy is to work to make all of its schools dyslexia-friendly environments. Such a development is a gradual ongoing process that will take a number of years to complete.

At secondary school level, most schools have employed their own ‘dyslexia’ trained teacher who provides support to pupils with dyslexia and gives advice, guidance and support to colleagues on effective ways to meet the needs of dyslexic pupils. In addition, the authority has developed two support centres to meet the needs of dyslexic pupils.

QUEEN ELIZABETH MARIDUNUM DYSLEXIC UNIT

One full time equivalent teacher who provides advice, guidance and support to pupils with dyslexia.

EMLYN COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL

One full time equivalent teacher who provides advice, guidance and support to pupils with dyslexia.

PROVISION TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THOSE WITH EMOTIONAL, SOCIAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DIFFICULTIES (ESBD)

AALTON HOUSE TUITION CENTRE

Aalton House provides a short term day placement for 15 children with significant emotional and behavioural difficulties between the ages of 11 – 16.

PROVISION FOR PUPILS AGED 7 TO 16- YSGOL RHYDYGORS SPECIAL SCHOOL

Ysgol Rhydygors is a weekly residential special school for 45 children and young people with significant emotional and behavioural difficulties aged from seven to 16+ years of age.


Carmarthenshire Behaviour Management Services

Cross-county Training and Development

A variety of course and resources are available to schools to support their work in managing challenging behaviour. A number of course are available through the Better Schools Funding programme, in addition to tailor-made courses for individual schools devised in partnership with schools.

In-school behaviour support

The Behaviour Support Community Team works with schools to support them in changing the behaviour of individual pupils by working with the pupil, their parents/carers and the teacher(s). The Team can provide advice and support on group/whole class management techniques and whole-school behaviour policy development. The Team also works in partnership with schools to provide customised professional development/training opportunities. Referrals are made by schools to the Behaviour Management Co-ordinator.

Rhydygors Behaviour Centre (Day provision)

This is a provision for primary and KS3 pupils who need sustained, intensive support in learning to manage their behaviour. Referrals to the Centre are made by schools through the County’s Placement Panel. It is expected that all pupils being referred to the Placement Panel will already have received intensive in-school behaviour support from a member of the Behaviour Support Community Team. The duration of a placement can range from one to two school terms. The Day Centre is located on the campus of Rhydygors EBD Residential School in Johnstown, Carmarthen. The Headteacher of Rhydygors School provides day to day management of the Centre.

The KS3 Teaching and Learning Centre

This is a county pupil referral unit for pupils in Years 7-9 who are deemed at risk of exclusion or who have been permanently excluded from school. It was established in September 2007 and is located in Pwll, Llanelli. Referrals to the Centre are made by schools through the County’s Placement Panel. The Centre is managed by Chris Aplin, Head of Centre.

The KS4 Vulnerable Pupils’ Programme

This is a provision for pupils in KS4 who have failed to engage in school and with alternative provision such as SMART and FACE, and are consequently out of school. The provision uses premises at two community education centres in the Llanelli area. It is managed by Paul Williams, Head of Centre.

Aalton House Tuition Centre

This is a county pupil referral unit for pupils of secondary age who are deemed to have emotional and/or mental health difficulties, and who require a safe, nurturing environment in which to learn. It is located in Johnstown, Carmarthen. Referrals to the Centre are made by schools through the County’s Placement Panel. The Centre is managed by Erica Hunt Acting Teacher in Charge.

Home/individual tuition service

This is a provision for pupils aged 5 – 18 who are deemed temporarily unfit by a medical practitioner to attend school for medical reasons. All pupils referred are on a school roll. Referrals are made by schools to R Mike Jones Alternative Education Organiser.

This Service also arranges placements and/or provision for any pupils out of school.


ALN

Additional Learning Needs

ALNCO

Additional Learning Needs Coordinator

AMDRO

Carmarthenshire Education and Schools website

ASD

Autistic Spectrum Disorders'

AWPU

Age Weighted Pupil Unit Value

BSCT

Behaviour Support Community team

CAF

Common Assessment Framework

CSR

Comprehensive Spending Review

CSSIW

Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales

CYPP

Children and Young People's Partnership

DDA

Disability Discrimination Act

EAL

English as an Additional Language

EBD

Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

EOTAS

Education Otherwise Than at School

EP

Educational Psychologist

EPS

Educational Psychology Service

ESBD

Emotional, Social and Behavioural Difficulties

ESTYN

The office of Her Majesty's Inspectorate for Education and Training in Wales.

EWO

Education Welfare Officer

EWS

Education Welfare Service

IDP

Individual Development Plan

IEP

Individual Education Plan

KS

Key Stage

LA

Local Authority

LAC

Looked After Children

MEP

Modernising Education Provision

METAS

Ethnic Minority Achievement Service

NEET

Not in Education, Employment or Training

O+A Unit

Observation and Assessment Unit

PCT

Person Centred Thinking

PLASC

Pupil Level Annual School Census

PLC

Professional Learning Community

PMLD

profound and multiple learning disability

PPO

Pupil Progress Officers

PRU

Pupil Referral Unit

PWC

PriceWaterhouseCooper

RAISE

Raising Attainment and Individual Standards in Education in Wales

RDC

Rhydygors Day Centre

SALT

Speech and Language Therapy

SBF

School Strategy and Budget Forum

SCIP

Social Communication Intervention Programme

SEF

School Effectiveness Framework

SEN

Special Educational Needs

SENCO

Special Educational Needs Coordinator

SENTW

Special Educational Needs Tribunal for Wales

SIO

School Improvement Officer

SIS

School Improvement Service

SLD

Severe Learning Difficulties

SLD

Specific Learning Difficulties

SLT

Speech and Language Therapy

SMART

The Smart Project is a wider curriculum programme, run by Jobforce Wales in partnership with Carmarthenshire Youth Service.

SNAP

SNAP Cymru is a Charity that offers information and support to families of children and young people who have special educational needs

SSD

Social Services Department

STATEMENT OF SEN

A statement will describe a child’s SEN and the special help a child should receive. The Local Authority (LA) will usually make a statement if it decides that all of the special help a child needs cannot be provided from within the school’s existing resources. These resources could include money, staff time and special equipment.

SWAMWAC

South Wales and Mid Wales Consortium

TAC

Team around the Child

TAF

Team around the Family

TAPPAS

Team around Pupil Parents and School

TAs

Teaching Assistants

TLC

Teaching and Learning Centre

WAG

Welsh Assembly Government

WPSOS

Working Party for Support Outside of Statements